Tag Archives: steve

Steve “Double SS” Smoger Passes the 1,000 bout Mark


By: Ken Hissner

Whenever you think of someone that presents himself in the ring and can “outshine” the boxers in the corners you can picture “Steve Smoger”. How many times have a witnessed at boxing events people from the audience go up to him and introduce themselves in order to say “I met Steve Smoger” at the fights? He finally passed the 1,000 bout mark recently and at age 68 you would never guess his age for the way he still moves around in the ring.

It all began in 1978 when Smoger got a call from the former world heavyweight champion “Jersey” Joe Walcott who was then the New Jersey Boxing Commissioner in need of an inspector for a show that night. In September of 1982 Smoger was granted a referee license.

There are few if any can come close to match how many countries Smoger has served as a referee. At last count it was around the “30” mark give or take! He email’s me at times letting me know what country his next assignment will be in.

Smoger was finally inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2015. In 2018 he is the only active IBHOF inductee still active. If he wasn’t serving as a referee he would be an ideal guest speaker on boxing and even the law being a former Municipal Court Judge in his hometown of Atlantic City, New Jersey. He also was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Air Force Reserves serving 30 years before retiring in 2005.

Besides being a referee he has also served as a boxing judge in over 30 events which is quite unusual for an active referee. There was a time in New Jersey as it was in the United Kingdom that a referee was the lone judge in a bout. He did serve as a judge from 1996-2015 with the last time in of all places Russia.

Even though known as a “no-nonsense” I have witnessed him giving a boxer every chance to continue if he thinks the boxer is capable. The fight that comes to mind is when heavyweight Amir “Hardcore” Mansour had two-time world cruiserweight champion Steve “USS” Cunningham on the deck and it looked like he was about to stop the fight. It was April 4th of 2014 and Cunningham had been knocked down twice in the fifth round at the Liacouras Center of Temple University. By the tenth and final round it was Mansour on the canvas with Cunningham taking the decision in a USBA heavyweight title bout.

Besides being a referee in over 1,000 bouts Smoger has officiated in over 200 world title bouts. In August of 2017 he was appointed as the IBA Boxing Officials Committee co-chair.

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These Three Hold the Future of Philadelphia Boxing in Their Hands


By: Ken Hissner

At the end of this article this writer will talk about the three boxers in Philadelphia who hold the future of Philly boxing in their hands!

For some time Philadelphia writers, trainers, boxers and promoters have said Philadelphia is the “boxing capitol of the world!” Currently Philadelphia does not have a world champion. Only seven of Philadelphia’s boxers are in the WBA, WBC, WBO and IBF ratings.

The most recent world champion was Danny “Swift” Garcia, 33-1 (19), who is currently now ranked No. 2 by both the WBC and WBA. He lost his WBC welterweight title by split decision to WBA champion Keith Thurman in March and hasn’t fought since. His manager is Al Haymon and his promoter is Golden Boy Promotions. He is trained by his father Angel Garcia at their DSG gym in North Philadelphia.

Steve “USS” Cunningham, 29-9-1 (13), the former two-time cruiserweight champion is listed at No. 15 by the IBF. He recently lost a lack luster decision. No one keeps in better condition than “USS” does. Newark, NJ, is having a cruiserweight title match and the opponent is a former opponent of his. “USS” should be on that show! He is trained by Naziim Richardson and promoted by Main Events.

Jesse “Hard Work” Hart got his opportunity recently coming off the canvas early in the fight but made a strong second half finish in losing but will probably keep his No. 1 WBO status among super middleweights but isn’t ranked anywhere else. How can that be? If he comes down to earth after that loss he still has potential to be a world champion but you can’t split his time between two gyms with two different trainers and expect results! It’s Fred Jenkins, Sr. at the ABC Recreation Center in North Philly and it’s his father Eugene “Cyclone” Hart in Joe Hand’s South Philly gym.

Super welterweight Julian “J Rock” Williams, 23-1-1 (15), lost in a WBC title attempt in December of 2016 to Jermell Charlo but is still ranked No. 6 in the WBC, No. 9 in the IBF and No. 15 in the WBO. He is still young and still has a future. Stephan “Bread Man” Edwards is his manager and trainer at Shuler’s Gym in West Philly.

Welterweight southpaw “The New” Ray Robinson, 24-2 (12) due to inactivity has dropped in the ratings but is still No. 10 in the WBO, No. 11 in the IBF and No. 13 in the WBC. He can make anyone look bad. So why doesn’t the Garcia people consider a Philly bout with him? He is trained by “Bozy” Ennis at “Bozy’s Dungeon” in North Philly. He is managed by David McWater.

“Hammerin” Hank Lundy, 28-6-1 (14), is No. 10 in the WBC lightweight rankings and has fallen to the “Philly Jinx” on more than one occasion. He’s 3-3 in his last 6 fights. “Cornbread” Ramsey was back in the corner last fight. He trains out of the Marion Anderson Gym in South Philly. Tevin “American Idol” Farmer, 25-4-1 (5), is No. 2 in the WBC, No. 5 in the IBF and No. 9 in the WBO. Coming off an injury he should be ready to go again soon. Marc Cipparone is his manager while “Chino” Rivas trains him in Cherry Hill, NJ.

Now let’s get to the “future” of Philadelphia. The best prospect since 1984 Gold Medal Olympia is welterweight Jaron “Boots” Ennis, 15-0 (13), who at age 20 is on the verge of stepping up the competition. Promoting his fights with Victory Promotions is Chris Middendorf who has him either in Philly October 21st or in DC October 14th. To have him in fifteen fights in eighteen months is impressive. He was an Olympic Alternate in 2016. His father “Bozy” trains him at “Bozy’s Dungeon” North Philly Gym over the Harrowgate Gym.

Bantamweight Christian Carto, 12-0 (11), finally got some rounds in this past week in the main event defeating a 14-1 Mexican opponent. He has had twelve fights in fifteen months of boxing and is a former National Golden Gloves Champion. He lost his manager recently to a death and still doesn’t have a promoter. His trainer is Mickey Rosati, Jr. whose gym Carto trains at over Rosati’s Auto Repair garage. He’s had ten fights with Hard Hitting Promotions and two with King’s Promotions. He’s one white boxer that even the most negative black boxing people love him in Philly.

The third is a 17 year-old super lightweight named Brandon Pizarro, 8-0 (4), who will be turning 18 this month. “Gifted” is a crowd pleaser trained by “Bozy” Ennis and his father Angel Pizarro, Sr. at “Bozy’s Dungeon” in North Philly. He is promoted by Hard Hitting Promotions.

On Sunday October 18th John DiSanto is holding his 8th Annual “Briscoe Awards” where most of these boxers along with this writer will be in attendance. It will be held at the Xfinity Live facility at 1100 Pattison Avenue in South Philly.

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Mayweather vs. McGregor PPV Undercard Results: Davis and Badou Jack Win by Stoppage, Tabiti Decisions Cunningham


By: William Holmes

The T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada was the host site for tonight’s Showtime PPV attraction between all-time great Floyd Mayweather Jr. and UFC super star Conor McGregor.

Fight fans were treated to three bouts on the televised portion of the pay per view card, including two world title fights.


Photo Credit: USA Today

The first fight of the night was between Andrew Tabiti (14-0) and Steve Cunningham (29-8-1) in the cruiserweight division.

Cunningham is a former world champion in the cruiserweight division and Tabiti is prized prospect in the Mayweather Promotions stable.

Cunningham had the height advantage and looked to be in great shape. Tabiti was able to stay out of range in the first two rounds, but Cunningham was the more aggressive fighter and forced Tabiti to tie up often. Tabiti’s jab was landing in the second round and he landed a hard right uppercut at the end of a combination.

Cunningham’s punches were missing with increasing regularity from the first round to the fourth round and Tabiti remained an elusive target. Tabiti’s hands were faster and more accurate but Cunningham’s chin was able to take his best punches.

The fifth round featured two blistering combinations by Tabiti in the center of the ring. Tabiti was able to land his jab to the body and head of Cunningham in the sixth round. Cunningham’s frustration with his inability to mount an offensive attack continued into the seventh round.

Cunningham, to his credit, still came forward in the eighth round despite clearly being behind on the cards. He was able to force a few exchanges but Tabiti got the better of them.

Cunningham needed a knockout in the final two rounds to win the fight, but that knockout never came.

Andrew Tabiti remained undefeated with a decision victory with scores of 97-93, 97-93, and 100-90.

Nathan Cleverly (30-3) faced Badou Jack (21-1-2) for the WBA Light Heavyweight Title.

Jack established himself as the more accurate puncher in the first round and was able to do land some good body shots in the opening round. Cleverly looked like the bigger fight and was able to land some hard straight right hands at the end of the round.

Jack continued his body attack in the second round and he was able to land hard right uppercuts in the third round. Jack’s assault was more vicious in the fourth round and he had Cleverly’s nose busted from numerous uppercuts and left hooks.

Jack came out aggressively in the fifth round and obliterated Cleverly from corner to corner. Cleverly was taking several hard combinations without answering back. The referee let Jack batter Cleverly perhaps longer than he should have, but he finally stopped it near the end of the round.

Badou Jack wins the WBA Light Heavyweight by TKO at 2:47 of the fifth round.

Afterwards, Badou Jack called out Adonis Stevenson.

The final undercard bout was between Gervonta Davis (18-0) and Francisco Fonseca (19-0-1). This bout was supposed to be for the IBF Super Featherweight Title but Davis failed to make the contracted weight.

Fonseca looked awkward in the first round and Davis was able to land hooks and uppercuts to the body. Fonseca ate some heavy combinations in the second round but was able to take some of Davis’ best shots and reply with punches of his own.

Fonseca kept a high guard in the second round but had to absorb blows to the body. Davis began to showboat in the fourth round and landed a few left hooks after putting his hands behind his back, but Fonseca connected with enough punches to maybe steal the round.

Fonseca pressed the action in the fifth round and landed some good combinations to the head and body. Davis was telegraphing his punches and may have lost this round solely based on Fonseca’s activity.

Davis stopped showing off in the sixth round and stuck to a traditional boxing stance and was able to land sharp jabs and hard straight left hands. Davis finally stunned Fonseca in the seventh round with hard hooks but Fonseca stayed on his feet.

Davis opened up the eighth round with a stunning straight left hand and had Fonseca stuck in the corner. He connected with a left hook that may have landed on the back of Fonseca’s head, but Fonseca went to the mat holding the back of his head and was unable to get up.

Gervonta Davis wins by knockout at 0:39 of the eighth round.

More Full Coverage: Floyd Mayweather vs Conor McGregor

John Scully To Host Fundraiser For Gerald McClellan August 5th


By: Sean Crose

If you were a boxing fan in or around Springfield, Massachusetts in the late 80s-early 90s, you knew exactly who John Scully was. Hailing from right down the road, across the Connecticut border, Scully was known to train in Springfield and was the shining star of the area scene. Scully wasn’t just a local fighter, he was a local fighter with a bright future. Back then, such things meant something – just as they do now. Sure enough, Scully went on to quite the successful career at light heavyweight. Nowadays, Scully, also known as “Iceman,” is a trainer of high note, yet he’s also known for something that’s perhaps even more important…helping out former fighters in need.

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On August 5th, Scully will be hosting a benefit for Gerald McClellan, an amazing middleweight champion from the 90s who suffered permanent brain damage after a brutal fight with Britain’s Nigel Benn in 1995. “Gerald and I were amateurs together back in the 80s,” says Scully. “I’ve been in touch with his sister(s) and they take care of him at home all on their own.” Sure enough, McClellan’s siblings have taken responsibility for their bother’s well being. Needless to say, such an endeavor can be quite costly.

Hall of Fame Broadcaster Steve Farhood puts it succinctly: there’s no financial safety nets in boxing. “In team sports,” Farhood points out, “there are pensions.” Unfortunately, there are no pensions for fighters. Farhood rightly argues that short term memories can make things all the more unacceptable. “There’s an initial outcry,” he states, referring to times when fighters get severely hurt – or even killed. Yet “the person’s problems and issues don’t fade.” Farhood also adds that “there are financial concerns, as well.”

Cue Scully and the fundraiser he’s hosting for McClellan on August 5th at Moniques Lounge 108 in New York City. The event is free to the public and will feature “raffles and signatures of gloves.” To Scully, the whole thing has come about organically. “Basically I’ve always done these amateur boxing reunions,” he says. “I have former amateur boxers get together and hang out.” To Scully, using these events to help out former peers like McClellan only made sense. “It’s come to that – where I can raise money and help these guys out,” he says. “I decided to do a fundraiser for him (McClellan) in conjunction with a reunion.”

Stories like McClellan’s have been of great personal interest to Farhood, who is quick to praise Scully for his charitable work. “John is great,” says the popular Showtime analyst. For Farhood, who; as an expert, has witnessed more than his fair share of ring related tragedies, the case of McClellan has been something of a personal crusade over the years. “I didn’t know him well,” he says of the former champ, admitting that he was inspired by famed fight photographer Teddy Blackburn to help McClellan and his family out. “Blackburn,” says Farhood, “championed the cause early.”

Boxing is the greatest sport on earth, not only for the brilliance that can be seen regularly in the ring, but oftentimes for what transpires outside of it. Thanks to men like Scully, fans will be able to take part in some of the brilliance that takes place outside of it this summer. The Fundraiser on the fifth of August won’t only be fun, it will be for an absolutely terrific cause.

Here’s the info:

Fundraiser for Gerald McClellan

Hosted by John “Iceman” Scully
August 5th, 2017
Monique’s Lounge 108
181 East 108th St.
Spanish Harlem, NYC
Doors open at 1 PM
Free Admission

Private donations may be sent to:
Gerald McClellan Trust

839 E. Wyandotte
Freeport, Illinois
61032

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Nigel Benn, What Are You Doing?


Nigel Benn, What Are You Doing?
By: Greg Houghton

Former two-weight world champion Nigel Benn has recently stated that a contract has been drawn which secures a fight between himself (aged 53) and Steve Collins (aged 52) to take place this year.

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Photo Credit: Nigel Benn Twitter Page

Now at the age of 53 Benn has transformed from the animal he used to be, into one of the most gentlemenly and respectful figures associated with the sport. Benn is a British boxing legend and appears to have a wonderful and loving relationship with his son, upcoming prospect Connor Benn. Heart warming scenes have shown the two after Connor Benn’s previous fights kissing and hugging in celebration. Nigel Benn appears to have gotten the balance just right in supporting his son whilst staying away from the limelight of Connor’s career, all the while giving him the room he needs to grow as an athlete and having the complete respect of his son. On camera, Nigel Benn is also an absolute joy to watch in interviews as someone whose wise words and tips for the younger generation of the sport sparkle with joy and pride at the man that his son is becomming.

It has been pressed for a while now that he and old foe Chris Eubank (AKA English) have been planning to fight for a third time. They are both now over the age of 50. Apparent complications in closing the deal (which are very believable based on Jr’s career so far) have meant that Benn has apparently withdrawn from the idea, and instead offered the fight to someone who has beaten them both, Steve Collins.

“For me it’s all about closure, it ain’t about the money. I just want to have a fight, and Steve obliged”

Collins stopped Benn twice when they fought, at a point where Benn was rumoured to be going through serious issues in his home life which hindered his performance. These performances, particularly his last one against Collins, are perhaps the catilyst for Benn wanting to take this fight. In a recent interview with IFL TV, Benn stated “For me it’s all about closure, it ain’t about the money. I just want to have a fight, and Steve obliged”. It’s not surprising Collins, aka The Celtic Warrior, took this fight as he not only beat Eubank and Benn twice, he long after retiring continued to try to book a fight with Roy Jones Jr.

This was one of the greatest eras in British boxing with the top three (Colins, Eubank, Benn) all dying to fight each other and doing so multiple times. The hostility and rivalry between these three, along with top contenders Henry Wharton and Michael Watson, was electric for boxing fans.This period in a way draws parallels to the essence of Ali, Frazier and Foreman in the early 70’s. Some would say that this era in which the three Brits starred is a world away from the state of boxing today, with fighters seemingly being able to vacate belts and back out of fights at will. However, this era happened more than twenty years ago, and these once great fighters, have aged.

History tells us, for the most part, that ageing fighters who were once legendary bring sad moments to the ring, which are difficult for boxing fans to swallow. Watching Bernard Hopkins get dismanteld by Joe Smith Jr, Muhammed Ali get punished by Larry Holmes, these are not fights which any boxing fan really wanted to see. Most recently, watching EnzoMaccarinelli knock Roy Jones Jr out in the fourth round of their fight in December 2015 was like watching your favorite pub burn to the ground in front of you.

If the fight between Benn and Collins were to get licensed, it is not a fight that many boxing fans would want to see at the age these two are at now. Several leaked videos of Nigel Benn in training at the age of 53 show him being lightning fast and looking exceptional for his age. In fact, Benn claims to be capable of “doing things now that he’s never done before”, due to his healthy and stress-free lifestyle of recent times.

Nigel Benn has grown old very gracefully and is a witty, charming and entertaining presence in his interviews. We beg, please Nigel let this fight go for you have nothing to prove. You are one of Britain’s boxing heroes and your work will always be remembered. Stay in shape, stay humble and continue your wonderful work in guiding your talented son to stardom. Let boxing fans continue to marvel in the magnificence that was the era of Middleweight and Super-Middleweight boxing of the 90’s. As Eddie Hutch famously said to Joe Frazier at the Thrilla in Manilla;
“No one will ever forget what you did here”.

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HBO World Championship Boxing Results: Beltran Flattens Maicelo, Crawford Dazzles in Impressive Performance


HBO World Championship Boxing Results: Beltran Flattens Maicelo,
By: William Holmes

The ultra-talented and underappreciated Terence Crawford headlined tonight’s HBO World Championship Boxing Card live from Madison Square Garden in New York City as he took on former Olympic Gold Medalist Felix Diaz.

The untelevised undercard featured some of Top Rank’s best prospects, including gold medalist Fazliddin Gaibnazarov and the man many consider to be the best prospect from the US Olympic Boxing team of 2016, Shakur Stevenson.

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There were no notable upsets on the undercard.

Unfortunately for Top Rank, Terence Crawford’s ability to draw in New York City appears to be questionable, as the top section of Madison Square Garden was empty and there were numerous empty seats in the lower section of the arena.

The first bout on the televised card was between Jonathan Maicelo (25-2) and Ray Beltran (32-7-1) for the NABF, NABO, WBA International, and in an IBF World Title Elimination Bout in the lightweight division.

Maicelo, surprisingly, had a large number of fans in attendance and they were very vocal during the ring entrance and announcements.

Both boxers fought out of an orthodox stance and Beltran was clearly the bigger fighter. Beltran pressed forward in the opening round while the crowd loudly chanted “Peru, Peru!” for their boxer Jonathan Maicelo. Maicelo was able to score a surprise knockdown on Beltran from a combination to the body and an accidental head-butt in the first. The clash of heads opened up a cut over the left eye of Maicelo and the left eye of Beltran. Beltran was able to hurt Maicelo with a left hook at the end of the round.

Beltran pressed forward to start the second round and opened up with an early left hook. Maicelo was able to respond with a solid four punch combination followed by a hard shot to the body. Maicelo looked energized and landed another combination on Beltran by the ropes. However, beltran later responded with a vicious left hook that sent the back of Maicelo’s head crashing hard on the mat.

Maicelo was out cold and the referee immediately stopped the bout. Ray Beltran wins by a vicious knockout at 1:25 of the second round.

The main event of the night was between Olympic Gold Medalist Felix Diaz (19-1) and Terence Crawford (30-0) for the WBO and WBC Super Lightweight World Titles.

Crawford, who had a noticeable height advantage, was active with his jab early on and chose to come out in a southpaw stance against the Diaz, who is a natural southpaw. Diaz was short with most of his punches and reached for his left hook while Crawford was active with his jab.

Diaz was able to land a good left hook early in the second round and later fell to the mat with a pushdown afterwards. Crawford was sharp with his jab for most of the second round and landed a sharp double uppercut combination in the middle of the round. Diaz was able to land a hard right hook near the end of the second that caught Crawford off guard.

Crawford hard a commanding third round and opened it up with a crisp counter left uppercut on a charging Diaz. Crawford’s accuracy with his jab continued in the third round and he was able to land several hard two punch combinations on Diaz.

Diaz was warned for a low blow in the fourth round, but more concerning for him was that Crawford’s accuracy showed no signs of letting up while Diaz’s face was beginning to show signs of swelling from Crawfrod’s accurate assaults.

Crawford dominated the fifth round which was punctuated by a left cross right jab combination and a hard left uppercut.

Crawford toyed with Diaz in the sixth round and seemingly touched Diaz with his gloves whenever he wanted to. Diaz was able to land some good punches in the seventh round and they had several good exchanges, but Crawford appeared to get the better of Diaz.

There was some trash talk between both boxers in the eighth and ninth rounds, but Crawford was landing combinations at will and the intensity of his punches showed no signs of slowing down. He had Diaz momentarily stunned in the ninth round with a hard left cross to the temple of Diaz.

Ringside doctors took a hard look at the eyes of Diaz before the start of the tenth round but decided to let him continue. Crawford took no pity on the plight of Diaz and battered him from ring post to ring post in the tenth round and toyed with him, again.

Diaz walked back to his corner at the end of the tenth round looking like a defeated man and his corner wisely decided to call of the fight.
Terence Crawford wins by TKO at the end of the tenth round in an impressive and dominant performance.

Undercard Quick Results:

Steve Nelson (7-0) defeated Gilberto Rubio (7-5) by TKO at 0:36 of the second round in the light heavyweight division.

Henry Lebron (2-0) defeated Johnny Estrada (0-2) by TKO at 0:52 of the second round in the super featherweight division.

Fazliddin Gaibnazarov (2-0) defeated Agustine Mauras (6-3-3) by decision with scores of 80-72 on all three scorecards in the super lightweight division.

Konstantin Ponomarev (32-0) defeated Edward Paredes (37-7-1) by decision with scores of 78-74 on all three scorecards in the super welterweight division.

Teofimo Lopez III (5-0) defeated Ronald Rivas (5-6-2) by knockout at 2:21 of the second round in the lightweight division.

Tong Hui Li (9-1) defeated Daniel Calzada (14-17-3) by decision in the super welterweight division with scores of 60-54 on all three scorecards.

Shakur Stevenson (2-0) defeated Carlos Suarez (6-4-2) in the featherweight division wins by TKO at 2:35 of the first round.

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Kauffman & Mansour in Showdown at Reading Friday!


Kauffman & Mansour in Showdown at Reading Friday!
By: Ken Hissner

There was a time when they were sparring one another. Then came the Facebook trash talking back and forth. Now the rubber has hit the road on March 17th at the Santander Arena in Reading, PA. Travis “My Time” Kauffman, 31-1 (23), of Reading, PA, takes on southpaw Amir “Hardcore” Mansour, 22-2-1 (16), of Wilmington, DE, over 12 rounds for the WBC US (USNBC) and PA State heavyweight titles.

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This writer is not a fan of two boxers I like fighting one another but I have to say it will be an interesting match-up on Premier Boxing Champions: The Next Round on Bounce TV starting at 9pm. Doors open at 6pm and first bout 6:30pm. It is a ten bout card! It’s quite unusual to have 20 boxers on a card with only one with a losing record. Kings Promotions and Corona are promoters.

Wednesday in Reading a press conference was held at the Doubletree Hotel with David Feldman at the microphone. He started with the co-feature with former IBF welterweight champion Kermit “El Asesino” Cintron and David “Day Day” Grayton. Cintron’s trainer Joe Pastore said “Kermit has re-discovered the style he once had. His right hand after surgery is now fine”. “I am well prepared and come Friday it will be my night,” said Cintron. Grayton had little to say.

Mansour is the former USBA and PA State champion. Kauffman is the No. 1 rated USBA contender. “Everything is great. I was in Houston since December 20th and came home March 5th. I have been motivated knowing that I have a killer in front of me. Amir wants what I want and that’s a shot at the heavyweight title.I knew if I beat Arreola it would open eyes, but if I beat Mansour it will open doors,” said Kauffman.

Trainer of Kauffman Naziim Richardson said “I think it will be worth for both. One word for Mansour and that is “dangerous” guy. He can blow your brains out with a good shot. You can’t lose your focus for a second.”
In pertaining to his age Mansour said “I’m selling youth juice at 1k a bottle if anyone is interested. I like to see sparks fly and this is a great opportunity for both of us.”

In the co-feature former IBF welterweight champion Kermit “El Asesino” Cintron, 39-5-2 (30) will be seeking win number 40. He is 6-0-1 in his last seven fights. He is taking on David “Day Day” Grayton, 15-1 (11), of Wash., D.C., in a scheduled 10 round super welterweight bout. Grayton was the 2010 National Golden Gloves champion defeating Errol Spence who is now the No. 1 IBF contender and former 2016 Olympian. This will be Cintron’s biggest test since coming back in 2013.

The undercard features the former 2-time IBF cruiserweight champion Steve “USS” Cunningham, 28-8-1 (13), of Philadelphia, back after an almost a year lay-off taking on Felipe “El Indio” Romero, 19-11-1 (13), in a scheduled 8. He is from Baja, MEX. He twice defeated Julio Cesar Gonzalez who stopped Poland’s DariuszMichalczewski win streak when he was 48-0 and in Germany winning the WBO light heavyweight title. Romero was the Mexican cruiserweight champion at the time. In his next fight he won the Mexican heavyweight title. Then he defeated Gonzalez in a rematch.
A pair of unbeaten Brooklyn boxers will be on the undercard in Chordale Booker, 5-0 (3), and Chris Colbert, 5-0 (2), in separate bouts. Local Reading product southpaw super welterweight Erik Spring, 8-1-2 (1), will be meeting Jeremiah Wiggins, 10-5-1 (5), out of Newport News, VA. Another local middleweight Nicholas Hernandez, 5-2 (1), meets Nick Valliere, 5-1 (2), of Forked River, NJ. And another Reading boxer super lightweight Kashon Hutchinson, 2-1 (1), takes on Darius “I Am King” Ervin, 3-1 (0), of L.A. While another in Jesus Perez makes his debut.

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PBC on Spike TV Results: Peralta With Upset Decision Over Guerrero, Gausha and Hernandez Vicotorious


PBC on Spike TV Results
By: William Holmes

The Honda Center in Anaheim, California was the host site for last night’s Bellator MMA card and was the host site for tonight’s Premier Boxing Champions (PBC) card on Spike TV.

Three bouts were scheduled to be televised on tonight’s card and featured a welterweight main event between Robert Guerrero and David Peralta.

Andy Samuelson / Premier Boxing Champions
Photo Credit: Andy Samuelson/Premier Boxing Champions

The opening bout of the night was between US Olympian Terrell Gausha (18-0) and Steve Martinez (16-2) in the junior middleweight division.

On paper, this looked to be the most competitive fight of the night.

Martinez looked like the bigger boxer and both fighters fought out of an orthodox stance. Martinez’s jab was accurate in the first round and he mixed up his shots to the head and body, but Gausha was able to end the round with a stiff counter right.

Martinez out threw Gausha in the second round, but Gausha was connecting with the cleaner counters. There were several good exchanges in the third and fourth rounds, but it looked like Gausha was making Martinez miss more while landing at a higher percentage.

Martinez’s pressure was constant in the middle rounds and could have won him some rounds in the eye of the judges. Gausha was more active in the seventh round than in the previous rounds, and both boxers were willing to stand in the pocket and exchange blows.

Gausha’s jab and lead uppercut were effective in slowing down Martinez in the eighth round, and the ninth round opened up with a flurry with both boxers taking and landing hard shots.

By the final round the fight could have been scored for either fighter and both boxers tried to leave it all in the ring and let their hands go, but neither man was able to score that definitive knockdown to lay claim to a convincing victory.

The judges scored the bout 95-95, 97-93, and 97-93 for Terrell Gausha.

The next bout of the night was between Alfredo Angulo (24-5) and Freddy Hernandez (33-8) in the Super Middleweight division.

Both boxers have spent most of their career fighting in the junior middleweight division, and a loss for either would likely signal the end of any future title shots, and they fought like it in the opening round. Neither Hernandez nor Angulo spent any time feeling the other out and freely exchanged power shots. Hernandez was landing with more frequency and the cleaner shots in the opening round.

Hernandez started off as the more accurate boxer in the second round, but Angulo took some of the best punches that Hernandez threw and was beginning to get within range and land hard punches of his own.

Hernandez had a very strong third round and was able to pop shot Angulo at will
with multi punch combinations. Hernandez’s dominance continued into the fourth round and Angulo was visibly frustrated at the end of the round.

Angulo had a little more success in the fifth round and was able to stun Hernandez with a low blow and a wild left and right hook to the head of Hernandez. Angulo was able to open up a cut over the left eye of Hernandez, who was starting to breathe heavily from his open mouth.

Hernandez’s corner did a good job at closing up his cut before the start of the sixth round and Hernandez was able to go back to pop shotting Angulo from the outside. Hernandez’s cut was re-opened in the final minute of the sixth round from a good right hand by Angulo.

Hernandez had a difficult time keeping Angulo at a good range in the seventh round and his eye was bleeding profusely, but he still out landed and out threw Angulo.

The action was intense and the volume of punches thrown in the final three rounds was high, but it appeared to be Angulo who was landing the harder punches while it was Hernandez who landed the higher number of punches.

The judges scored the bout 98-92, 97-93, and 97-93 for Freddy Hernandez.

The main event of the night was between Robert Guerrero (33-4-1) and David Peralta (25-2-1) in the welterweight division.

Guerreo was a former two division world champion and has been in the ring with the likes of Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Danny Garcia. David Peralta has spent his entire career fighting in Argentina and has never fought in the United States.

Guerreo, a southpaw, started off by pressing forward more and showing head good head movement. He looked like he was giving up several inches in height to Peralta. Guerreo was able to get past the jab of Peralta in the opening round and land several hard left hands to the chin.

Guerreo spent most of the second round patiently looking for a clean counter to land while Peralta seemed content on throwing his range finding jab but not much else.

Peralta was able to catch Guerreo by surprise with two quick counter right hands but Guerreo was accurate with his counter punching afterwards in the third round. Guerreo did open up a cut near the hairline of Peralta in the third.
Guerreo was able to snap the head of Peralta backwards several times in the fourth round with hard straight left hands. However, Peralta was able to answer with a strong fifth round and even stunned Guerreo with a combination that ended with a straight left jab. Peralta continued the positive momentum into the sixth round and his style was appearing to baffle Guerreo.

Guerreo fought with increased desperation in the seventh round and likely won the round based on his aggression. However, that aggression disappeared in the eighth round and Peralta used his height to his advantage with an effective and accurate jab.

Peralta had Guerreo backing up in the ninth round and was more willing to throw combinations and even sent Guerreo backwards into the corner with a hard straight right hand. Guerreo hit the ropes and was able to pop back up, but would have been knocked down if the ropes were not there. The ninth round was a very strong round for Peralta.

Peralta’s punches were snapping the head of Guerreo in the tenth round and Guerrero was not able to launch an effective offensive attack in the eleventh.
There were a lot of close rounds, but this writer felt Peralta was ahead on the scorecards going into the twelfth and final round. Peralta finished strong by looking like the fresher fighter and by being the aggressor.

The judges scored the bout 115-113 Peralta, 115-113 Guerrero, 116-112 Peralta in a major upset.

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PBC on NBC Results: Browne wins controversial SD; Glowacki defends his Title & Spence dominates in 5


PBC on NBC Results: Browne wins controversial SD; Glowacki defends his Title & Spence dominates in 5
By: Matt Becher

Live from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, Premier Boxing Champions put on an exciting fight card live on NBC Primetime. Undefeated Light Heavyweights Marcus Brown and Radivoje Kalajdzic mixed it up, looking to take another step up the ladder in their weight division. The fight was ugly and ended with a controversial decision

Krzysztof Glowacki was able to defend his WBO Cruiserweight title for the first time against fading veteran Steve Cunningham. Though Cunningham was able to put up a valiant effort, the story of the night was how tough Glowacki really might be.

The main event was a showcase for Spence Jr. The former Olympian may just be the next big thing to hit the sport. He lived up to his reputation and maybe even surpassed it. Knocking out a former world champion with relative ease, something that Provodnikov, Pacquiao and Khan could not do.

Photo Credit: Lucas Noonan / Premier Boxing Champions

Marcus Browne (17-0 13KO) v. Radivoje Kalajdzic (21-0 14KO): Light Heavyweight

This fight started off ugly, and pretty much stayed that way for its entirety. Browne was able to score a knockdown in the first round, but it looked more to have been a slip by Kalajdzic. Both fighters fought recklessly through the fight, throwing wild punches, with little defense.

Browne looked more like an amateur and not a fighter moving his way up. Kalajdzic fought in enemy territory and was able to floor Browne with a very nice combination that legitimately hurt Browne.

The final three rounds were Kalajdzic hitting Browne and Browne holding on. The score cards were close, but it seemed to have swung the wrong way. Even the crowd booed the local man’s Split Decision victory.

Browne SD8 76-75 & 76-74 Browne, 76-74 Kalajdzic

Krzysztof Glowacki (25-0 16KO) v. Steve Cunningham (28-7-1 13KO): WBO Cruiserweight title

A great deal may have been seen tonight in the Cruiserweight division, and that is the newest champion Krzysztof Glowacki is going to be around for a while.

Glowacki started out fast landing a counter left in the second round, putting Cunningham down within the first 30 seconds of the round. Another exchange quickly there after saw Cunningham go down for a second time in the second round. Glowacki has great power. Cunningham was able to land his jab effectively for most of the fight, but would get caught with a power counter at the end of most of his exchanges.

Glowacki took some power shots that would have put most Cruisers on their backs, maybe even some heavyweights, but he never wavered. Glowacki showed that his chin was just as strong as his left hand.

In the 9th round Cunningham showed a bit of a comeback, but seemed to be bothered by a swelling over his right eye caused by an accidental head butt. In the 10th Glowacki was able to land a short right hook that put Cunningham down for a third time. Cunningham came back fiercely with two flush right hands to the chin of Glowacki, but to no effect.

The final round was action packed, both guys going for a knockout, Glowacki again came out with the better shots in the final round, dropping Cunningham and winning a Unanimous Decision.
Glowacki UD10 116-108, 115-109(2x)

Errol Spence Jr. (19-0 16KO) v. Chris Algieri (21-2 8KO): Welterweight

Spence came out of the corner with a chip on his shoulder. He immediately showed off his speed and power. He landed thunderous body blows to the ribs and mid-section of Algieri. Algieri would occasionally test Spence’s chin, but it was to no avail. Spence had no respect for any of Algieri’s power.

In the fourth round Algieri ate a crisp left hand on the jaw that sent him to the canvas. He was able to survive the round. It wouldn’t last much longer. The fifth round had Spence come out fast and knock down Algieri. A worn down former champ, Algieri, gamely got up, only to be swarmed by Spence, who knocked down Algieri again. Spence may be the next big thing to the sport, he certainly proved himself tonight.

Spence KO5 2:12

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