Daniel Jacobs: Against All Odds


By: Hans Themistode

We live in a world today where betting has been legalized in several states. It’s become the norm for your average Joe to drop a few bucks on who he thinks will win an upcoming sporting event.

Current IBF Middleweight titlist, Daniel Jacobs (35-2, 29 KOs) is your classic underdog story, as he’s beaten the odds before. His story of defeating cancer has been regurgitated over and over again. It’s a remarkable tale. He has gone from, being told he will never box again nor walk to a world champion and one of the very best in the entire sport of boxing.

October 27, 2018; New York, NY, USA; Danny Jacobs and Sergey Derevyanchenko during their bout for the vacant IBF middleweight championship at the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden. Mandatory Credit: Ed Mulholland/Matchroom Boxing USA

Even with his penchant of doing the improbable, Jacobs still finds himself as the underdog for his contest on May 4th, against unified champion Canelo Alvarez (51-1-2, 35 KOs)

What exactly is an underdog? Simply put, it is a person or team that the general public believes won’t win their upcoming contest.

On paper it’s understandable. Canelo is the bigger name and has fought a murderous row of competition. He has always looked to fight the biggest and best names out there. With the exception of Floyd Mayweather, Canelo has defeated all comers. Sure, there have been a few controversies but that’s besides the point right now. On paper his record is as good as it gets in the world of boxing.

Going into his contest against Daniel Jacobs, Canelo is once again considered the favorite, but something seems wrong this time around. Jacobs has the advantage seemingly everywhere. Height, reach, knockout percentage etc. You name it and Jacobs more than likely holds the edge.

So why is Canelo not only the favorite but a sizable one at that? Jacobs has his own belief as to why this is the case.

“ I think it’s more about his name than anything,” said Jacobs. “ He’s a great fighter don’t get me wrong but I don’t believe he should be favored over me. He’s a star in the sport so I understand it but, true boxing heads know I should be the favorite.”

The odds may seem to indicate that Canelo will have his hands raised Saturday night but those odds will have no input on how the actual fight will play out.

“As for the odds, I don’t really care about that type of stuff. They wont help him win the fight.”

For as great of a fighter as Jacobs is, he is very much an afterthought. After Canelo defeats him on May 4th, he will move on to bigger and better things. Or at least, that is the hope.

Canelo may hold the advantage in the view of public but on paper and in the ring Daniel Jacobs is the favorite, a big one in fact.

Being an underdog has fueled Jacobs for much of his career but soon he will have to find a new source of motivation. After Cinco De Mayo, Jacobs will no longer be labeled an underdog ever again.

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