Tag Archives: Alexander Povetkin

Eddie Hearn Brutally Honest On Dillian Whyte’s Career If He Loses Against Alexander Povetkin Again: “I Think It’s Terminal For His World Title Chances”


By: Hans Themistode

Heavyweight contender Dillian Whyte was in clear control of his career. 

Following eight straight wins against some of the divisions very best including former belt holders Joseph Parker and Lucas Browne, Whyte (27-2, 18 KOs) found himself on the verge of his very own title shot. All the British native needed to do was dispose of the ancient 41 year old contender Alexander Povetkin on August 22nd. 

Before their matchup, WBC President Mauricio Sulaiman went on the record stating that if Whyte managed to do what many were expecting, that he would be given the first shot at the Deontay Wilder vs Tyson Fury winner. 

Povetkin vs Whyte played out typically to start off. Whyte out boxed his man early until he landed bombs on the Russian contender in the fourth round, dropping him twice. Then out of seemingly nowhere, Povetkin landed a monstrous left uppercut that immediately turned off Whyte’s light switch. 

Before Whyte could give his concession speech though, he was calling for an instant rematch. Well, come November 21st, he’ll have his wish. 

Promoter Eddie Hearn didn’t sound thrilled when discussing Whyte’s quick turn around. With that being said, he simply acquiesced to his request.

“Moving into the rematch just 13 weeks after the first fight is very, very dangerous,” said Hearn to Sky Sports. “But Dillian Whyte wouldn’t have it any other way.”

For Povetkin, asking the recently turned 41 year old to make such a quick turn around would seem unfair on his part. But with a highlight level knockout win over his man already under his belt, both him and his team believe that they can and will do it again. 

“Povetkin and his team are ready to go,” said Hearn. “They don’t see a problem. They’ve knocked him out once and they believe they’re going to do it again in November. “

For the past half decade, Whyte carried both pressure and expectations into the ring with him. Following his knockout loss at the hands of current unified champion Anthony Joshua in late 2015, Whyte spent all of his time rebuilding his name and image. By all accounts, it worked. He was widely regarded as a top contender in the division and stood in the number one spot in the WBC rankings. 

The British native could have easily stood by, twiddled his thumbs and waited for his shot at a world title. Instead, he repeatedly placed everything on the line time and time again. The pressure to perform never seemed to bother him, but with two huge knockout losses on his record, Hearn believes the pressure on Whyte for his rematch with Povetkin is going to be out of this world. 

“This is the pressure of his career. He was controlling the fight August 22nd, and then brutal knockout. All of a sudden his career spins on its head. But he’s hugely motivated to put this right but it’s extremely dangerous. I think it’s terminal for his world title chances and that’s obviously the ultimate aim for Dillian Whyte. I think he knows the pressure.”

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Dillian Whyte vs Alexander Povetkin 2 Goes Down On November 21st


By: Hans Themistode

Dillian Whyte doesn’t want any time off. From the moment his limp body bounced off the canvas, on August 22nd, against Alexander Povetkin, Whyte was begging to redeem himself. 

The heavyweight contender officially got his wish earlier today as promoter Eddie Hearn announced a pay-per-view headlining rematch between the two on November 21st. 

Everything seemed to be going right for Whyte (27-2, 18 KOs) during their first matchup. He was patient and countered well when needed. After two knockdowns in the fourth round from Whyte, fans began predicting who he would be facing next.

Then, seemingly out of nowhere, Povetkin (36-2-1, 25 KOs) landed one deleterious uppercut and the lights were immediately out well before Whyte’s head hit the mat. And just like that, years of working his way to the top of the division went down the drain. 

He’ll do his best to reach back into that drain to retrieve what he believes belongs to him. 

“I’m over the moon to have the rematch,” Whyte said in a press release. “As soon as I got out of the ring, I was looking for confirmation that the fight would be on. I can’t wait to get back in the ring and get back what is rightfully mine. I’m looking to do what I said I would the first time, and that’s beat Alexander Povetkin.”

Tape is often times a fighters best friend when it comes to rematches. The footage will show them what went wrong on the night and in the case of Whyte, how to avoid the left hook of Povetkin that ended his. Yet, Whyte isn’t interested in making any changes. The heavyweight contender simply believes that what happened the first time around won’t happen again.

“There won’t be any major adjustments, but I just need to be more switched on and not get distracted,” Whyte said. “He was able to use his experience against me. I will be a lot more focused and sharper in the rematch. I’m coming to win and knock him out. I’m coming to even the score, and the only way to do that is by knocking him out.”

Talking trash has always been a part of Whyte’s game, Povetkin on the other hand, not so much. So it came as no surprise that he heaped praise on Whyte while beginning his preparation.

“I’ve rested well, spent time with my family,” Povetkin said, “and now that the date of the rematch is known, I will soon return to my training camp and prepare as thoroughly as I did for the first fight. As I said before the first fight, and after it, too, Dillian Whyte is a good, strong boxer. I will be ready to enter the ring on November 21. I hope it will be another beautiful fight for the fans.”

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MatchRoom Boxing Results: Alexander Povetkin Scores Ridiculous One Punch Knockout Over Dillian Whyte


Well, that was shocking. After finding himself on the canvas not once but twice, Alexander Povetkin (36-2-1, 25 KOs) was thought to be completely out of it against Dillian Whyte (27-2, 18 KOs).

The two squared off as the final event of Fight Camp in Eddie Hearn’s Matchroom Boxing backyard. Whyte walked into their contest as the heavy favorite and for good reason. Yet, no matter how many people counted Povetkin out, with one cold hearted left hook, he quickly put out the lights of Whyte in the fifth round and ended their contest in dramatic fashion.

Katie Taylor vs Delfine Persoon

There may not have been a crowd to give both Katie Taylor and Delfine Persoon an applause, but there is no doubt that the fans watching from home gave a standing ovation.

Taylor (16-0, 6 KOs) got the proverbial monkey off her back this afternoon. When the undisputed lightweight champion met Persoon (44-3, 18 KOs) last year, many were split on who won. This time around, Taylor left no doubt as she was the better boxer on the night.

Persoon, as always, came forward and created chaos for Taylor. To her credit though, she managed to avoid the big shots and land some of her own. It was clear that Taylor was in no mood for a firefight, yet she found herself in one during long stretches of their matchup.

Unlike their first contest however, Taylor dealt with the pressure like the champion that she is and walked away with her undefeated record intact.

The final scores were as followed: 98-93 and two scores of 96-94 all in favor of Taylor.

Chris Kongo vs Luther Clay

It was a systematical breakdown applied by welterweight prospect Chris Kongo (12-0, 7 KOs) against Luther Clay (13-2, 5 KOs).

Throughout much of their contest, Kongo dictated the pace. He showed that size does matter as he continually backed his man up. To the credit of Clay though, he never gave up and rallied back during the mid rounds.

His success however, was brief as Kongo began doubling up on his pressure. Clay reached his breaking point in the ninth round as he hit the deck. The referee began his count but quickly waved off their bout as Clay simply looked out of it.

Shawndell Winters vs Alen Babic

This year just hasn’t been kind to heavyweight journeymen Shawndell Winters (13-4, 12 KOs). Earlier this year, the Illinois native found himself on the wrong end of a knockout loss. That devastating defeat came at the hands of former heavyweight belt holder Joseph Parker.

Fast forward to today, and he once again found himself flat on the mat. This time at the hands of heavyweight prospect Alen Babic (4-0, 4 KOs). With only a few seconds into their second round matchup, Babic sent his man down to the deck. From there, the referee waved off the contest.

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Dillian Whyte Has One Last Hurdle: “This is Usually The Most Dangerous”


By: Hans Themistode

Heavyweight contender Dillian Whyte took the long road to a title shot. 

It wasn’t the path he wanted to travel, but it was the only one given to him. 

Dillian Whyte v Mariusz Wach, Heavyweight bout , Diriyah, Saudi Arabia. 7th December 2019. Picture By Ian Walton.

Everyone remembers Whyte (27-1, 18 KOs) slumped over the bottom the ropes, eyes rolled in the back of his head and seemingly lifeless five years ago. 

His state of unconsciousness was handed to him by long time rival Anthony Joshua in the seventh round of their matchup. Since then, the dirt that was thrown on his boxing career has been brushed aside as he has revived his career. 

With 11 straight wins over the likes of perpetual contenders in Dereck Chisora and Robert Helenius as well as former champions such as Lucas Browne and Joseph Parker, Whyte now finds himself on the doorstep of his first crack at a world title. Provided of course, he gets through one more door this Saturday night. 

Whyte, 32, faces off in the final headliner of promoter Eddie Hearn’s Fight Camp series where he’ll take on Alexander Povetkin. 

With 396 days since Whyte claimed the WBC mandatory position, President Mauricio Sulaiman has assured the British native that a win this coming Saturday night will ensure that he won’t be skipped in line for a title shot. 

“The winner of Wilder-Fury is committed to fight Whyte if he is victorious on August 22nd,” said Sulaiman on Boxinginsider radio earlier this year.

The news of his title shot may have brought a smile to the contenders face, but Povetkin will be aiming to turn it upside this Saturday night. 

At the age of 40, Povetkin’s championship window is closing faster than ever. 

With a shiny gold medal dangling around his neck from the 2004 Olympics, Povetkin wrecked the competition right from the gate. His impressive knockout performances resulted in his first crack at a world title against Wladimir Klitschko in 2013. It was a night that Povetkin would rather forget though as he was outclassed. 

Fast forward five years later and he would obtain another world title shot, this time against Joshua. The results were the same as Povetkin was stopped in the seventh round. 

Now, fresh of a split decision draw in his last contest against Michael Hunter in December of 2019, Povetkin steps into this matchup against Whyte some what as an unknown. At the age of 40, and his reflexes slowing down considerably, he isn’t quite what he once was. With that being said, the Russian native has put in overtime during his training camp in order to turn back the clock come Saturday night. 

“I understand how important this fight is,” explained Povetkin during a recent press conference. “When you’re taking a fight against Dillian you have to be prepared.”

The journey to his first world title opportunity has been an abnormally long one for Whyte. Yet with several big time wins under his belt and the number one ranking in the WBC sanctioning body, Whyte is not only looking at his contest against Povetkin as a must win, but he also has his notepad and pen ready to take notes.

“This is usually the most dangerous and hardest hurdle to be honest but I deal with pressure well. I could have had an easier fight but I’m still learning. I had seven amateur fights and 20 professional fights so I’m still learning. These are the sort of fights that you need to grow. This guy has seen 20 guys that fight the same style as me so I have to be ready and this is a fight that I need and can learn from.”

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Eddie Hearn: “Dillian Whyte vs Alexander Povetkin Will Take Place Behind Closed Doors”


By: Hans Themistode

Boxing behind closed doors has become the best and quickest way for fight fans to see their favorite fighters back in the ring. It has it’s pros and cons though. The good, things will feel somewhat normal amidst COVID-19, and the entertainment is desperately needed. The bad however, is that without fans dishing out large sums of cash to get up close and personal, it could cause major issues when it comes to making big fights.

August 8, 2018; Chicago, IL, USA; Eddie Hearn speaks at the press conference announcing the October 6, 2018 Matchroom Boxing USA card at the Wintrust Arena in Chicago, IL. Mandatory Credit: Ed Mulholland/Matchroom Boxing USA

Still, for as bad as fans want to watch boxing on their big screens, they really want to see the marquee names go at it. In order for that to happen, one of the more recognizable names in the sport has to take the first step forward. And at the moment, it seems as though we have a couple of volunteers.

“A lot of people think it is difficult for bigger fights to happen behind closed doors,” said promoter Eddie Hearn told The Boxing Show on Sky Sports. But Dillian Whyte vs Alexander Povetkin is one of the fights we are planning to stage in the early part of the return, it will take place behind closed doors.”

Whyte of course, was scheduled to take on Povetkin in what was going to be one of the best cards all year. Some would argue that the co main event fight between unified Lightweight titlist Katie Taylor and seven division champion Amanda Serrano was good enough to headline on it’s own. But in today’s day and age, where fight cards seldom have more than one must see fight, this May 2nd event was a welcomed sight.

While most fans would be satisfied with Whyte vs Povetkin, there would be a feeling of disappointment if Taylor vs Serrano didn’t take place. That disappointing feeling however, will soon replaced with satisfaction if Eddie Hearn can somehow find a way to make it happen.

“I don’t know how we’re going to do it yet. But we have to come back with a bang. Whyte vs Povetkin, along with Katie Taylor vs Amanda Serrano, is a fight that I believe we will see at the end of July or early-August. It’s the biggest fight in women’s boxing,” Hearn said. “Looking at the achievements of Taylor and the growth of women’s boxing? It’s incredible.”

“She is pound-for-pound one of the biggest superstars in the sport. I will try to make it happen on the Whyte vs Povetkin card somehow, somewhere, some way.”

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Alex Povetkin Destroys Mike Perez with First Round TKO


by Johnny Walker

While many opponents of both current heavyweight king Wladimir Klitschko and now retired WBC world champ Vitali Klitschko have quickly faded away or never been the same again, Russian Alexander Povetkin seems to be the exception to that paradigm.

Since losing to Wladimir in 2013, Povetkin has emerged a new, fearsome fighter, gaining momentum with wins over Manuel Charr and Carlos Takam, and today continuing that streak in Moscow with a quick and decisive destruction of Mike Perez.

The bout had barely gotten underway when Povetkin, fighting at the highest weight of his career but looking as if that was added weight in muscle, with bulging arms and a rippling back, staggered a sleepy Perez with a hard right hand. Essentially the fight was already over, as Perez never really recovered, his legs now Jello as he tried to respond and the Russian crowd went wild.

Another vicious right hand sent Perez tumbling to the mat, and the fighter’s glazed eyes indicated that he was finished. Referee Massimo Barrovecchio perhaps unwisely sent Perez back into battle, and another right hand shot from Povetkin nearly sent Perez clear through the ropes and out of the ring. Povetkin (29-1, 21 KOs) was thus declared the winner of the bout by TKO at 1:31 of round one.

Povetkin-Perez

American WBC world heavyweight title holder Deontay “The Bronze Bomber” Wilder (the belt captured with a win over Bermane Stiverne after Vitali Klitschko retired for a life in politics) now finds Povetkin, who many rate as the number two heavyweight in the world after Wladimir Klitschko, as his mandatory challenger for the belt.

In bouts on the undercard, WBC cruiserweight king Grigory “Pretty Boy” Drodz (40-1, 28 KOs) stopped Lukasz Janik in round nine after pitching a shutout with a boxing exhibition that entertained the Moscow crowd.

Muscular Russian cruiserweight Rakhim “The Machine” Chakhkiev (23-1, 18 KOs) also won the IBO cruiserweight title after a rather routine performance punctuated by a sudden massive body shot to the solar plexus of American Junior Anthony Wright (13-1-1, 11 KOs) giving him a TKO win at 2:39 of round eight.

Also, former heavyweight title challengers Manuel “Diamond Boy” Charr and Aussie Alex Leapai fought for relevance in the division, with the colorful Charr taking the fight by unanimous decision scores of 98-94, 100-90 and 97-92.

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Captain Huck to Remain Sailing in Cruiserweight Waters…For Now


By Johnny Walker

Marco Huck (r) will stay a cruiserweight for now

After Marco “Captain” Huck (pronounced “Hook”) of Germany (34-2, 25 KOs) battered WBA “regular” heavyweight champion Alexander Povetkin around the ring a few weeks ago and was deprived of what seemed to many observers to be a clear victory, it was thought the WBO cruiserweight champion would continue to sail his ship in the choppy waters of boxing’s heavyweight divison.

However, due to pressure from his promoter Wilfried Sauerland, the Captain will for the time being return to cruiserweight, and face Ola Afolabi (19-2-3, 9 KOs).

We believe that defending his WBO Cruiserweight Title is the best thing for Marco to do,” Wilfried Sauerland said in a press release. “At the age of 27 he is still very young for a boxer. He can always move up to heavyweight later.”

Huck himself had wanted to remain at heavyweight, and who can blame him?

Many “experts” thought Huck would get blown out, knocked cold by Povetkin, but instead it was the lethargic Russian who came within a hair of getting stopped, as the Captain bashed hard right hands into his face over and over again in the second half of their bout.

“I would have loved to remain at heavyweight but my team convinced me to stay at cruiserweight for the time being,” Huck says.

“That´s fine for me. I am happy to continue my domination and keep destroying opponents. I will start with Afolabi. He is a dangerous fighter but he has no chance against me.”

Afolabi is no pushover, and here’s hoping that Marco Huck can get himself motivated for this matchup, having already defeated the British fighter by a UD back in 2009.

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Alexander Povetkin Defends WBA Title in Questionable Majority Decision over Marco Huck


By Johnny Walker

WBA “regular” heavyweight champion Alexander Povetkin was awarded a majority decision win in Stuttgart, Germany, today after being battered around the ring by WBO cruiserweight king Marco “Captain” Huck for the second half of a thrilling heavyweight title fight.

The judges’ final tallies were 114-114, 116-113, and 116-112, but the scores could have easily been reversed.

Boxing Insider’s heavyweight division scribes had it scored in favor of Huck, 117-113 (JW) and 116-114 (PA).

Both fighters came out wary, Huck taking the opening round with some hard left jabs and a trademark flurry that got Povetkin’s attention. Povetkin came roaring back in round two, landing some hard hooks to Huck’s torso, and continued attacking in round three, scoring with a big uppercut and some nice three-punch combinations. It seemed that Povetkin might now be taking over the fight with his heavyweight power.

Huck, however, turned the tide once again in this seesaw affair in round four, leaving Povetkin on shaky legs–for the first of many times–with another flurry of punches. Povetkin now started what would be a continual pattern of bending forward and ducking down low to avoid Huck’s onslaught, leaving the German with nowhere to punch except the back of the Russian’s head. Huck now got the first of what would be numerous warnings from the invasive referee Luis Pabon, who had a negative impact on this fight with his one-sided approach. Not once would Povetkin be reprimanded for his tactics.

Povetkin was already starting to tire in round five, and Huck smartly started to throw uppercuts to try to catch the champion in the act of bending forward. Huck was also still landing some clean, hard jabs that were taking the steam out of Povetkin’s attack. Povetkin rallied in a close round six, landing some thudding body shots on the challenger, but Huck came back at the end of the round with three hard right hands.

Round seven seemed to this writer a pivotal one in the fight. Huck rocked Povetkin with a hard left, and the Russian again tried to bend low. Huck, however, kept pressing and flurried Povetkin, who now was staggering around the ring in a daze, almost going to the mat. Huck ran out of time, or he might have been able to finish Povetkin off then and there.

Round eight saw Huck start off with three stiff left jabs, but Povetkin, now clearly winded, connected with a hard straight right at the end of the round. Povetkin was breathing hard through his mouth in round nine as Huck stepped on the gas, landing an assortment of uppercuts, overhand rights and stiff left jabs. This pattern continued through rounds ten and eleven, as Povetkin looked as if he might collapse from utter exhaustion. Both fighters traded hard shots after the bell in the penultimate round.

Povetkin valiantly tried to rally and save his title in the final round, backing up the challenger with a flurry of punches. Now suffering from a couple of facial cuts and contusions, Huck nevertheless again rallied to land a succession of hard, flush right hands that had Povetkin reeling around the ring: if nothing else, the Russian demonstrated a great chin in this fight. Huck crashed a final huge right hand into Povetkin’s face at the bell, and it seemed that there would be a new WBA “regular” heavyweight champion.

Somewhat perplexingly, though, the judges disagreed, handing the majority decision to the champion. But to paraphrase HBO boxing commentator Jim Lampley, it would be fair in this case to say that while Povetkin (24-0, 16 KOs), won the fight, the brave challenger Marco “Captain” Huck (34-2, 25 KOs) won the event.

A rematch is definitely in order here.

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