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Will Floyd Mayweather Resume Fighting and What is He Fighting For?



By: Kirk Jackson

The legendary boxer known as Floyd “Money” Mayweather announced his retirement several times throughout his professional boxing career.

In spite of the recent exhibition transpiring New Year’s Eve 2018, many observers argue Mayweather’s run in 2015 was his real last stint as an elite level professional boxer, fighting fellowboxing legend Manny Pacquiao and finishing the year and his career against former welterweight champion Andre Berto in September of that year.

But sometimes the proverbial pot of gold at the end of therainbow is too tempting to resist. The bag of gold referenced of course is the holy grail of prizes; the manifestation of back and forth probing and bantering between Mayweather and mixed martial arts star Conor McGregor.

The back-and-forth verbal sparring between the two eventually led to one of the biggest sporting events (entertainment-wise and financially speaking) of all-time. Mayweather walked away from the sport again, hundreds of millions of dollars richer and with a perfect professional record of 50-0. 

With the perfect ending, which we rarely see in sports, let alone boxing, one would think that’s it right?

As referenced earlier, from a professional standpoint the answer is yes. As of the end of 2017, the final professional boxing match-up featuring Mayweather was against McGregor. And truth be told, that was more of a spectacle more than anything. Many mma enthusiasts may disagree, but it appeared apparent, Mayweather did not take McGregor seriously and carried him in their bout.

The bout with McGregor was the beginning of the entertainment-exhibition tour Mayweather would embark on and continue into the year 2018 with his latest participant TenshinNasukawa.

Leading into his bout against the 20-year-old Nasukawa, Mayweather was quoted as saying, “I’m in the entertainment business. That’s what I go out there to do. I love to do this.”

“I’m working out to put on a show for three rounds. I’m going to go out there, have fun and do what I do. I’m enjoying life and I’m going to enjoy this experience.”

The eventual bout, fought under traditional boxing rules, in which headlined the RIZIN 14 card at the Saitaima Super Arenajust outside Tokyo, Japan, served its purpose.

Mayweather demolished the young challenger in the first round and reportedly walked away earning more than seven figures for his performance. He enhanced his net worth, his overall stock and stole the spotlight for a brief moment in time.

In spite of criticism from the typical cast of Mayweather detractors, whether it’s mainstream media, the mma world or even within the realm of boxing, these very same critics have intentions of making the same power moves as Mayweather.

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” data-lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>I wish to go to Tokyo to face Tenshin Nasukawa in a Mixed Martial Arts exhibition bout.<br>Before this summer. <br>Please arrange this, this instant. <br>Yours sincerely <br>The champ champ. <a href=”https://twitter.com/ufc?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>@ufc</a> <a href=”https://twitter.com/ParadigmSM?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>@ParadigmSM</a></p>&mdash; Conor McGregor (@TheNotoriousMMA) <a href=”https://twitter.com/TheNotoriousMMA/status/1082105433450532866?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>January 7, 2019</a></blockquote>

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Boxing contemporaries Oscar De La Hoya and Saul “Canelo” Alvarez are among Mayweather detractors voicing their displeasure with Mayweather’s business moves and coincidently, they are also regarded as savvy businessmen and former Floyd opponents on the losing end.

Emphasis on losing, as both Alvarez and De La Hoya seek some form of redemption against Mayweather. Alvarez has even gone as far as questioning Mayweather’s merit for recent matches.

“He wants to continue hurting boxing by making fights that don’t make sense … and not giving boxing the credibility it deserves,” Alvarez told TMZ Sports a few months ago.

The question is, if Alvarez was in Mayweather’s position, would he do the same? Because De La Hoya and Alvarez challenged McGregor to a boxing match after he had his turn with Mayweather.

Another question for Alvarez is what type of validation do you seek facing a 41-year-old, naturally smaller, inactive fighter?

Fortunately Alvarez is scheduled to face fellow middleweight Daniel Jacobs this upcoming May, in a middleweight unification bout. Perhaps it would be best for Canelo to focus on middleweights and fighters his size.

Besides is it validation, by defeating Mayweather what Alvarezis seeking, or is it the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow? 

In many cases, the collective vitriol is a reflection of frustration from the inability to operate in the same manner. Mayweather operates with a ruling class mentality; in which assumes that he who holds the money, holds the power to shape his kingdom. And he holds the same power to impose his rules and orideology upon the society within the confines of his kingdom.

For those who obtain power and possess a certain mentality, they’re typically the ones to transcend the genre and establishnew rules. They set new trends for everyone else to follow.Sugar Ray Robinson, Sugar Ray Leonard, Tiger Woods, Serena Williams, Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant, LeBron James are also examples of such.

While it’s fair to suggest Mayweather emulated the styles of old school wrestlers Gorgeous George, Ric Flair and egotistical boxing personas like Hector “Macho” Camacho and a young Muhammad Ali, Mayweather elevated the notion of “Flossin” or “Stylin and profiling” to another level.  

“Conor stole the Floyd Mayweather gimmick to come out and talk about the money,” says mixed martial arts fighter and analyst Chael Sonnen, regarding Mayweather’s influence on McGregor.

But from the financial spectrum, arguably Mayweather capitalized more so than any other athlete in history – as far as maximizing earnings and maintaining a level of excellence performance wise. 

And with that precedent, its obvious McGregor and Alvarez,among many other athletes in some shape or form studied Mayweather’s every single move, from inside the ring and out.

It’s also a glaring reason why athletes (especially in combat sports) and celebrities associate with Mayweather when it comes to business. 

Which brings us back to the question of Mayweather’s current quest? The answer in which we already know; essentially the goal of every prize pugilist, fighting to secure the bag. 

Mayweather secured an enormous amount of bags during his time; recognized by Forbes in 2018 as the highest grossing entertainer, subsequently earning top spots lists of the 50 highest-paid athletes of 2012 and 2013, and the Forbes list again in both 2014 and 2015.

As far as his continued fighting career, it may continue in the form of exhibition. Even with exhibitions or “Glorified sparring sessions,” he maximizes that avenue with earning seven figures with his recent endeavor. Fights in the form of exhibition are where the fight trail ends.

It’s likely Mayweather, more than anyone recognizes his limitations as an elite level boxer and whether he can still compete at the highest level. There is drop-off and decline with every athlete as he or she ages. It’s the ongoing battle against Father Time. 

So while Pacquiao and more recently Marcos Maidana lay claims to seeking a rematch with Mayweather, a fight with either appears unlikely – unless the bag is too large to resist. 

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” data-lang=”en”><p lang=”es” dir=”ltr”>Marcos Maidana ha declarado que está&quot;regresando&quot; al boxeo al publicar un video extrañoen el que se ve enorme. No tengo idea de qué hacer al respecto, pero ha llamado a Floyd Mayweather, Manny Pacquiao, Canelo Alvarez y Amir Khan. <a href=”https://t.co/2JTn8tA8xQ”>pic.twitter.com/2JTn8tA8xQ</a></p>&mdash; edward kairl almarza (@kairllopez) <a href=”https://twitter.com/kairllopez/status/1082838490419732480?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>January 9, 2019</a></blockquote>

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With Pacquiao recently defeating former Mayweather protégé Adrien Broner, many speculate the rematch between the senator and the retired boxer/current promoter is in the works.

To his credit, even at the age of 40, Pacquiao displayed excellent skills and sharp reflexes in his victory over a fighter 11 years his junior. There still is an audience with the desire to see Pacquiao continue his quest, whatever that endeavors – and there still is an audience willing to pay attention to whichever moves Mayweather decides to make.

As long as the audience gives credence to the attention Mayweather seeks and he can secure a sizeable paycheck in the process, we will continue to see Mayweather do what he does best. Make money and make history. Whether that is in the form of fighting Pacquiao or promoting Pacquiao remains to be seen.

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Showtime PPV Round by Round Results: Pacquiao Dominates Broner Over 12 Rounds



By: William Holmes

The legendary Manny Pacquiao looked to keep his name relevant amongst the top fighters in the welterweight division as he took on Adrien Broner for the WBA “Regular” Welterweight Title in the main event of tonight’s Showtime PPV offering.

Three undercard bouts took place before the main event, and the last fight didn’t end until around 12:15PM.  A video package was shown beforehand further adding to the delay before to the start of the main event.  The national anthems were sung beforehand, first the Philippine national anthem followed by the national anthem of the United States.

The fighters began their walk into the ring at 12:34; with Broner entering first and Pacquiao entering second.

The following is a round by round recap of tonight’s main event. 

Photo Credit: Showtime Boxing Twitter Account

<strong>Manny Pacquiao (60-7-2) vs. Adrien Broner (33-3-1); WBA “Regular” Welterweight Title</strong>

Round 1:

Broner looks to be the bigger fighter of the two, even though Broner has historically fought at a lower weight.  Pacquiao rushes forward and Broner ties up.  Pacquiao rushes forward with another combination and Broner ties up.  Broner lands a short left lead hook.  Pacquiao is pushing his punches a little bit. Broner lands a straight right hand.  Pacquiao lands a straight left to the body.  Pacquiao lands a short right hook followed by a straight left to the body.  Pacquiao throws out a straight left hand to the head of Broner.  Broner may have tagged Pacquiao with a right uppercut.  Pacquiao misses with a jab to the head.  Pacquiao more active than Broner this round.

10-9 Pacquiao

Round 2:

Pacquiao looks a little slower today than in previous fights.  Pacquiao pressing Broner backwards.  Broner barely misses with a sweeping left hook.  Pacquiao paws out a few jabs, and Broner lands a good straight right hand.  Pacquiao lands with a jab and rushes forward with a combination.  Pacquiao rushes forward with a three punch combination and lands the last punch.  Pacquiao lands another quick jab.  Pacquiao rushes forward with a combination and Broner backs away.   Pacquiao lands a good double jab left hand.  Broner barely misses with a sharp straight right hand.  Pacquiao is going for the body but diving in a bit.  This was a closer round.

10-9 Pacquiao; 20-18 Pacquiao

Round 3:

Pacquiao is active with his jab so far, lands a good short hook to the body.  Broner misses with a check hook.  Pacquiao lands a good straight left hand before Broner clinches with him.  Pacquiao lands another straight left hand.  Broner barely misses with a lead straight right.  Broner lands a good jab followed by a straight right hand.  Pacquiao lands a good left to the body followed by a left hook upstairs.  Pacquiao lands another combination led by a jab.  Pacquiao lands another good jab followed by a right hook to the head.  Broner lands a good straight right hand.  Pacquiao lands a good power jab on Broner.  Pacquiao is very aggressive this round.

10-9 Pacquiao; 30-27 Pacquiao

Round 4:

Pacquiao is still the aggressor, but gets tagged with a good counter right hand when Pacquiao went to the body.  Pacquiao lands a good straight left to the body but Broner counters again.  Pacquiao lands a good straight right in the middle of a combination.  Pacquiao lands a good quick jab and closes the distance on Broner.  Broner is looking for his counter. Pacquiao gets tagged with another good straight right hand.  Broner lands another good straight right hand.  Pacquiao rushes forward and gets spun around.  Pacquiao lands a short jab.  Good check right hook by Broner and then Broner counters.  Good round for Broner.

10-9 Broner; 39-37 Pacquiao

Round 5:

Broner had a strong fourth round.  Broner throws out another good straight right hand to the head of Pacquiao.  Broner lands a good jab on Pacquiao.  Broner lands another straight right hand, but Pacquiao follows that with a good jab.  Broner barely misses with a left hook.  Pacquiao is landing with his right hand off his combinations.  Pacquiao jab I slooking better this round.  Pacquiao lands a left to the body.  Pacquiao lands a good left hook on Broner, and Broner answers with a jab.  Pacquiao barely misses with a left cross, but lands a quick combination afterwards.  Broner looks like he’s close to landing a power counter.

10-9 Pacquiao; 49-46 Pacquiao.

Photo Credit: Showtime Boxing Twitter Account

Round 6:

Pacquiao is pressing the fight and looking to get in close to Broner.  Pacquiao lands a  good quick combination.  Pacquiao lands a good straight left to the body of Broner.  Pacquiao lands another good left hook to the body.  Broner misses with a counter right hand.  Pacquiao lands another good left to the body.  Broner misses with a lead straight right.  Pacquiao with another straight left to the body.  Broner barely missing with his lead right hands.  Pacquiao lands a good jab, followed by a two punch combination.  Broner lands a good straight right.  Pacquiao answers with another left to the body.  Broner ends the round with a good two punch combination. 

10-9 Pacquiao; 59-55 Pacquiao

Round 7:

Pacquiao is pawing with his jab and throws another straight left hand to the body of Broner.  Broner barely misses with a straight right hand and Pacquiao barely misses with a straight left hand.  Pacquiao is pressing forward on Broner again.  Pacquiao is the first to throw most of the time when they are in range.  Pacquiao simply outworking Broner right now.  Broner lands a good right uppercut to the body of Pacquiao.  Pacquiao connects with a left on a rushing combination.  Pacquiao lands some good combinations on Broner with his back against the ropes and Broner tries to hold on.  Pacquiao lands another good left cross on Broner.  Pacquiao jumps on Broner by the corner and Broner holds on again.  Pacquiao lands another combination on Broner by the corner.  Very good round for Pacquiao.

10-9 Pacquiao; 69-64 Pacquiao

Round 8:

Pacquiao looks like he has a bounce in his step.  The crowd is loudly chanting for Pacquiao.  Broner lands a good counter right followed by an uppercut, but Pacquiao lands a good counter left hand off of that.  Pacquiao looks to be rushing his power shots a little bit.  Broner lands another good straight right hand.  Broner has his senses back.  Pacquiao double pumps a jab.  Pacquiao lands a good counter right hook and then goes to the body.  Pacquiao lands another good jab on Broner.  Pacquiao lands a short left hook.  Broner misses with a lead right hand.  Pacquiao lands a good left to the body of Broner.  Pacquiao lands another shot to the body of Broner.  Close round.

10-9 Pacquiao; 79-73 Pacquiao.

Round 9:

Pacquiao continues to be aggressive with his jab and his shots to the body.  Broner is missing his target by inches.  Pacquiao throws another straight left to the body.  Pacquiao lands a hard left hand on Broner who then shoots in on a single leg takedown.  Broner barely misses with a straight right counter again.  Broner lands a good counter right hand on Pacquiao.  Broner keeps his hands up high and lands a good counter straight right hand.  Pacquiao throws out a lead right hook .  Pacquiao lands a hard straight left hand on Broner and has Broner back to the ropes.  Pacquiao shows off his hand speed and lands some good combinations on Broner.  Broner ties up with Pacquiao. 

10-9 Pacquiao; 89-82 Pacquiao

Round 10:

Broner flicks out and lands a good jab.  Pacquiao lands a quick jab.  Pacquiao throws out a good straight left to the body.  Pacquiao has been showing good upper body movement all night.  Broner lands a good jab on Pacquiao.  Pacquiao lands a left to the body off of a combination.  Broner lands a good up jab on Pacquiao.  Pacquiao is really attacking to the body this fight.  The crowd is chanting for Pacquiao again.  Broner lands a good straight right hand on Pacquiao.  Broner connects with another good straight right hand.  Broner flicks out another counter left jab. Better round for Broner.

10-9 Broner; 98-92 Pacquiao

Round 11:

Broner probably needs a knockout to win the fight at this point.  Pacquiao lands a short jab.  Broner lands a good jab but issues with a combination afterwards.  Pacquiao lands a good counter left.  Broner is backing away from Pacquiao despite being down on the cards.  Pacquiao misses with a wild left hook.  Pacquiao lands a combination and Broner ties up.  Broner lands a good jab.  Pacquiao with a straight left to the body of Broner.  Broner misses with another straight right hand.  Pacquiao has Broner backing away.  Broner missing with his shots.  The crowd begins to boo Broner for bicycling away from Pacquiao.  Broner lands a decent counter right hand.  Broner was backing away most of the round.

10-9 Pacquiao; 108-101 Pacquiao

Round 12:

Final round of the fight and Broner thought he won the last round.  Pacquiao pressing forward and lands a straight left to the body.  Pacquiao lands a good left hand to the chin of Broner.  Broner misses with a straight right hand.  Pacquiao lands another short left hand.  Broner is circling away and lands a body shot, the referee warns him for a low blow.  Pacquiao rushes forward and Broner ties up again.  Pacquiao lands a good jab.  Broner misses with another jab on Pacquiao.  Broner has not been very accurate.  Pacquiao lands a two punch combination on Broner.  Pacquiao is still showing good movement at the age of forty after twelve hard rounds.  Broner raises his hands after the fight, but its hard to imagine him wining.

10-9 Pacquiao; 118-110 Pacquiao.

The finals scores were 117-111, 116-112, and 116-112 for Manny Pacquiao.

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Showtime PPV Boxing Results: Oubaali, Ruiz, and Browne Win Decisions


By: William Holmes

The MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nevada was the host site for tonight’s pay per view offering by Al Haymon’s Premier Boxing Champions. 

Several title fights were on this card in addition to the main event of Manny Pacquiao and Adrien Broner. 

The first bout of the night was between <strong>Hugo Ruiz (38-4) and Alberto Guevara (27-3)</strong> in the featherweight division. 

Ruiz was the taller and longer fighter of the two, and he had to face Guevara who had to step in as a last minute replacement, and his body looked like he hasn’t been training heavily in the past few weeks.

Ruiz was able to land two short right hands followed by two short left hooks in the first round that sent Guevara down to the mat, but he was unable to follow up on that and finish the fight early.

Photo Credit: Showtime Boxing Twitter Account

Ruiz was throwing a little more power into his shots in the second round, and was able to do good work to the body.  Ruiz continued to walk Guevara down in the third and fourth rounds, but he wasn’t throwing enough combinations to seriously hurt or threaten Guevara. 

Ruiz was warned for a low blow in the fifth round, but still landed more shots than Guevara despite the action slowing down.  Guevara was able to land some counters in the seventh round, but was fighting off his back foot in the eight round and was not throwing enough punches to win an otherwise winnable round. 

It looked like Guevara is fighting to just survive and not go for the win.  He has to know he’s behind on the scorecards but he didn’t take any risks in the final two rounds of the bout.

Ruiz wins a lackluster decision with scores of 100-89, 99-90, and 99-90.

The next fight of the night was between <strong>Nordine Oubaali (14-0) and Rau’shee Warren (16-2) (</strong> for the WBC Bantamweight title. 

Both Oubaali and Warren fought as southpaws, and they previously met in the Olympics when Oubaali was able to defeat Warren.

Warren showed good hand speed early on and Oubaali was a little short with his punches.  Warren’s jab was accurate early, and he may have had Oubaali a little hurt in the third round.

Photo Credit: Showtime Boxing Twitter Account

Oubaali began to turn the tide of the fight in his favor in the fourth round when he landed a counter left hand near the end of the round, and he had a strong fifth round with some check right hooks and lead right hands.

The sixth round was a close one, but Oubaali may have hurt Warren at the end of the round with a good left hand.  Warren unwisely got in a firefight with Oubaali in the seventh round and may have lost the round as a result.  Warren, to his credit, continued to exchange with Oubaali in the eighth round.

Warren pressed the pace in the ninth round but got tagged with some good power shots, and Oubaali was more accurate with his counter shots in the tenth round.

Warren likely stole the eleventh round with his activity and pressure, but it appeared to many he needed a knockout in the last round in order to pull out a win. 

That knockout didn’t come, but overall there were many close rounds.

The judges scored the fight 115-113, 116-112, and 117-111 for Nordine Ouaali.

The co-main event of the night was between <strong> Badou Jack (22-1-3) and Marcus Browne (22-0) </strong>for the WBA Interim Light Heavyweight Championship. 

Browne had the slight height and reach advantage on Jack and was able to use it to his advantage early on.  He pressed the pace more in the opening two rounds and kept control of the center of the ring.

Photo Credit: Showtime Boxing Twitter Account

Browne was able to land some good shots to the body in the third and fourth round, while Jack was unable to land any notable punches on Browne’s body or head.

Marcus Browne had a very good fifth round, he was able to land a strong left hook that had Jack hurt, but Browne didn’t press the pace and go for the knockdown.   Browne looked very confident going into the sixth round, and wasn’t bothered by Jack’s power at all

Browne opened up a cut in the middle of Jack’s forehead after a headbutt and was later deducted a point in the seventh round.  Browne was landing clean combinations in the eighth and ninth rounds, as the blood dripped from Jack’s forehead and he appeared to be losing his energy.

Badou Jack was able to make a brief comeback in the tenth round with a flurry of punches on Browne by the corner. Bit he wasn’t able to follow that up with any effective offense.

Jack looked like a defeated fighter going into the final two rounds of the fight, as Browne looked confident he was going to walk away the winner.  Browne went in for the kill in the final round as the blood was pouring out of Jack’s cut.  The ringside doctor came out to check Jack’s cut, but allowed him to continue.  Jack was able to finish out the fight, but he had a crimson mask of blood.

The final scores of the fight were 117-110, 116-111, and 119-108 for Marcus Browne.

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A Happy Manny Pacquiao is a Dangerous Manny Pacquiao


By Vishare Mooney

If that constant boxing adage, “a happy fighter is a dangerous fighter” is true, then Adrian Broner and the rest of boxing’s welterweight division may be facing a very dangerous Manny Pacquiao. And these days, Manny Pacquiao has many reasons to be happy going into the ring at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas tonight (SHOWTIME, PPV 9 p.m. ET).

It has been a fun media week and we have seen a lighter side to Pacquiao than in previous fights. There was a joyful air of reunion last week in Los Angeles at the media workout at Wild Card Gym where he hugged Freddie Roach and goofed it up, throwing fake jabs at trainer and boyhood friend Buboy Fernandez. There were the hilarious Saturday Night Live-like skits played out on social media with comedian Michael Blackson. (look up @michealblackson on the Gram, it’s brilliant). In each skit, already with over 650,000 views, Blackson acts as translator to Manny’s very polite responses to reporter questions. When asked his predictions for the fight, Pacquiao replies, “I’m not predicting the fight but I will do my best” and Blackson translates, “What he (Manny) really means to say is, man that’s some bullsh–, he’s gonna really f— this boy up…” Blackson goes on and on while Manny smiles sheepishly alongside him. And a joyful Manny, even up until yesterday’s weigh in as Manny tries to muster seriousness at face off, a smile breaks and he pats Broner on his bum as they turn around. We have a very happy, relaxed PacMan today. And why not?

Age is just a number, here is the man

Pacquiao, at 40 years old, in the 70th bout of his storied professional career, coming off a convincing TKO against Lucas Matthysse to regain the WBA welterweight title once more and comfortably settling into the welterweight division… PacMan, who will reportedly earn upwards of 20 million in purse money and marketing profits tonight, his first fight with new promoter Al Haymon and PBC.. Manny, who launched his career in 1995, when Broner and his welterweight peers were in preschool, motivated perhaps to show the young lions who is king, and still.. To many Filipinos, he is the People’s Champ, the boy who grew up in extreme poverty who is a living world boxing legend and two term congressman in the Philippines, and since 2016, Senator Pacquiao, whose boxing wins only add to fuel his political ambition..

We got a healthy fighter

No one knows Pacquiao better than his inner circle, his coaches and friends, Freddie Roach, Buboy Fernandez and Justin Fortune who are often candid about their assessment of their fighters. Fortune and Roach have said Pacquiao may have overtrained for the Horn fight, and adjustments were made to Pacquiao’s training; they have taken a more conservative approach to fight camp; a concerted effort to increase Manny’s recovery time. Results of that change showed clearly in the subsequent win over Matthysse. All three have said to this writer, that it is Pacquiao, whose drive to train relentlessly, often has to be tempered. I asked Manny why he has been able to stay in top shape his entire 23 year career and rest was not included in his answer. “I would like to thank God for this good health. Basically its discipline, real discipline and hard work, that’s the most important thing,” said Pacquiao.

“He knows he needs rest but it’s very hard for him to accept it,” says Roach. Nonetheless, when asked what elements of Manny’s skill has he retained over time, Fortune replied, “All of them. Speed, power, footwork – hasn’t stopped, that’s why he is still where he is at 40. He’s ridiculously fast on his feet, still fast, still strong on his hands.” Manny thanks God, his trainers thank Rest. It’s always a negotiation.

Motivation Beyond Boxing

With maturity often comes wisdom and perhaps Pacquiao has allowed himself to continue to do what he loves to do, which is to fight and help his countrymen. Those two goals are sincere,indisputable and linked. Pacquiao has proven time and again his good intentions for his people. He has gone beyond handing out hard cash to Filipinos (which he still does apparently) to serving public office and advancing a more change for his country. And now he has found a way in to stay in the boxing world beyond his career by launching his own namesake boxing promotions company MP Promotions. Someday, a long, long time from now, Manny hopes to see himself among the young stable of Filipino fighters he is grooming.

Why is Manny Pacquiao so happy? Because he sees the end game. And what a happy place it can be.

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Pacquiao-Broner: The Final Analysis


By Charles Jay
Exclusive to Boxing Insider

As I engage in this competition called “Wager War,” where we bet on anything and everything (calm down – it’s for “entertainment purposes only”), naturally one of the things we have to lay some coin down on is boxing. And so the latest challenge becomes deciding which way to go on this fight between Manny Pacquiao and Adrien Broner.

Do you remember, once upon a time, when this was being discussed as one of those potential “mega-fights”? It’s still significant, but after Broner suffered a few defeats, the luster kind of went out of the whole thing.

But now there they are, at the MGM Grand on Saturday night, and we have this in front of us as a proposition of at least some intrigue, because we get to speculate what will happen with Pacquiao, win or lose. Would he retire if he lost to Broner? Would he move on to fight a grand finale with Floyd Mayweather is he emerged victorious?

These are the numbers I am working with for this scheduled 12-rounder:

Manny Pacquiao -360
Adrien Broner +280

Over 10.5 Rounds -280
Under 10.5 Rounds +220

The first thing that has to be addressed is, “Does Broner have enough talent to beat Pacquiao?” Yes, he does, in terms of the ability he has at his disposal. But having the talent and having the wherewithal to apply it can be two vastly different things. He has not shined brightly when he has faced his biggest challenges, although when he is in over his head he still manages to hang around. The losses to Marcos Maidana, Shawn Porter and Mikey Garcia were not necessarily close on the judges’ cards, although he hasn’t exactly folded the tent when he’s been hit.

But he has been out-worked in those bouts, not to mention one against Paul Malignaggi in which the decision went his way. And he lacks a certain discipline, if you want to consider these bizarre brushes with the law to be any indication. So yes, he could probably match skills with Pacquiao, but does he have that “something extra” that’s going to get him over the finish line first?

As for Pacquiao, well, they picked a pretty ideal opponent for him to come back against (Lucas Matthysse), so I don’t necessarily want to use that to determine the level of punching power he is prepared to bring. He had gone through nine wins and almost a decade since he had previously stopped anybody (Miguel Cotto in 2009), and really, he has looked like somebody who either didn’t really have a lot of power at 147 or wasn’t confident enough in going after the knockout to leave himself open to being countered.

I seriously doubt that Broner is going to knock out Pacquiao, but I’m not sure that would make the current WBA “regular” champion more brazen. He will exhibit more “will” than Broner, but if he starts to really dominate things I have a feeling Broner will go into “survival mode.”

An in-shape Pacquiao, even at 40, should be too busy for Broner to pile up enough points on the cards. But let’s turn this around and say that even if Broner were the guy emerging victorious, I don’t think he would do it any other way than on a decision. Ultimately, we’ll lay the -280 that this fight gets to the halfway mark of the eleventh round and beyond, and we also put something down on Pacquiao to win by decision – a proposition that is priced at -125.

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Pacquiao-Broner: Some Bets Around the Net


By Charles Jay
Exclusive to Boxing Insider

Are you getting ready to go out (or stay home, as it were) and watch the Manny Pacquiao-Adrien Broner fight? If you are, maybe you are wondering where you might be able to place a friendly wager on it.

Well, it’s not necessarily the policy here at Boxing Insider to be promoting the online sportsbooks, but we can give you an idea of which way the wind is blowing, and then you can get over to a service like Oddschecker and find out the numbers from all over the world.

For certain, it looks as if the Pacquiao money has been coming in over the last few days. There are a few books, in fact, that have him as high as -400 (where you lay 4/1), and we see some -350 out there. But we can say with some conviction that everybody has him at least a 3/1 (-300) favorite. And that was not the case earlier in the week.

As far as the price coming back on Broner, we’ve seen mostly anywhere from +250 to +270, although you can find a better price if you like him. We have seen one US-facing site (i.e., one that services customers from the United States) that has him priced at +300. So perhaps, if you are a Broner backer, this is as good a time to strike as any.

Then there is the Over-Under. And it goes without saying that if you really search, you can find a price on just about any distance you’re looking for. The standard is 10.5 rounds (i.e., the 1:30 mark of the 11th – don’t get confused), and the consensus, as we have found it, is a -300 price on the “over,” although one prominent destination had it -250 when we last looked. As far as the “under,” we’ve seen a price as high as +240.

If you don’t think the fight is going the distance, and want to get particular about it, there are a lot of ways to go. For example, you can wager on either fighter ending things in a specific round or group of rounds. To illustrate, Pacquiao has been posted at one random sportsbook we looked at +1100 (11/1) to win in the group of rounds 4-to-6.

And the exact outcome is also a subject of much action. For Pacquiao to win by decision or technical decision (where a cut or injury ends it and they go to the scorecards), it is basically an even money proposition, although you would have to lay a small price (-105 or -110) at a few places. As far as Pacquiao ending things inside the distance (KO or TKO, and also including a DQ win), we’ve seen a +300 (3/1) price out there.

As the underdog, Broner gets higher prices than that, naturally. For him to win on a decision or technical decision, the best number we saw was +575, although mostly you’re looking at anywhere from +450 (9/2) to +500 (5/1). And the “Broner by KO, TKO or DQ” prop carries a +650 consensus, though we do see +700 sprinkled around out there.

Then there is the more unusual stuff. If you want to wager on either fighter getting knocked down and then coming back to win the fight, prices on that kind of thing are available. We looked at one sportsbook outlet where Pacquiao was +800 (8/1) to do that and Broner was +2100 (21/1). And there are a few select places where you can actually bet that BOTH fighters will hit the deck, and we’ve seen both 6/1 (+600) and 7/1 (+700) for that.

In what is being called “Gone in 60 Seconds” but could also be referred to as the “Don’t Go to the Refrigerator” prop, there are prices out there on both Pacquiao (150/1) and Broner (200/1) to end the proceedings within 60 seconds.

My own personal opinion – play this prop and the only thing gone in sixty seconds would be your cash.

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What is Manny Pacquiao Fighting For?


By: Kirk Jackson

What is the boxer/politician fighting for? That’s one of the questions looming prior to the first major pay-per-view event of the year featuring one of the legends of boxing, Manny “Pac-Man” Pacquiao 60-7-2 (39 KO’s).

The Pac-Man hopes to have an answer for “The Problem” that is Adrien Broner 33-3-1, 1 NC (24 KO’s). While boxing’s most famous politician is fighting for the prize obviously, what exactly is the prize he is fighting for?

According to paperwork filed with the Nevada State Athletic Commission, Pacquiao’s purse is $10 million, plus a percentage of the profits from the pay-per-view event.

Multiple sources confirmed to BoxingScene.com and other media outlets, Pacquiao’s total purse from fighting Broner will generate at least $20 million. The Pac-Man will earn $10 million Saturday night, from which will pay towards federal income taxes and taxes to help settle outstanding debt with the Internal Revenue Service.

Other financial particulars comprise of expenses such as sanctioning fees for defending the WBA’s Regular world welterweight title and wages towards members of his team. However, a silver lining for Pacquiao is the money he will earn from various revenue streams – including Filipino television rights, American pay-per-view revenue from Showtime and sponsorships.

The earning of multi-millions is quite the prize, but the other rewards Pacquiao is fighting for does not have a price tag.

Pacquiao is fighting for his people – as he is affectionately known as the fighting pride of the Philippines and he is fighting in a sense to represent older athletes and show he still has the juice (no pun intended).

“Life begins at 40,” exclaimed Pacquiao at his gala leading up to the fight. “Physically, I still feel like I am 25, but with the benefit of the wisdom that comes from the added years of my life experience. I still have a lot I want to accomplish as an athlete, a public servant, and a father, husband and son. I look forward to adding more chapters to my life story.”

Also now more than ever, Pacquiao is fighting with a sense of freedom. No longer bound by the invisible lasso of Top Rank Promotions, that prohibited Pacquiao from matching up against some of the best opposition at welterweight in recent years.

Pacquiao secured greater fight freedom upon signing with the perceived enemy – at least amongst many members of the media, Al Haymon.

Pacquiao now has the opportunity to fight Keith Thurman, Errol Spence, Shawn Porter, Mikey Garcia or Danny Garcia. He could even fight long-time adversary Floyd Mayweather if he is tempted to return from retirement.

“That’s the thinking in my mind and my heart — that there will be another [Mayweather] fight,” Pacquiao acknowledged last week in an interview with the Times.

The opinion from most boxing observers is Pacquiao will defeat Broner. Theoretically if Pacquiao wins, what is next for him?

Assuming he doesn’t suffer too much damage against Broner, Pacquiao more than likely will be well suited to fight again late spring/early summer. With all of these options, which road is Pacquiao most likely to follow?

To figure that out, we must observe history. Although Pacquiao has a great resume and will be remembered as a great fighter and one of the best fighters from his era, there are many instances where the easier path was selected. This is a part of the sport, part of the business and many fighters dating back to the Jack Johnson days operated under this pretense.

Whether Pacquiao fights his other Premier Boxing Champions compatriots remains to be seen. In recent memory for years ongoing, there was the highly anticipated, vastly discussed match-up between Pacquiao and fellow Top Rank stable mate Terence Crawford, but it never materialized.

Even recently Pacquiao mentioned how he would handle the likes of welterweight monster Errol Spence and one has to wonder if it’s just talk or a possible reality?

For Pacquiao, the last three opponents leading up to Broner were Lucas Matthysse, Jeff Horn and Jessie Vargas.

Matthyesse was past his prime, Horn and Vargas are very good fighters but probably a tier below the top welterweights.

In spite of Pacquiao and his team speaking highly of the 40-year-old’s talents and physical abilities even at this advanced age, it’s difficult to imagine Pacquiao as an elite level fighter equipped to tackle the monsters at welterweight.

At this stage, Pacquiao doesn’t have anything to prove and he’s at a stage where he can reap the benefits of his reputation in the twilight of his career. As far as we know, Pacquiao now more so than ever has the executive freedom to do so. There isn’t a mandate for Pacquiao to fight the monsters at welterweight.

This fight is an illustration of such. But it can be also viewed as a barometer as to what Pacquiao can still do.

Yes Pacquiao is fighting to prove a point about age, he’s fighting for money (as every fighter should) and he’s fighting to secure the future of his fighters under his promotional company.

“I’m working with Al Haymon and consulting him for this big opportunity for me and my boxers that I have in the Philippines,” Pacquiao said of the reach Haymon has in the boxing industry, coupled with his deals with Fox and Showtime. “You know, so it’s a big opportunity for them.”

“I’m not thinking about myself alone, but I’m thinking about my fighters. I have a lot of fighters in the Philippines, at least 50 boxers, and I want them to have a chance here, in America, to fight.”

The perfect opponent for Pacquiao to make his PBC debut is against Broner. While Broner is one of boxing’s exuberant personalities, he far removed as being regarded as one of boxing’s best fighters.

While Broner is extremely talented, his talent may have also served as his biggest hindrance. When a fighter is naturally gifted, things have a tendency to come easier; more naturally. In some cases, the talented individual may not hone the skills necessary to stay at an elite level and perform consistently to their greatest ability.

Broner displayed exploits of greatness in previous fights, but also performed poorly; underwhelming even, when the spotlight was on him. He’s the unpredictable variable.

“With Adrien, the curiosity is you never know what you’re gonna get out of him,” Showtime analyst and former Broner opponent Paulie Malignaggi told BoxingScene.com. “You can never predict him, and unpredictability is a very big key to marketing.”

“When you never can figure out the answer to somebody – he’s ‘The Problem,’ and nobody has the answer. You never know what mood he’s in or if he’s being genuine or disingenuous. You never know if he’s joking or he’s serious. But the bottom line is he can fight. If you can’t fight and you’re a boxer, none of the other intangibles will matter. People tend to forget in all this that the kid can fight.”

Just as people are writing off Broner, Pacquiao experienced the same after falling to Horn in 2017.

“People writing me off after the Jeff Horn fight was good for me. I’m not mad at anyone who thought that. It just became a challenge and a test to me of whether or not I could still show my best,” said Pacquiao.

“The knockout in my last fight felt good. It felt like my younger days against Ricky Hatton, Miguel Cotto and others. That fight was a big challenge for me to recover from the fight against Jeff Horn. People said that my career was done. But I never got discouraged, I just worked hard and made the knockout against Lucas Matthysse happen.

Whether Manny can capture that knock-out magic against Broner remains to be witnessed. While he’s fighting with divine purpose, a defeat does not hinder Pacquiao.

His legacy is already cemented and everything earned this upcoming bout and beyond is the cherry on top.

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Adrien Broner vs. Manny Pacquiao – Alternative Angle


By: Kirk Jackson

Conventional wisdom suggests Manny “The Pac-Man” Pacquiao 60-7-2 (39 KO’s) is going to defeat Adrien “The Problem” Broner 33-3-1, 1 NC (24 KO’s) this weekend. But many variables are at play and the victor will not be pre-determined on paper. As the old adages suggest; one punch can end or change the fight and fights are not won on paper.

This is the fight both fighters need. While this fight will not necessarily establish the victor as an elite fighter in the welterweight division, the winner of this fight captures relevance and remains a large financial factor in boxing’s most competitive division.

Surveying many fighters, fans and majority members of the media, most pick Pacquiao to emerge victorious.

Given each fighter’s reputation, it’s a fair assessment however, this is not a walk in the park for either fighter.

In spite of the criticism (much of it warranted), Broner has a better record than what the media implies. He is a four division world champion and although it’s easy to suggest he has not performed to his potential, his losses were against elite competition.

Marcos Maidana was a tough, rugged, powerful-punching former world champion. Shawn Porter is a two time world champion and the current WBC welterweight champion of the world. Mikey Garcia is undefeated, four division world champion and widely considered as one of the best pound-for-pound fighters in the world.

Broner has the speed, power and boxing ability to defeat Pacquiao. But if this most recent version of “The Problem” is to remain impenetrable, he must shed the reputation of “Underachiever.”

The success of Broner may depend on which version of Pacquiao we see Saturday night. Will we see the fighter who looked great against Lucas Matthyesse – who admittedly at this stage of his career was past his prime and custom made to order? Or will we see the Pacquiao who faced Jeff Horn; still explosive but sporadic fighting in spots and at times inaccurate and unfocused?

The question begs is Pacquiao still an elite fighter? Is the basis of Pacquiao’s current label of elite level distinction predicated on reputation and glorious memories of the past, rather than recent performance and reality?

There’s old boxing adage, “You’re only as good as your last fight,” but the last fight may not tell the entire tale of the fight to follow. Relying on reputation may not always be the way to go either.

Showtime boxing analyst and recent recipient of Broner’s ire Al Bernstein compared the last five fights of Pacquiao and Broner. Bernstein stated Broner oddly enough has a higher punch output compared to Pacquiao.

The comparison of fights consists of various variables that manipulate the punch output statistic, but it’s interesting to imagine when comparing the two fighters as Pacquiao is generally perceived as the busier fighter.

Broner is extremely accurate and if he is the fighter come Saturday night with the higher punch output, his odds bode well.

“Look at my last five fights. I’ve fought world champion after world champion. I don’t duck any fights. I don’t care how many weight classes he’s won titles in,” said Broner in an interview leading up to Saturday’s fight.

Broner and Pacquiao share a common opponent in Jessie Vargas and both have different results with Pacquiao defeating Vargas and Broner fighting to an even draw with Vargas.

While it’s not an indication as to how Pacquiao vs. Broner will play-out, it’s interesting to note both Pacquiao and Broner arguably trailed early and finished strong. Will each fighter display this trait in their eventual encounter?

Although Pacquiao fought a grandmaster of the ring in Mayweather back in 2015, a fighter who perfected the shoulder roll defense Broner attempts to emulate, it doesn’t mean the fight against Broner will turn out the same way for Pacquiao.

Meaning Pacquiao may be more successful due to the difference in skill level between Mayweather and Broner. “The Problem” emulates certain aspects of Mayweather’s persona and fight style, but they fight completely different.

Broner appears more explosive with his punches compared to Mayweather and there’s a difference in footwork between the two. Many critics deem Broner as flat-footed.

Although the shoulder roll defense is not recommend by many experts as the defense of choice for an orthodox fighter against a southpaw, there’s a good chance Broner will utilize that style of defense at some point during his fight against Pacquiao.

Regarding the shoulder roll and other defensive tactics there is also a vast difference between Broner and Mayweather noticed by some of boxing’s great fighters and trainers alike.

Andre Ward discussing Mayweather’s shoulder roll (credit The Ring):

“You can use that move in different ways. If you look back at Floyd Mayweather Sr.’s fights, he used it a lot. You can see him use it pretty frequently in his fight with Sugar Ray Leonard, which I think is still available on YouTube. Obviously, he wasn’t as good at it as Floyd Jr. is now, but you see where his son got it from. Roger Mayweather [Floyd Jr.’s uncle and his former trainer] used it a bit, too, but his style was slightly different. Roger was more offense-minded.”

“The point I’m trying to make is that Floyd got that move almost from birth. That’s the difference between him and guys who try to emulate him. Yeah, some fighters do well with it in spots. You can borrow bits and pieces from other fighters. That can be a good thing. But if you try to copy someone’s complete style, I’ve never seen that work. Floyd Jr. began mastering the shoulder roll from the get-go. It’s who he is; by now it comes naturally to him.”

Teddy Atlas discussing differences between Mayweather and Broner (credit The Ring):

“Mayweather knows when to use [the shoulder roll] and when not to. He doesn’t depend only on that. It’s just an element within his body of work. I think it’s the other parts that also go into the sum of who and what he is. It’s the other parts that allow him to be effective.”

“Where Broner went wrong was having a psychological attachment to a great fighter’s most notable move. But true originals find constancy in something. Imitators are only hoping to find that. They don’t have complete assurance it will bring them to that next level. Mayweather’s already at that level.”

Eddie Mustafa Muhammad on Broner and Mayweather (credit The Ring):

“The shoulder roll is basically a defensive move. If you throw a right hand at Floyd, he tucks his chin behind his left shoulder, turns to his right and is in good position to counter. A lot of fighters do that. But Floyd does it to perfection because he’s been doing it for so long, and he does it so exceptionally well. Really, it’s not the move that makes Floyd such a great fighter. It’s his talent level.”

“I mean, look at Adrien Broner’s fight against Maidana. Broner tried to imitate Floyd’s shoulder roll, and he liked to get himself killed. Why? Because Adrien Broner is not Floyd Mayweather. There’s only one Floyd Mayweather.”

Speaking of Mayweather, it’s not guaranteed he will return from retirement to fight Pacquiao, as is it’s not guaranteed Pacquiao will defeat Broner.

Although Mayweather has a well-documented history of retiring, coming out of retirement, rinse and repeat; it’s fair to suggest Mayweather will no longer compete on the high end circuit of professional boxing.

Again, Pacquiao and Broner still have to show at this stage of their respective careers if they’re still fighters, but Mayweather seems primed to fight on the exhibition circuit – only if the opportunity arises.

It’s uncertain, perhaps unlikely, Mayweather fights Pacquiao if the Filipino star emerges victorious. It’s difficult to determine if there would be enough demand to dictate a rematch.

Which brings into question, the other alternative. What if Broner wins?

“People are talking a lot about Pacquiao fighting Floyd Mayweather again, but I’m pretty sure Floyd is retired. I feel like people are trying to throw me to the wolves and overlook me,” Broner said in a press conference with Showtime.

“He doesn’t remind me of any past opponents just like I’m not going to remind him of anyone he’s fought. He’s never fought anyone like me. Every fighter has similarities, but truly every fighter is different. If I remind him of Floyd Mayweather, I hope his arm doesn’t hurt after this one.”

A victory for the Cincinnati native propels him into super-stardom. It may play out to be the case of young lion conquers older lion.

In the past, Broner was used as the perpetual stepping stone en route to Mayweather – see Marcos Maidana. But Adrien now has the chance to cast himself from that shadow.

Broner has the opportunity to take the mantle as one of boxing’s true super-stars and the Premier Boxing Champions movement headed by Al Haymon is the perfect platform for him.

What’s the effect of another defeat for Pacquiao? His legacy will not be affected. For Broner, although many cast their story upon him, there are still many chapters to add to his book.

If you ask Pacquiao, he is still adding chapters to his ever-growing book.

“Life begins at 40,” exclaimed Pacquiao at his pre-fight celebration leading up to the fight. “Physically, I still feel like I am 25, but with the benefit of the wisdom that comes from the added years of my life experience. I still have a lot I want to accomplish as an athlete, a public servant, and a father, husband and son. I look forward to adding more chapters to my life story.”

Each fighter is appears motivated and has a great opportunity Saturday night to kick-start 2019 in grand fashion. Who will claim victory and who will lay claim to the year?

Which fighter is poised to angle their self in proper position?

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Top Rank Boxing Results: Rivas Stops Jennings in 12th


By: Ken Hissner

Bob Arum’s Top Rank Boxing on ESPN+ featured two heavy hitters Friday in the heavyweight division at Turning Stone Resort & Casino, in Verona, NY, as Philadelphia’s Bryant “By-By” Jennings was upset in a close fight in the twelfth and final round by 2008 Olympian Colombian Oscar “Kaboom” Rivas. This bout waa for Jennings IBF International and the WBO NABO heavyweight titles.

In the Main Event Philadelphia’s Bryant “By-By” Jennings, 24-3 (14), was defeated by NABF champion Colombian Oscar “Kaboom” Rivas, 26-0 (18), out of Montreal, CAN, at 0:54 of the twelfth and final round.
In the first round it was Rivas coming forward with Jennings landing his jab.


Photo Credit Turning Stone Resort Casino

In the opening round Rivas landed a combination to the head of Jennings. Jennings countered with a left hook to the body of Rivas. Rivas with hands held high to block the jabs of Jennings who is much faster with hands and feet and an 84” reach. In the second round it was Jennings with hands held high and Rivas still coming forward going to the body. Both fighters exchanged left hooks to the head. Rivas landed a solid left hook to the body of Jennings. Rivas drove Jennings against the ropes with body shots. Rivas landed a hard left hook to the chin of Jennings at the bell.

In the third round Rivas came out throwing punches with determination to hurt Jennings. He landed a lead right between the gloves of Jennings. Jennings used his reach with a jab but not much coming from his right hand. In the fourth round Jennings came out with more behind his jab. Rivas landed a right uppercut to the chin of Jennings. Rivas put Jennings up against the ropes with combinations.

Jennings hasn’t shown anything more than a jab so far.

In the fifth round Rivas immediately went to the body. Jennings landed more punches with his jab but Rivas landed the power punches. Jennings kept moving using his jab and an occasional left hook to the body. In the sixth round Jennings finally opened up in the middle of the ring landing jabs and several rights to the chin of Rivas. Jennings landed a good left hook to the head of Rivas. Jennings led with a left hook followed by a right to the chin of Rivas. The movement of Jennings seemed to bother Rivas.
In the seventh round Rivas landed a triple jab with Jennings countering with a right to the chin. Rivas landed an overhand right to the chin of Jennings. Jennings came back with an overhand right to the head of his own. In the last 10 seconds of the round though pinned against the ropes it was Jennings landing punches.

In the eighth round Jennings landed five unanswered punches to the body and head of Rivas. Jennings was walking Rivas back until Rivas landed a right to the chin. Rivas landed a lead right to the body of Jennings. Jennings began to chase Rivas who seemed to be slowing down.

In the ninth round Rivas used his jab until a left hook from Jennings landed on his jaw. Rivas landed several punches to the body and head of Jennings. Both had their best exchange of the fight up to this point. It was a close round in a close fight. In the tenth round Rivas landed a 3-punch combination driving Jennings against the ropes. Rivas landed a straight right through the gloves of Jennings on the chin.

In the eleventh round Jennings landed a double left hook to the body and head of Rivas. Rivas got a warning from referee Gary Rosato about hitting behind the head. Rivas landed a solid overhand right to the jead of Jennings who came back with a right of his own.

In the twelfth and final round Rivas came out with a flurry of punches dropping Jennings. Rivas went on the attack having Jennings defenseless against the ropes with referee Rosato wisely stopping it.
This writer had it 6-5 in rounds for Rivas going into the last round. Two of the scorecards had it for Rivas.

“In the twelfth and final round my trainer Marc Ramsey told me how hard I worked in training running up the mountain. I figured out I needed the left hook to end this fight,” said Rivas.
“I’m a whole man now. Of course I’m disappointed. It is what it is,” said Jennings.

In the co-feature 21 year-old 2016 Olympic Silver Medalist No. 11 ranked IBF Super Featherweight southpaw Shakur “Fearless” Stevenson, 10-0 (6), out of Brick City, Newark, NJ, looked sensational stopping Jesse “Jimdomar” Cris “VIP” Morales, 22-2-1 (10), of Cebu City, in the Philippines, at 1:29 of the fourth round winning the vacant IBF Inter-Continental and vacant WBC Continental Americas featherweight titles.

In the first round Morales came forward with Stevenson using his jab. Stevenson lands a combination to the head of Morales. Stevenson lands a 3-punch combination to the head of Morales. Stevenson landed a flurry of punches without return. Morales hardly landed a punch thru the round. In the second round dedicating this fight to his cousin who passed away recently Stevenson is all business. Morales came forward walking into punch after punch. There was blood on the hair line of Morales. Stevenson has been punching at will. Morales has had some success going to the body but nothing to the head.

In the third round Stevenson drives Morales to the ropes with head punches. Morales had nothing to come back with. A left uppercut to the body hurt Morales. Morales came back with a right to the body. In the fourth round Morales comes out landed a right to the chin of Stevenson bringing a smile from the Olympian. Both fighters are going to the body as Stevenson drives Morales into the ropes and drops him with a left uppercut followed by a straight left to the chin. Referee Charlie Fitch gave him the 8 count but Morales was in no condition to continue as the fight is waved off as it should have been.

“I’m on the right track listening to my corner (grandfather). I want to go to the English side and fight there and fight Josh Warrington, 28-0 (6), for his IBF title,” said Stevenson. His promoter Bob Arum agreed.

Super Welterweight Dominican Carlos Adames, 16-0 (13), out of Washington Heights, NY, knocked out Venezuela’s Juan “El Nino” Ruiz, 21-4 (13), out of Tijuana, MEX, at 1:57 of the third round of a scheduled ten. The referee was Charlie Fitch.

Former WBA Super Featherweight champion now No. 6 by the WBC Jason “El Canito” Sosa, 22-3-4 (15), of Camden, NJ, in a brawl from bell to bell each scoring knockdowns defeated Moises “Gatti” Delgadillo, 18-19-2 (9), out of Guadalajara, MEX, over 10 rounds.

In the opening round Sosa kept coming forward but received a cut on the bridge of his nose halfway thru the round. This has been a real slugfest on both parts. In the second round Sosa landed a double left hook to the body and Delgadillo countering a left hook to the body. This could have been fought in a phone booth. No one tried slipping a punch. A left hook from Delgadillo had Sosa wobbling and down. Referee Gary Rosato gave him the 8 count as the bell sounded.
In the third round a right hand to the head of Sosa rocked him. Sosa came right back slipping a punch landing a left hook causing swelling under the left eye of Delgadillo. They matched punch for punch throughout the entire three rounds. In the fourth round Sosa starts out moving around becoming the counter puncher until he got hit causing him to return to the slugfest. There have been few jabs. The fans are loving it. Sosa finally back Delgadillo up with a flurry of punches. One of the rare clinches for the referee seconds before the bell sounded. You can throw out the record of Delgadillo in this one.

In the fifth round Sosa starts out with a left hook followed by a double jab to the haw of Delgadillo. Sosa lands a lead right to the chin of Delgadillo. They exchanged left hooks to the head. Delgadillo was warned for a low left hook. In the sixth round Delgadillo landed a 4-punch combination to the body and head of Sosa. There have been few misses in this one. Sosa backed up Delgadillo with a good body attack.

In the seventh round both landed right’s to the head. This has been a throwback fight like back in the day. Sosa landed a right to the chin and a left hook to the body dropping Delgadillo who beat the count at 9. Delgadillo got up and grabbed Sosa still being hurt. Delgadillo was bent over trying to protect from body shots. He had swelling under his right eye. It was a big round for Sosa in this one.

In the eighth round these two warriors went right back at it. A right uppercut from Sosa to the body hurt Delgadillo but he came right back. When Sosa landed a lead right he got countered by a Delgadillo left hook time and again. The exchanged punches from bell to bell.

In the ninth round with both throwing punches a Sosa right to the chin rocked Delgadillo who comes right back.

Delgadillo’s face us a swelling mess but he knows no quitting coming back with a w-punch combo to the body and head.
In the tenth and final round both continue throwing and landing punches.

Sosa landed a right to the side of the neck of Delgadillo. Sosa landed a hard right at the bell. Both fighters hugged and smiled at each other in respect. What a fight!

Scores were Don Ackerman 96-92 and with Tom Schreck and John McKaie having it 97-91 with this writer having it 95-93.
Three time Olympian, 2016 Olympic Gold and Pan Am Gold Medalist with over 400 amateur fights Super Featherweight Robson “Nino” Conceicao, 11-0 (5), of Salvador, BRZ, scored a shutout over Hector “El Estudiante” Ambriz, 12-9-2 (6), out of Ensenada, MEX, over 8 rounds.

In the first round Conceicao the aggressor landed a right to the head and left hook to the body of Ambriz.

Conceicao landed a pair of rights to the body of Ambriz. Ambriz kept moving as Conceicao chased and landed well with his right hand. In the second round an overhand right from Conceicao landed on the side of the head of Ambriz who complained of a rabbit punch for the third time in the fight. Ambriz landed a counter combination to the head of Conceicao. A Conceicao jab knocked back the head of Ambriz who was backing up.
In the third round Conceicao continues looking for a knockout with Ambriz moving at all times. Conceicano landed a lead right uppercut to the chin of Ambriz.

Conceicano landed a right to the head but the left hook to the body was a crushing blow. Ambriz comes back with much lighter punches evading the big blow.

In the fourth round with the corner of Conceicano urging him to knockout his opponent he came out throwing bombs. Ambriz was not an easy target with his movement making Conceicano miss three punches while countering back with a combo of his own. It was the best round for Ambriz whether he won it or not. In the fifth round a right from Conceicano to the chin rocked Ambriz. A wide right from Conceicano to the head knocked Ambriz off balance.

In the sixth round Ambriz came out with swelling around his right eye from many rights from Conceicano. Conceicano landed a solid left hook to the chin of Ambriz. Ambriz comes back with jabs but doesn’t have the power to compete with Conceicano but a good heart.

Between rounds Conceicano was standing. In the seventh round Conceicano landed a rare body punch from a left hook. Ambriz right eye swelling showed a small cut. It was a close round with Ambriz not winning one but always in there. Conceicano has been pressing for a knockout that is not coming.

In the eighth and final round Ambriz missed a combination with Conceicano landed a right to the head. All his punches are arm punches as Ambriz is determined to go the distance. Both landed right hands to the chin. Ambriz landed four punches with Conceicano covering up. Conceicano won every round but just a win not an impressive one. Referee Benjy Esteves, Jr. did his usual fine job.

Scores were 80-72 as was this writer’s.

Super Lightweight southpaw Fazlidden Gaibnazarov, 8-0 (3), of UZB out of L.A., CA, stopped Dominican Ricardo Garcia, 14-6-1 (9), out of Reading, PA, who retired at the end of four rounds of an 8. Referee was Benjy Esteves, Jr.

Heavyweight Cassius Chaney, 14-0 (8), out of New London, CT, Michael Glasscox, 6-2-2 (5), of Columbus, OH,
Making his debut 2016 Olympian Middleweight Vikas Krishan, 1-0 (1), out of Hisar, India, stopped Steven “Iron Man” Andrade, 3-4 (2), out of Cartersville, PA , at 2:31 of the second round, of a 4. Referee was Benjy Esteves Jr.

Ring Announcer was Lupe Contreras.

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DAZN Boxing Results: Cano Stuns With First Round KO Of Linares, Andrade Dominates Akavov


By: Sean Crose

New York native Amanda Serrano made an enormous splash at the Theater at Madison Square Garden Friday night as she won her 7th – that’s 7th – world title in stunning fashion, stopping Eva Voraberger within seconds of the first round of their title bout with a tremendous body shot. By besting Austria’s 24-5 Voraburger within 35 seconds, the 36-1-1 Serrano earned herself the WBO super flyweight title. A high profile bout with the undefeated Katie Taylor may be in Serrano’s future.


Photo Credit: Matchroom Boxing Twitter Account

Chris Algieri stepped into the ring next to face former sparring partner Daniel Gonzalez. Since New York’s Algieri was essentially fighting on his home turf, it was easy to consider the match not much more than a tuneup walking in. Gonzalez held his own, however. What’s more, the 23-3 Algieri looked like, at 34, he had aged a bit. Ultimately, it didn’t matter. Algieri earned a unanimous decision win against the 17-1-1 Gonzalez. Surprisingly, some in the crowd booed at the decision.

Next up was Irish/Australian IBF junior featherweight champ, the 20-0 TJ Doheny. His opponent was the 16-3-1 Ryohei Takahashi of Japan. Takahashi took the fight on a few weeks notice, and looked outclassed by his stronger, sharper punching foe. In the third, Doheny sent his man to the mat. Takahashi got up, but Doheny continued to land powerfully and essentially dominated. Referee Michael Ortega stopped the fight in the twelfth while Takahashi was receiving punishment.

In the co-main, Jorge Linares, 45-4, fought Pablo Cesar Cano, 31-7-1, in a scheduled 12 round super lightweight affair. A Cano right hand took Linares down in the first. Linares got up – and then went down again later in the round. He went down once more, got up once more, and took more punishment. The referee wisely stopped the fight. It was a stunning upset and a brief, brilliant performance from an impressive ring veteran.

It was time for the main event. The 26-0 Demetrius Andrade stepped into the ring to defend his WBO middleweight title against the 19-2 Artur Akavov. Andrade looked like his athletic, sharp self in the first, dominating the tempo and landing effectively. The second round was a close affair, though Andrade seemed to have edged it. The third round was close, as well, with Akavov catching Andrade with a quick uppercut.

Andrade came around at the very end of the fourth, but it was proving to be a close fight, with Andrade’s skill and Akavov’s awkwardness playing well off one another. Andrade’s jab told the story in the fifth, as it was becoming clear that Akavov couldn’t land cleanly or often on his man. The sixth saw Akavov unable to get in range. By the seventh, things had become completely one sided, with Akavov simply looking outclassed and perhaps a bit wiped out. Andrade continued his pattern of hitting and not getting hit in the eighth.

Akavov actually had a few moments in the ninth where he looked to be starting to dominate. Andrade, however, was able to keep his range. Akavov did so little in the tenth, that one had to wonder if he’d actually make the final bell. The eleventh was more target practice for Andrade, who seemed to want to stop his helpless foe, but simply may not have had the power to at middleweight. However, with Andrade banging away at his man, the fight was stopped by the referee late in the twelfth. The fans and the DAZN broadcast team seemed unhappy and perplexed, but referee Arthur Mercante was clearly willing to err on the side of caution.

“You put GGG in front of me,” said Andrade after the win, “I’m gonna destroy him.”

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Manny Pacquiao vs. Adrien Broner Final Weights and Quotes


WBA WELTERWEIGHT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – 12 Rounds
Manny Pacquiao – 146 lbs.
Adrien Broner – 146 ½ lbs.
Referee: Russell Mora (Las Vegas); Judges: Tim Cheatham (Las Vegas), Dave Moretti (Las Vegas), Glenn Feldman (Connecticut)


Photo Credit: Scott Hirano /SHOWTIME

WBA INTERIM LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – 12 Rounds
Badou Jack – 175 lbs.
Marcus Browne – 175 lbs.
Referee Tony Weeks (Las Vegas); Judges: Eric Cheek (Reno), Max DeLuca (Calif.), Don Trella (Connecticut)

WBC BANTAMWEIGHT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – 12 Rounds
Rau’shee Warren – 116 ½ lbs.
Nordine Oubaali – 118 lbs.
Referee: Vic Drakulich (Reno); Judges: Ricardo Ocasio (Las Vegas), Julie Lederman (New York), Steven Weisfeld (New Jersey)

FEATHERWEIGHT BOUT – 10 Rounds
Hugo Ruiz – 125 lbs.
Alberto Guevara – 126 lbs.
Referee: Jay Nady (Las Vegas); Judges: Adalaide Byrd (Las Vegas), Robert Hoyle (Las Vegas), Glenn Trowbridge (Las Vegas)
Note: Alberto Guevara replaces Jhack Tepora, who failed to make weight

FLASH QUOTES
Manny Pacquiao
“Age is just a number. It doesn’t matter that I’m 40 years old. I still feel young. Tomorrow I have something to prove – that at the age of 40, I can still give my best. It’s my legacy to give a good fight and to accomplish all this and especially at the age of 40. I have to prove something that Manny Pacquiao is still there.”

“Having Freddie [Roach] back has helped a lot. I’m happy that the team is united. We’re so happy and satisfied with the results of this training camp.

Adrien Broner
“This is a hell of an opportunity. I’m not just doing this for me, I’m doing this for the hood. After I win tomorrow night, I’ll be a legend overnight. I just have to do me. You’ll see tomorrow night.”

Marcus Browne
“He’s acting like he’s tough, but he isn’t. It’s business. He knows what time it is.”

Badou Jack
“He’s a good fighter. I respect everybody that steps in the boxing ring, but I’m going to show him what level I’m on. He’s never been on this level. He’ll see tomorrow.”

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Daniel Jacobs: “I Have An Opportunity To Make History!”


By: Sean Crose

“It is such an honor and privilege to be a part of DAZN and Matchroom Boxing,” IBF middleweight titlist Daniel Jacobs recently said, “thank you guys for believing in me.” Jacobs, who is set to face Canelo Alvarez in a May 4th, Cinco de Mayo weekend superbout, was clearly happy with how is career is now panning out. “Displaying my skills on such a platform,” he said, “would do wonders for my career I have an opportunity to make history! Plus I have the best team to ensure the best possible opportunities for my career.” Jacobs, who threw in his lot with Matchroom honcho Eddie Hearn not that long ago, is being rewarded by getting a chance to take down Canelo, the biggest name in all of boxing.

“This is the moment that I’ve been waiting for my whole entire career,” Jacobs said. “I’ve been through so much in life just to get to this point, I look forward to taking advantage of such an amazing opportunity. Canelo is a great champion and a worthy opponent to ensure an epic fight the fans will remember for ages!! In order to be the best, you have to beat the best – this with this fight represents to me.”

Hearn himself had high praise for his fighter. “Danny is where it all started for us in America,” he said, “and I want to thank him for believing in us…it has been a pleasure working with him and his manager Keith Connolly who has fought every inch to get Danny the best opportunities and position within the sport.” Hearn also had favorable words for DAZN, who Matchroom has a deal with. ““For DAZN,” said Hearn, “this is another major signing as we continue to build an emphatic team of fighters – Jacobs vs. Canelo is a wonderful addition for subscribers and fans, it truly is one of the great fights in boxing today.”

Connolly also weighed in on the matter, expressing his happiness with how things have been working out for Team Jacobs. “We are super excited to have re-signed with Matchroom Boxing,” Jacob’s manager claimed. “Eddie has done a fabulous job guiding Danny to a World title and now a mega fight. He has delivered on everything he said he would when we first met him…we are grateful that DAZN has such belief in Daniel Jacobs as they look to push him into superstardom over the next chapter of his career.”

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Kovalev Arrested For Hitting Woman, Claims Innocence


By: Sean Crose

“Former light heavyweight champion Sergey Kovalev has been charged with felony assault for allegedly punching a woman in the face back in June — but he claims he’s not guilty.” These words, which come to us via TMZ, have taken the fight world by storm. Kovaelv, the former light heavyweight titlist, is due to rematch Eleider Álvarez, who bested the Russian fighter by knockout last summer, on February 2nd in Frisco, Texas. As TMZ points out, “What’s interesting … Kovalev fought Eleider Álvarez in August — just 2 months after the arrest — and lost in a shocking upset.”

According to the report, cops busted Kovalev on June 9th of last year in Big Bear, California. A woman had told police that Kovalev had struck her in the face, “causing serious injuries.” According to the story, Kovalev hit on the accuser during a party. After she refused his advances, he followed her to her cabin, where the assault ended up taking place. “We’re told,” TMZ states, “the woman claims she suffered major injuries including a severely broken nose, a concussion and a displaced disk in her neck.” Kovalev pleaded not guilty and is scheduled in court again on March.

If convicted, the fighter could face jail time.

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DAZN Boxing Preview: Andrade vs. Akavov


By: Michael Kane

It’s Friday night fight night this week as WBO middleweight champion Demetrious ‘Boo Boo’ Andrade makes the first defence of his title when he takes on Artur Akavov (19-2, 8 KOs).

Andrade won the belt by beating Walter Kautondokwa for the vacant title after champion Billy Joe Saunders vacated due to facing a ban for an adverse drug test.

The 30 year old Andrade (26-0, 16 KOs) will be looking to put on a show at the Madison Square Garden Theater on a card that features several title bouts.

The 33 year old Russian, Akavov, beat Gonzalo Gaston Coria by unanimous decision in May 2018. He is a former WBO European champion and has faced former champ Billy Joe Saunders, falling to an unanimous decision defeat in 2016.

Andrade will be looking to put on a good performance to open up the chance of unifying the division against the likes of Canelo Alvarez, Rob Brant and Daniel Jacobs.

Irishman TJ Doheny (20-0, 14 KOs) defends his IBF super bantamweight title when he takes on Japan’s Ryohei Takahashi (16-3-1, 6 KOs).

This will be Doheny’s first defence having won the belt in August last year by unanimous decision against Takahashi’s compatriot, Ryosuke Iwasa.

Takahashi is on a 5 fight win streak which includes winning the IBF Pan Pacific super bantamweight title.

The third world title fight on the card will see Amanda Serrano (35-1-1, 26 KOs) bid to become world champion in a 7th weight class. Serrano will face Era Voraberger (24-5, 11 KOs) for the vacant WBO super flyweight title. The Austrian, Voraberger has also won a couple of titles at different weight classes.

Also on the card, and likely to be chief support to the main event is the ever popular Jorge Linares (45-4, 28 KOs) who is on the trail of another world title shot. Linares takes on Mexican Pablo Cesar Cano (31-7, 21 KOs). Both men will be fighting for Cano’s WBC International Silver title.

Another former world champion Chris Algieri (22-3, 8 KOs) faces Daniel Gonzalez (17-1, 7 KOs) on the card.

The event will be shown live on DAZN in the U.S and on Sky Sports in the UK.

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WBC Orders Wilder-Fury Rematch


By: Sean Crose

As expected, the World Boxing Council is ordering a rematch between it’s heavyweight champion, Deontay Wilder, and Tyson Fury, the man he fought to a draw last December in what is already being considered a classic bout. Per the WBC:

“Consistent with the WBC Board of governors voting regarding the direct rematch between WBC champion Deontay Wilder and Tyson Fury, the WBC is hereby notifying both camps that the free negotiation period is opened and if there is no agreement between the parties a purse bid will be conducted by the WBC on Tuesday February 5th .

The WBC has modified the 70-30 split and has confirmed a 60-40 split in favor of the champion Wilder considering the market value of Fury.”

The announcement, which arrived on Thursday, came as little surprise to the fight world. In fact, talks between the two camps are already reported to have begun. The first battle between the two undefeated giants was truly a contest of skill and will, as the slippery Fury was able to avoid the hard hitting Wilder for large portions of the fight – until being dropped twice. The second knockdown, which occurred in the last round, say Fury flat on his back, seemingly done. Somehow, however, the enormous Englishman was able to get back on his feet and finish the round strongly.

The fight, of course, ended up being a draw, with many – though certainly not all – feeling that Fury had done enough to win. The controversy, coupled with the wild knockdown and recovery of Fury after over half an hour of the two fighters essentially playing cat and mouse, almost begged for a rematch. To make things even more enticing, the two larger than life heavyweights, who stand between six and a half and seven feet tall, have personalities to match their statures.

Lost in all of this is heavyweight multi-titlist Anthony Joshua, who, like Fury, is an undefeated Englishman. A staggeringly huge draw in his native country, Joshua has yet to fight in America, where the second Wilder-Fury fight, if it comes to fruition, may likely take place. Although Joshua holds most of the major titles in the division, Wilder’s WBC belt is arguably the most well regarded and well known. On top of that, Fury has a claim to the lineal championship due to the fact that he bested long reigning heavyweight king Wladimir Klitshcko in 2015, making Fury “the man who beat the man.” In other words, there’s no undisputed ruler of the heavyweights at the moment, which makes the once bland weight category more intriguing and interesting than it has been in perhaps a generation.

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