Tag Archives: Kings

The Return of Frank De Alba Friday at Sands in Bethlehem, PA


By: Ken Hissner

Marshall Kauffman’s King’s Promotions return’s to the Sand’s Event Center Friday night with their second show in a week. It’s been a year since southpaw Frank De Alba, 22-2-2 (9), of Reading, PA, had his last fight in defeating Ryan Kielczweski, 26-2 at the Sands Event Center in Bethlehem, PA. On Friday he will return to the Sands Casino in the main event taking on O’Shaquie “Ice Water” Foster, 12-2 (8), of Houston, TX, over 10 rounds in the Super Featherweight division.

De Alba’s last two fights have been cancelled out to the disappointment of his loyal fans. He is on a five fight win streak since losing to Omar “Big O” Douglas, then 15-0 at the Sands in 2015. That was his only ten rounder and Friday will be his second. His opponent is a former national amateur champion with over 100 amateur fights and was in the 2012 Olympic Trials.

The co-feature features Cruiserweight Luther Smith, 9-2 (8), of Bowie, MD, takes on ever dangerous Elvin “KoKo” Sanchez, 8-3-1 (6), of Paterson, NJ, over 8 rounds. Welterweight Craig Callaghan, 17-1 (7), of the UK fighting out of Houston, TX, takes on Cesar Soriano Berumen, 28-37-2 (17), of Iztacalco, MEX, over 8 rounds.

Featherweight Juan Sanchez, 5-0 (2), of Allentown, PA, takes on Vincent Jennings, 5-4-1 (4), of Grand Rapids, MI, over 6 rounds. Welterweight Jesus Perez, 3-0 (1), of Reading, PA, takes on Anthony Sonnier, 3-0 (2), of Seattle, WA, over 6 rounds.

Welterweight Denis Okoth, 2-0-1 (1), fought a week ago at the 2300 Arena in South Philadelphia scoring a mild upset defeating Philly’s Rasheed Johnson, 3-1. He takes on Philly’s Greg “Lil Greg” Jackson 8-5-1 (2), over 4 rounds. Featherweight Martino Jules, 3-0 (0), of Allentown, PA, takes on Phillip Davis, 1-1-1 (0), of Worcester, MASS, over 4 rounds. Super Welterweight Laured Stewart, 3-0 (2), of Guyana fighting out of Sydney, Australia, takes on James Robinson, 4-9-4 (1), of York, PA, over 4 rounds.

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Cintron in No-Contest and Fox Wins at Sands in Bethlehem


By: Ken Hissner

Tuesday night at the Sands Event Center Marshall Kauffman’s Kings Promotion put on an 8 bout card featuring former champion Kermit Cintron and up and coming Mykal Fox in co-feature bouts.

In the co-feature former IBF Welterweight champion now Super Welterweight Kermit “El Asesino” Cintron, 39-6-3 (30) , of Reading, PA, and “Marvelous” Marcus Taylor, 8-1 (0) , of Houston, TX, was ruled no-contest at 0:35 of the third round due to clash of heads with an eye injury to Cintron.

In the first round already too many clinches. Referee Eric Dali warned Taylor for punching in the back and then behind the head of Cintron. In the second round Taylor landed a low blow causing referee Dali to give Cintron several minutes to re-coup. Cintron would lead with a jab but Taylor was not co-operating. In the third round due to an accidental clash of the heads Cintron’s right eye was near closed causing referee Dali to bring in the ring physician. The fight was called off by the ring physician. It was ruled no-contest in a scheduled 8. It could have been a DQ in favor of Cintron.

“I was looking for my 40th win. The referee did his job in warning his dirty tactics,” said Cintron. The first head butt cut Cintron’s forehead and the second a gash over the right eye. Joe Pastore is his trainer.

In the co-feature Super Lightweight southpaw Mykal “The Professor” Fox, 16-0 (4) , of Forestville, MD, won a hard fought decision over Ricardo Garcia, 14-2 (9) , of Dominican Republic, over 8 rounds.

In the first round the taller Fox used his reach jabbing while Garcia came forward going to the body well. In the second round Garcia seemed to come back taking the round with body work. Garcia’s left eye was closing by the end of the round. In the third round Garcia with left eye closing had problems with the southpaw Fox right jab. In the fourth round Garcia came back to even the score with overhand rights and inside body work.

In the fifth and sixth rounds Garcia walked into straight lefts from Fox. Though Garcia’s left eye was near closing he never stopped forcing the action. Garcia took the fifth and Fox seemed to do enough to take the sixth round though close.

In the seventh round a Fox right hook to the chin dropped Garcia who was up immediately taking the 8 count from referee Gary Rosato. In the eighth and final round Fox kept the jab working while Garcia did quite a bit of missing with hay makers.

Judge Poturaj had it 77-74 while judges Morgan and Weisfeld had it 78-73. This writer had it 77-74.

“I used my jab well. I got head butted (cut on forehead) but felt I controlled the fight,” said Fox.

Heavyweight Colby Madison, 6-0-1 (4) , of Owings Mills, MD, defeated southpaw Dante “Mr. Snuggly Time” Selby, 2-4-1 (0) , of Philadelphia, over 6 rounds.

In the first round Selby landed a lead left which was countered by a right of his own by Madison both to the head. Selby went down with referee Gary Rosato waving it off due to Madison stepping on the foot of Selby. In the second round Selby landed several lead lefts to the chin of Madison.

In the third round it took to the halfway point before a solid punch was landed by Madison to the chin of Selby. In the fourth round it was another slow round with Madison landing what little punches there were.

With Larry “The Easton Assasin” Holmes and “Gentleman” Gerry Cooney at ringside it looks like they could take both in the ring in a tag team match.

In the fifth round Selby landed a lead left at the halfway mark to the chin of Madison who came back with a stiff jab. It was another slow round on both parts. In the sixth and final round neither fighter seemed to go for the win. The scoring seemed out of line.

Judge Bernard Bruni had it 60-54 while Kevin Morgan and John Poturaj had it 59-55 with this writer having it 57-57.

Middleweight Blake “Kayo King” Mansfield 6-1-1 (4) , of Burlington, NC, stopped Darryl “Dreamking” Bunting, 3-3-2 (1) , of Asbury Park, NJ, at 0:36 of the fifth round in a scheduled 6.

In the first round Mansfield took it to Bunting driving him into a corner with a flurry of punches. Mansfield landed a left to the head drawing blood over the right eye of Bunting. In the second round Bunting landed a good straight right to the chin of Mansfield who came back with a right of his own rocking Bunting.

In the third round both fighters mixed it up well. Bunting got the best of it up until the final 30 seconds when Mansfield came back. In the fourth round Mansfield drove Bunting into the ropes with a straight right hand. Bunting knocked out the mouthpiece of Mansfield which was the third time costing Mansfield a point by referee Dali. Dali just prior to the bell landed a right to the head having Bunting wobble back to his corner.

In the fifth round Mansfield unleashed a vicious attack driving across the ring into the ropes forcing referee Dali to call a halt.

“I hurt him in the first round. When the referee took a point away in the previous round made me man. So I came out firing,” said Mansfield.

Heavyweight Michael Polite Coffie, 2-0 (1) , of Brooklyn, NY, defeated game Jamaican southpaw Nicoy Clarke, 0-1 (0) , of Jersey City, NJ, over 4 rounds.

In the first round Clarke landed a lead overhand left to the chin of the much larger Coffie. Coffie came back with hard left hook body shots on Clarke. Coffie landed half a dozen punches without return from Clarke. In the second round Clarke charges in trying to swarm Coffie with little success. A grazing left hook from Coffie bounced off the top of Clarke’s head. Inside a Coffie right uppercut on the chin drew blood from the nose of Clarke. Coffie has over a 60 pound weight advantage.

In the third round it was Clarke landing a dozen punches backing Coffie against the ropes. Coffie came back to rock Clarke with a right uppercut to the chin putting Clarke on the defense. Clarke started talking to Coffie and paid the price with half a dozen punches from Coffie. In the fourth and final round Coffie landed a solid uppercut to the chin of Clarke and then warned for a low blow by referee Rosato. A combination from Coffie hurt Clarke. Rosato was the referee.

All 3 judges Poturaj, Bruni and Morgan and this writer had it 40-36.

Featherweight southpaw Martino “Titan” Jules, 3-0 (0) , of Allentown, PA, won a close decision with a knockdown over Malik “Lil Leak” Loften, 1-1 (1) , of Suitland, MD, over 4 rounds.

In the first round both mixed it up good with Jules landing the better of the punches through the first half of the round. Loften came back in the last ten seconds driving Jules into a corner at the bell. In the second round Jules drove Loften into a corner but Loften came back with a left hook to the body. Loften rushed into Jules who landed a straight left to the chin dropping Loften. Referee Dali gave him the eight count and Loften was up and fighting back. It was Jules who came out of the round with a bloody nose smeared his face with blood at the bell.

In the third round Loften came charging out trying to turn the fight around as Jules met him with a combination. Loften drove Jules into a neutral corner with a combination to the head of Jules. Jules slipped a right from Loften and countered with a left to the chin of Loften. Loften landed a solid right to the head of Jules putting him into the ropes causing him to clinch. Again a right hand from Loften rocked Jules. In the fourth and final round both let it all hang out knowing the fight could be in the balance of the round. Loften had Jules holding after landing a solid right to the head of Jules.

Judge Bruni had it 39-38 while Morgan and Weisfeld had it 38-37 with this writer having it 38-37.

Featherweight Juan “Ciclon” Sanchez, 5-0 (2) , of Allentown, PA, stopped Mexican Sergio Aguilar, 2-7 (2) , of Homestead, FL, at 2:55 of the fourth and final round.

In the first round Sanchez came out firing driving Aguilar landing a left hook knocking him to the bottom strand of the ropes ruling a knockdown by referee Rosato. Sanchez landed eight left uppercuts to the body of Aguilar up until the bell. In the second round Sanchez hit Aguilar with a right to the head spinning him around making his glove touch the canvas causing referee Rosato to call it a knockdown. A combination from Sanchez dropped Aguilar a second time. Sanchez pulled a “Roy Jones, Jr.” putting his hands behind his back then throwing a punch. Aguilar got the final punch in as the bell sounded.

In the third round Sanchez rocked Aguilar who gamely came back with several punches of his own. Aguilar drove Sanchez into the ropes with a lead overhand right to the head. Aguilar did well to come back and edge Sanchez in the round. In the fourth and final round Aguilar missed with a wild right hand almost going through the ropes as Sanchez ducked out of the way. In the final minute both fighters let it all hang out with Sanchez hurting Aguilar with a right body shot. Then Sanchez followed up by swarming all over Aguilar driving him to the canvas on his back under the lower rope. Referee Rosato immediately waved it off. The local fans went crazy for Sanchez.

“He was a lot tougher than I thought he was. I did my thing (showboat) with a triple left hook to finish him off,” said Sanchez. His trainer well known in the area Louie Martinez said “he is in college and hasn’t been able to get in the gym as I would like but he did well.”

In the opening bout Cruiserweight Kendall “Smoke” Cannida, 1-0 (0) ,, of Philadelphia, defeated Leroy Jones, 2-2 (2), of St. Louis, MO, over 4 rounds.

In the first round the taller Jones used his jab until Cannida got inside and drove him into the ropes with a flurry of punches. Jones continued to carry his left low not learning Cannida can punch. In the second round Cannida switched to southpaw and back to orthodox. A right hand from Cannida rocked Jones with five more punches putting him against the ropes before Jones returned a punch. Jones landed a left uppercut to the chin of Cannida. Cannida came back with a solid jab just prior to the bell that knocked the head of Jones back.

In the third round Cannida landed a right to the body of Jones. Up until then he was head hunting. Jones came forward and got hit with a right to the chin stopping him in his tracks. Jones was warned for using his forearm for the second time by referee Dali. In the fourth round Cannida rocked Jones with a left hook to the chin. Another left hook from Cannida rocked Jones who hasn’t learned to pick up his left hand. Cannida landed an overhand right to the chin of Jones at the ten second warning.

All three Judges Bruni, Morgan and Weisfeld and this writer hat it 40-36. “I liked it a lot. This is what I trained for,” said Cannida. In his corner were Chucky Mills and former top world contender Bobby “Boogaloo” Watts, all from Philly. Cannida is a prospect.

The Ring Announcer was Alex Barbosa. On Go-Fight-Live were Marc Abrams and Mike Mittman. Timekeeper was Fred Blumstein. Kings Promotion will return to the Sands Event Center on April 17th. Per promoter Marshall Kauffman it may be his son heavyweight Travis Kauffman returning to the ring. Their next show is March 2nd at the SugarHouse Casino in Philly featuring unbeaten Christian Carto.

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Kermit Cintron KO’d by Tyrone Brunson at 2300 Arena in Philly Saturday!


Kermit Cintron KO’d by Tyrone Brunson at 2300 Arena in Philly Saturday!
By: Ken Hissner

King’s Promotions returned to the 2300 Arena, in South Philly Saturday night with a 9 bout card. In the Main Event former IBF welterweight champion Kermit Cintron, of Reading and Tyrone Brunson of Philly went head to head with Bronson pulling out a come from behind win.

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In the Main Event the former IBF welterweight champion Kermit Cintron, 39-6-3 (30), of Reading, PA, was upset by Tyrone “Young Gun” Brunson, 25-6-2 (23), Philly, PA, dropping him 3 times in the fifth to claim the PA state super welterweight title at 1:21.

In the first round Cintron is doing all the fighting jabbing and going to the body with both hands. Brunson barely landed a punch. In the second round Brunson continues showing too much respect for Cintron. Suddenly a left hook to the chin from Brunson buckled the knees of Cintron. In the third round Cintron continued to control what little action there was ending the round with a left hook to the chin of Brunson.

In the fourth round Brunson countered a missed right from Cintron with a right of his own on Cintron’s chin. A Brunson left hook to the chin of Cintron stopped him in his tracks. Cintron bleeding from the nose dropped Brunson with a left hook to the chin. Cintron jumped on Brunson dropping him with another left hook to the chin.

In the fifth round a double right from Brunson to the chin of Cintron dropped him. After taking the count from referee Clark Brunson again dropped Cintron twice more causing referee Shawn Clark to call a halt.

“I’m a slow starter but hurt him and knew I couldn’t play with him. When I fell on top of him I knew he was ready to go,” said Brunson.

In the co-feature lightweight Anthony “Bad Boy” Burgin, 10-4 (2), Philly, came off the floor in a hard fought loss to Victor “El Flaco” Vasquez, 8-3 (3), of Yonkers, NY, over 6 rounds.

In the first round Vasquez outworked Burgin. In the second round a pair of left uppercuts to the chin by Vasquez dropped Burgin to his knees face down. He beat the count of referee Benjy Esteves, Jr., just before the round ended. In the third round Vasquez landed five unanswered punches to the head of Burgin. It was all Vasquez in the round.

In the fourth round Vasquez walked into a pair of rights to the head from Burgin. A 3-punch combination from Vasquez having Burgin on the ropes seemed to wake him up but too little too late. In the fifth round Vasquez missed a combination and Burgin countered with a right to the chin. A Burgin right and left on the chin of Vasquez got his attention. They exchanged left hooks to the head. In the sixth and final round they exchanged double uppercuts to the chin. Vasquez was bleeding from the nose and Burgin from the mouth. It was the best round of the fight!

Judge Braswell had it 57-56 while judges Carter and Weisfeld 58-55 with this writer having it 59-54 for the winner.

Bantamweight Marcus “Dream Crusher” Bates, 7-0-1 (6), D.C., won a hard fought 6 rounder from Roberto “Escorpion” Pucheta, 10-11-1 (6), Jalisco, MEX.

In the first round Pucheta rocked Bates with a right to the chin and had Bates on the run. In the second round Bates landed a pair of solid rights to the ribs of Pucheta who positioned his body leaving it wide open but came back with a solid left hook to the head of Bates. In the second round it was more of the same but in the third Bates had Pucheta’s nose bleeding being more aggressive.

In the fourth round things really heated up with both teeing off on one another and talking to each other by the end of the round. In the fifth round a counter left by Bates to the head of Pucheta with just ten seconds before the bell dropped Pucheta who took the 8 count from referee Clark. In the sixth round a Pucheta right to the chin of Bates had him holding on.

Judge Steve Weisfeld had it 59-54, Lynne Carter and Dave Braswell 58-55 and this writer 57-56 for the winner.

Lightweight southpaw Jerome “The Conqueror” Conquest, 8-2 (1), Philly, came off the floor to defeat South Korean Jae Ho Kim, 6-4-1 (2), of Philly, over 6 rounds.

In the opening round Kim came right out landing a hard right to the midsection of Conquest. Conquest came back with a flurry of punches having Kim back on his heels. In the second round Kim kept coming forward but the defense of Conquest had him missing while getting countered to the head. In the third round a straight right by Kim to the chin of Conquest put him on his butt smiling taking an 8 count from referee Esteves. Conquest got on his bike trying to stay out of trouble until his head cleared.

In the fourth round Conquest stopped on occasions fighting it out with the ever aggressive Kim. In the fifth round it was almost to close to call. In the sixth and final round neither went all out in a close fight to close out with the win.

Judge Weisfeld had it 57-56, Carter 58-55 and Page 59-54 with this writer 57-56 all for the winner.

Lightweight Steven Ortiz, 7-0 (2), Philly, remained unbeaten in an exciting win over southpaw Tyrome Jones, 4-1 (1), South Bend, IN, over 6 rounds.

In the first round Ortiz held a slight edge using his jab against the southpaw Jones. In the second round Ortiz is throwing nothing but power punches but leaving himself wide open when throwing a lead uppercut which usually missed the mark. A lead left from Jones found its mark on the chin of Ortiz who landed a combination of his own. Seconds later Ortiz dropped Jones with a right to the chin. Referee Clark administered the 8-count to Jones who got up fighting back.

In the fourth round Ortiz gets warned for the third time about low punches. Jones landed a solid left hook to the head of Ortiz who countered with a straight right to the chin dropping Jones again. He took the 8-count from referee Clark but came fighting back. In the fifth round of a real slugfest Jones landed a straight left to the head of Ortiz who came firing back. This fight woke the crowd up. In the sixth and final round a counter left by Jones landed solidly on the chin of Ortiz who continued throwing bombs. His fans were supporting him big time.

Judge Braswell had it 57-56, Weisfeld and Page 59-53 with this writer 58-55 for the winner.

Middleweight Gregory Clark, 3-1-1 (1), D.C., won a lack luster fight over Darryl “Dream King” Bunting, 3-2-2 (1), Asbury Park, NJ, over 6 rounds.

In the first round it was close with Bunting the aggressor while Clark was the taller and getting away with right uppercuts to the chin. In the second and third rounds Bunting kept chasing with both landing their punches in a close fight.

In the fourth round Bunting’s pressure finally paid off. Clark looked somewhat tired. In the fifth Clark ran with his hands down never throwing an effective punch while Bunting continued the “hunt”! In the sixth and final round Clark continued the track meet with Bunting once again getting more punches in.

Judge Braswell had it 58-56 while Page and Weisfeld 59-55 for the winner but this writer had it 58-56 for the loser.

Heavyweight Colby “Braveheart” Madison, 4-0-1 (3), Baltimore, MD, and Joel Caudle, 7-0-1 (5), Raleigh, NC, ended in a majority draw.

In the first round Madison landed a solid left hook to the chin of Caudle. This didn’t stop Caudle who was much shorter from taking it to Caudle having him trapped in a neutral corner at the bell. In the second and third rounds Caudle had Madison pinned against the ropes swarming all over him. In the fourth and final round Caudle was finally using his height and reach using his jab and solid counter rights to the head of Madison who may have punched himself out after three rounds. Then Caudle allowed himself to back into the ropes being caught by a good left hook to the head by Peters.

In the fifth round Caudle once again had Madison against the ropes landing uppercuts and overhand rights to the chin and head of Madison. On several occasions Madison landed a left hook to the side of the head of Caudle. Just prior to the bell Caudle landed a solid left hook to the head of Madison who countered with a chopping right to the head of Caudle. In the sixth and final round Madison used his jab and counter right to the head of Caudle who was looking exhausted but never stopped trying.

Judge Page had it 58-56 Caudle while Weisfeld, Carter and this writer had it 57-57.

Super middleweight Brandon “B-Rob”Robinson, 4-1 (3), Upper Darby, PA, stopped Rafael “El Toro” Valencia, 3-8-1 (2), Medford, ORE, at 2:48 of the second round.

In the first round Robinson controlled though Valencia stayed in there. In the second round Robinson did an assault on the body of Valencia who complained of low blows and got a rest by referee Clark. A right hand and left hook to the chin by Robinson dropped Valencia. Upon rising referee Clark saw enough and called a halt.

In the opening bout super bantamweight Chaise “Pretty Boy” Nelson, 6-1 (3), Dayton, OH, survived the final round to edge out Jordan Peters, 2-1-1 (2), of D.C., over 4 rounds.

In the first round after a slow start Peters nailed Nelson with a right to the head in Nelson’s corner. Nelson came back with a combination to the chin of Peters. In the second and third rounds Peters chased Chaise who countered well. In the fourth round seemingly behind Peters put the pressure on having his best round. He had Nelson holding on. Peters rocked Nelson on several occasions. Nelson landed a solid left hook to the head of Peters at the bell.

All 3 judges Carter, Weisfeld and Page along with this writer had it 39-37 for the winner.

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Big Time Main Event with Cintron vs. Brunson in Philly Saturday!


Big Time Main Event with Cintron vs Brunson in Philly Saturday!
By: Ken Hissner

There was a Tuesday night press conference at the 2300 Arena where former world IBF champion Kermit Cintron meets Philly’s Tyrone Brunson Saturday night at the 2300 Arena with a bang-up undercard.

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Kings Promotions CEO Marshall Kauffman was at the mic “this main event should be on television. We have two hard hitting fighters in former IBF champion Kermit Cintron, 39-5-3 (30) of Reading, PA, and Tyrone Brunson, 24-6-2 (22), of Philly fighting for the PA Super welterweight title Saturday,” said Kauffman.

He went on to talk about how competitive the undercard is with Anthony Burgin 10-3 vs Victor Vasquez 7-3; Marcus Bates 6-0-1 vs Roberto Pucheta 10-11-1; Jerome Conquest, 7-2 vs Jae Ho Kim, 6-3-1, Steven Ortiz 6-0 vs Tyrone Jones 4-0; Gregory Clark 2-1-1 vs Darryl Bunting 3-1-2; Colby Madison 4-0 vs Joel Caudle 7-0; Brandon Robinson 3-1 vs Rafael Valencia 3-7-1; Chaise Nelson 5-1 vs Jordan Peters 2-0-1; Nick Valliere 5-2 vs Randy Hedderick 2-7-1.

“The winner of the main event will move into the IBF’s top 15 at super welterweight,” said Kauffman.Trainer of Cintron Joe Pastore said “Kermit did this before working back to top. Everyone in boxing takes a risk when they enter the ring.” Brunson said “Thank God. I’ve been in training camp for 7 weeks. We sparred once and the winner Saturday will be from Philly.” Cintron chimed in “he’s a big puncher. I’ll do the job I’m supposed to do and come out the winner.”

Doors open 6:30pm and first bout 7:00pm.

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Josh Davis Stops Carlos Rosario at 2300 Arena in Philly Friday!


Josh Davis Stops Carlos Rosario at 2300 Arena in Philly Friday!
By: Ken Hissner

King’s Promotions returned to the 2300 Arena in South Philly on Friday night with 8 bouts and 46 rounds. They will be returning on June 24th with former champion Kermit Cintron and Tyrone Brunson.

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In the main event lightweight Carlos “Rock Hands” Rosario, 7-2 (4), of Pennsauken, NJ, was down several times before being stopped by Joshua “Dynamite” Davis, 11-1 (5), of Wash. DC, at 1:49 of the seventh round in a scheduled 8.
In the first round it was a feeling out round with Rosario coming forward and Davis countering. In the second round Davis dropped Rosario with a left uppercut to the chin. In the third round it was close with the jab of Davis controlling things. In the fourth round Rosario had swelling under both eyes as Davis wasted little energy picking his shots.

In the fifth round Rosario landed his best punch so far a straight right to the chin of Davis. Rosario was switching back and forth from orthodox to southpaw. In the sixth round a counter lead right by Davis to the chin of Rosario put him down. In the seventh round Davis hurt Rosario having him out on his feet with a right to the chin followed up by a flurry of punches forcing referee Gary Rosato to wisely call a halt.

In the co-feature light heavyweight Amir Shabazz, 4-1 (1), of Philadelphia, lost a disputed decision to Antowyan “Iceman” Aikens, 10-3-1 (1), of Atlantic City, NJ, over 6 dull rounds.

In the first two rounds it was all Aikens with little opposition coming from Shabazz. In the third and fourth rounds Shabazz started fighting back keeping Aikens on the defense. In the fifth round Shabazz continued coming forward though suffering a cut along the left eyebrow.

In the sixth and final round Shabazz kept up what little action there was in this one.

Judge Rubenstein had it 60-54 while Vargas and Poturaj 58-56. This writer had it 58-56 Shabazz.

Lightweight Tyrone Crawley, 7-0 (0), of Philadelphia, shut out Juan Rodriguez, 7-7-1 (5), of Manasa, VA, over 6 rounds.
Judge Rubenstein had it 59-55 while Vargas and Kinney along with this writer had it 60-54.

In the first two rounds Crawley seemed to have a slight edge switching back and forth southpaw to orthodox. In the third round Crawley started putting his punches together with little return from Rodriguez. In the fourth round Crawley continued to move and jab always one step ahead of Rodriguez. In the fifth round Rodriguez had a bloody nose from Crawley’s jabs. In the sixth and final round both let it all hang out. Referee was Bashir.

Super lightweight Steven Ortiz, 6-0 (2), of Philadelphia, scored a pair of knockdowns stopping Hector Rivera, 3-2 (2), of San Juan, PR, at 2:37 of the second round.

In the first round Ortiz had a snapping jab knocking the head of Rivera back. At the bell a left hook from Ortiz on the chin of Rivera dropped him. In the second round Ortiz was landing left hook after left hook until he finally dropped Rivera with one. Shortly after getting up Ortiz landed a right uppercut to the chin causing referee Rosato to stop it. Raul “Chino” Rivas was in the corner of Ortiz.
Lightweight Thomas “T.J.” Velasquez, 9-0 (5), of Philadelphia, shut out survivor Brandon Sanudo, 5-4 (2), of Baja CA, MEX, over 6 rounds.

In the first round the first punch Velasquez landed was a solid jab almost knocking Sanudo down. In the second round Velasquez started landing power shots with both hands hurting Sanudo with a body shot making him start to run around the ring. In the third and fourth rounds Velasquez was chasing Sanudo landing more hard body shots.

In the fifth round Velasquez continued chasing down Sanudo. In the sixth and final round Sanudo did all he could do to survive the body shots from Velasquez when he caught up to him. Referee was Rosato.

Judge Vargas had it 60-53 while Kinney and Poturaj along with this writer had it 60-54.

In the opening bout Welterweight southpaw Vincent Floyd, 3-2-1 (2), of Philadelphia, scored several knockdowns stopping Rafael Montalvo, 3-6 (3), of St. Clair, PA, at 1:26 of the third round of a scheduled 6.

In the first round Montalvo had Floyd out on his feet against the ropes before Floyd was able to spin out of trouble. In the second round halfway through Floyd landed a straight left to the chin of Montalvo and down he went. In trying to get up he fell back again on his butt but did beat the count. Floyd would hurt Montalvo again just prior to the bell. In the third round Montalvo was going to the body side to side when all of a sudden Floyd dropped Montalvo. Upon getting up referee Rosato wisely stopped it.

Super lightweight Titos Gonsalves, 0-2 (0), of Philadelphia, was stopped after a pair of knockdowns by Gerardo Martinez, 1-0 (1), of Phoenixville, PA, at 1:47 of the first round.

In the first round Martinez scored a pair of knockdowns from right hands to the chin of Gonsalves before referee Bashir called a halt. Jimmy Deoria was in the corner of Martinez.

Junior welterweight southpaw Antonio “The Sniper” Allen, 0-6 (0), of Philadelphia, lost a lack luster decision to Demetris Williams, 1-2 (0), Philadelphia, over 4 rounds.

In the first round it was very close with Williams landing a solid right to the chin knocking Allen back several steps. In the second round Allen had a nasty cut above his left eye from a Williams right hand. In the third round a lead right to the chin by Williams rocked Allen. In the fourth and final round of a little action bout it looked like Williams may have pulled out his first win. Bashir was the referee.

All 3 judges Vargas, Rubenstein and Poturaj had it 40-36 as did this writer.

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Carlos Rosario and Joshua Davis Headline at 2300 Arena Friday!


Carlos Rosario and Joshua Davis Headline at 2300 Arena Friday!
By: Ken Hissner

Kings Promotions will be at the 2300 Arena in South Philadelphia this Friday with an 11 bout card and 60 rounds of boxing. In the main event Carlos Rosario, 7-1 (4), of Pennsauken, NJ, takes on Joshua Davis, 10-1 (4), of D.C. in an 8 round super featherweight bout.

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In 6 round bouts will be light heavyweight Amir Shabazz, 4-0 (1), of Philadelphia takes on Antowyan Aikens, 10-3-1 (1), of Atlantic City, NJ.

Lightweight Tyrone Crawley, Jr., 6-0 (0), of Philadelphia takes on Juan Rodriguez, 7-6 (5), of Manasa, VA.

Super lightweight David Gonzales, 8-2 (2), of Philadelphia takes on Darius Ervin, 4-1 (0), of L.A., CA.

Lightweight Steven Ortiz, 5-0 (1), of Philadelphia takes on Hector Rivera, 3-1 (2), of San Juan, PR.

Lightweight Anthony Burgin, 10-3 (2), of Philadelphia takes on tba.

Super featherweight Thomas “TJ” Velasquez, 8-0 (5), of Philadelphia takes on Brandon Sanudo, 5-3 (2), of Baja California, MEX.

In 4 round bouts super featherweight southpaw Vincent Floyd, 2-2-1 (1), of Philadelphia takes on Rafael Montalvo, 3-3 (3), of St. Clair, PA.

Super lightweight Antonio Allen, 0-5 (0), of Philadelphia takes on Demetrius Williams, 0-2 (0), of Philadelphia.
Welterweight Lucas Dos Santos, 2-0 (2), of Miami, FL takes on tba.

Welterweight Titos Gosaves, 0-1 (0), of Philadelphia takes on Gerardo Martinez, 0-0 (0), of Phoenixville, PA. Doors Open at 6:00 PM and First bout at 6:30PM 2300 S. Swanson St.

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Brooker and Conquest Win at the SugarHouse Casino Friday in Philadelphia!


Brooker and Conquest Win at the SugarHouse Casino Friday in Philadelphia!
By: Ken Hissner

Kings Promotions once again sold out the SugarHouse Casino Friday night for the second straight show. They will be back in a week at the 2300 Arena in South Philadelphia with Carlos Rosario taking on Joshua Davis in the main event.

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In the main event super middleweight Christopher “Ice” Brooker, 12-3 (5) out of Philadelphia, defeated southpaw Oscar Rojas, 14-8-1 (4), of Monterrey, MEX, in an action packed 8 round bout.

In the opening round Brooker was having problems against his second straight southpaw opponent while his trainer was encouraging him to come forward. In a close round Rojas landed more punches. In the second round Brooker drove Rojas into the ropes only to be hit by countering combinations. Brooker finally broke past the jab of Rojas driving him into the ropes with body punches. In the third round Rojas landed a solid lead left to the chin of Brooker who comes back with a left hook of his own knocking Rojas into the ropes which should have been called a knockdown by referee Esteves, Jr. In the fourth round Brooker goes into a crouch and gets caught with a flurry of uppercuts from Rojas. Brooker caught Rojas with a solid left hook to the head out of a clinch.

In the fifth round Brooker came forward with a double right to the head of Rojas. Brooker drove Rojas into the ropes but got countered with left uppercuts from Rojas in a round almost to hard to call. In the sixth round Brooker landed several left hooks driving Rojas back several steps. Brooker finally lands a lead right to the chin of Rojas. Brooker was much busier as Rojas slowed down. In the seventh round Brooker drove Rojas into the ropes with a flurry of punches. Both fighters knocked heads causing a lapse in the action. A right hook by Brooker to the head of Rojas almost scored a knockdown. In the eighth and final round a counter left hook by Brooker to the chin of Rojas got his attention. Rojas drove Brooker into his corner with a double left hook. At the bell Brooker landed a solid right to the chin of Rojas.

Judges Poturaj, Jasper and Rubenstein all had it 78-74 while this writer had it the same at 78-74.

Lightweight southpaw Jerome “The Conqueror” Conquest, 7-2 (1), of Philadelphia, pitched a shutout over game Daniel Perales, 10-10-1 (5), of Saltilo,
MEX, over 6 rounds.

In the co-feature opening round with Perales coming forward Conquest landed a good combination to the head of Perales. Conquest kept the jab in the face of Perales allowing him to get any offense going. In the second round Conquest counters Perales with combinations to the head. A solid right-hook from Conquest knocked the head of Perales back. The hand speed of Conquest is keeping Perales on the defense. A 3-punch combination by Conquest had Perales head spinning. In the third round Perales finally lands a lead right to the chin of southpaw Conquest. At the bell Conquest from the corner landed a solid left to the head of Perales.

In the fourth round Conquest landed a left uppercut knocking Perales off balance. Perales landed a solid left hook to the head of Conquest who countered with a left to the head. Conquest continued to beat Perales to the punch. In the fifth round Perales knowing he was behind starts throwing punches in bunches until a left to the head from Conquest stops him in his tracks. Perales started showing his frustration as Conquest is landing punches in bunches right up to the bell. In the sixth and final round Conquest is catching Perales coming forward in desperation but getting hit in the head. Peales lands a flurry of punches backing Conquest into the ropes bringing a smile to the face of Conquest. It was Conquest the rest of the round dealing out punches to the head of Perales.

Judges Poturaj and Gradowski 60-54 and Rubenstein 59-55 while this writer had it 60-54.

Super middleweight Blake Mansfield, 4-1-1 (2), of Burlington, NC, lost a hard fought majority decision to southpaw Henry Beckford, 5-6 (1), of
Coram, NY, over 6 rounds.

In the opening round the much taller Beckford used a solid jab keeping Mansfield at bay before coming in under the jab with some uppercuts to the chin of Beckford. A lead right to the chin by Mansfield rocked Beckford at the bell. In the second round Beckford’s jab is keeping Mansfield looking for an opening landing several uppercuts when he gets inside. Beckford’s been warned several times by referee Esteves, Jr., for leaning on top of Mansfield and using his forearm to the head. In the third round another warning to Beckford for holding behind the head and hitting by referee Esteves, Jr. Once again Beckford uses the foreman to the throat of Mansfield and gets away with it. A lead right by Mansfield to the chin of Beckford had him holding on. Mansfield had a welt under his right eye by the end of the round.

In the fourth round several uppercuts to the chin by Mansfield had Beckford holding on. Beckford landed an overhand left to the head of Mansfield then Beckford fell backwards barely staying on his feet. Mansfield turned southpaw landing several right hooks to the head of Beckford who looks like he is out of gas by continuing to grab Mansfield into a clinch. In the fifth round Mansfield lands an overhand right to the head of Beckford who had his right hand caught on a rope strap. Beckford was losing his trunks as referee Esteves again pulled them up. In the sixth and final round Mansfield continued to come forward knocking the trunks of a holding Beckford. Mansfield got inside working uppercuts with both hands to the mid-section of Beckford. Beckford continues to push Mansfield to the ropes while holding him completely out of gas. Mansfield gets in several rights at the bell almost knocking Beckford off his feet.

Judges Poturaj 57-57, Gradowski and Jasper had it 58-56 while this writer had it 57-57.

Cruiserweight southpaw Sam Orapeza, 2-0 (1), of Philadelphia, scored a pair of knockdowns in a wild brawl defeating Kyle McNutt, 1-3 (1), of Battle Creek, MI, who had Orapeza out on his feet at the final bell in a 4 round bout.

In the opening round McNutt came out using his jab as Orapeza was throwing leather to the body an ending it with a solid left to the head of McNutt. A lead straight left by Orapeza to the chin of McNutt and down he went taking the count of referee Bashir. A lead left by Orapeza to the head of McNutt drove him into the ropes. In the second round both fighters exchanged shots to the head. Orapeza was landing lead lefts to the head with McNutt covering up. McNutt came back with a good body attack. A lead left by Orapeza to the chin of McNutt rocked him. McNutt landed several uppercuts making Orapeza fall into him. Then McNutt ended the round with three left hooks to the head of Orapeza. In the third round McNutt used his jab well while Orapeza may be tiring. Orapeza came back driving McNutt into the ropes but McNutt countered Orapeza back blooding his nose. Orapeza with his many backers screaming for him started throwing punches in bunches. In the fourth and final round a lead right by McNutt landed well on the chin of Orapeza who came back landing an overhand left on the chin of McNutt dropping him to the canvas. Referee Bashir gave him the 8 count. Both fighters landed solid punches as McNutt had Orapeza out on his feet at the bell.

Judges Jasper 38-37, Gradowski 39-35 and Rubenstein 39-36 with this writer having it 39-36.

Super lightweight Jeffrey Torres, 3-0 (1), of Philadelphia, defeated southpaw Kashon Hutchinson, 2-3 (1), of Reading, PA, over 4 rounds.

In the opening round Hutchinson used a jab to keep Torres at bay. Hutchinson landed a left uppercut to the mid-section of Torres whose defense is wide open with hands to his side. In the second round Torres landed a left hook to the chin of Hutchinson knocking him back several steps. Torres pinned Hutchinson against the ropes getting half a dozen punches in before Hutchinson spun out. A solid left hook by Torres at the ten second mark was followed by another seconds later knocking the mouthpiece out of Hutchinson. In the third round both boxers were exchanging head shots forgetting the body blows. Hutchinson landed a 3-punch combination with no return from Torres. A counter left hook by Torres rocked Hutchinson. In the fourth and final round Hutchinson started using his jab as he did in the first round but Torres was countering with lead rights to the head. Torres can’t miss with those lead rights down the pike landing on Hutchinson’s head.

Judges Rubenstein and Poturaj 39-37 and Gradowski 40-36 with this writer 39-37.

Bantamweight Harold Lopez, 1-0-1 (1), of Allentown, PA, scoring a knockdown had to settle for a draw with Basyzber Baratov, 2-1-2 (0), of Philadelphia, over 4 rounds.

In the opening round a counter right to the head from Lopez rocked Baratov. Half a round later it was Baratov with a right to the head rocking Lopez. There was no feeling out in this round. In the second round Baratov rocked Lopez with a combination to the head. In this round there were more wild misses than punches landed. In the third round a Baratov lead right caught Lopez on the side of his head getting his attention. Lopez landed a straight right to the chin of Baratov driving him into the ropes. Baratov came back with a right to the head of Lopez. Then Lopez rocked Baratov into the ropes and shortly after dropped him with another right which was a questionable call by referee Bashir. In the fourth and final round both are swinging for the fences with as many misses as hits. It got very sloppy in there until Lopez rocked Baratov with a right to the chin.

Judges Gradowski 39-38 Lopez, Rubenstein and Jasper a 38-38 draw, and this writer 38-37 Lopez.

In the opening bout super featherweight Chaise Nelson, 5-1 (3), of Dayton, OH, came off the canvas to gain a narrow decision over southpaw Bryan Nevarez, 2-5-1 (1), of Carolina, PR,

Nelson took the first and was winning the second round when a straight left from Nevarez dropped him just before the bell. Referee Esteves, Jr. counted as the bell sounded and Nelson was up. In round three Nelson came back to take a close round. In the fourth and final round both boxers were trying for the knockout. Elson was landing some haymakers but Nevarez hung in there.

Judges Rubenstein, Jasper 38-37 Gradowski 39-37 this writer 38-37.

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Tyrone Brunson Wins split decision over Brandon Quarles in Philly Saturday!


Tyrone Brunson Wins split decision over Brandon Quarles in Philly Saturday!
By: Ken Hissner

Kings Promotions had a packed house at the SugarHouse Casino Saturday with a good under card with the co-feature and main event falling short of expectations. The fans seemed to enjoy the action overall

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In the main event middleweight Tyrone “Young Gun” Brunson, 24-6-2 (22), of Philly, took a mauling split decision over Brandon “The Bulldog” Quarles, 18-4-1 (9), of Alexandria, VA, over 8 dull rounds.

In the opening round there wasn’t much action but seemed Quarles did the most work. In the second round Quarles had Brunson on the ropes and then would get tied up by Brunson. In the third round it was more of the same and not until seconds to go in the round did referee Steve “SS” Smoger called time so Brunson’s corner would put his mouthpiece in. In the fourth round Brunson got his best punch of the night in with a left hook to the chin of Quarles who would come back and do the same to Brunson.

In the fifth round Brunson started throwing bombs having Quarles in a defensive mode. Then by the end of the round it was Quarles out punching Brunson for the first real fighting round of the fight. In the sixth round Brunson put some punches together in one of the better rounds of this fight. In the seventh round it was Brunson holding on. Halfway through the round they decided to start fighting again. Brunson had a welt under his left eye as Quarles seemed to get the better of the mix. In the eighth and final round Brunson started moving around and clowning like he had the fight won. Then they started fighting ending a not so good bout.

Judges had it 77-75 for each boxer with the final judge 78-74 for Brunson. This writer had it 77-75 for Quarles.

In the co-feature super lightweight David “Two Gunz” Gonzales, 8-2-2 (2), of Philly, lost a split decision to Juan Rodriguez, 7-6-1 (5), of Haymarket, VA, due to point take from him over six rounds. This was more of a wrestling match thanks to Rodriguez.

In the opening round Gonzales used and effective double jab while Rodriguez would land a punch and immediately tie up Gonzales. Referee Eric Dali warned him for continuous holding. In the second round Gonzales was very frustrated with the holding from Rodriguez and threw little while Rodriguez would continue to land a punch and grab Gonzales. In the third round an overhand right by Rodriguez had Gonzales holding and receiving a warning from referee Dali. Rodriguez bull rushed Gonzales and almost pushed him out of the ring.

In the fifth round it’s turned into a UFC match with both holding. Gonzales finally got in a flurry of punches. In the sixth and last round of a wrestling match referee Dali surprised by taking a point from Gonzales not Rodriguez.

Judge’s had it 57-56 for both with the final vote 58-55 for Rodriguez. This writer had it 57-56 for Rodriguez due to the point taken from Gonzales.

Lightweight southpaw “Mighty” Mike Fowler, 5-6 (2), Milwaukee, WI, got blown out by southpaw Victor “El Flacco” Vazquez, 7-2 (3), of Yonkers, NY, at 1:38 of the first round.

In the opening round it was all Vasquez who landed a crushing right to the right ear of Fowler who took the count by referee Dali on a knee holding his ear. Vasquez entered the ring in a red superman cape.

Lightweight Carlos “Rock Hands” Rosario, 7-1 (4), of Pennsauken, NJ, scored a technical stoppage at 0:46 of the third round over Lance “Lay Them Down” Williams, 7-8 (7), Muscatine, IA, in the third round of a scheduled six. It was an exciting short lived bout.

In the opening round it was all Rosario going to the body with Williams on the defense. In the second round a lead right by Rosario to the chin of Williams dropped him but he was up immediately and took the 8-count from referee Smoger. Shortly later it was Williams landing a right to the chin of Rosario dropping him. He too was up immediately taking the 8-count from referee Smoger. In the third round Rosario came right out landing a smashing right to the chin of Williams and down he went. He beat the count but was in no condition to continue. Referee Smoger waved it off.

Welterweight southpaw Vincent Floyd, 2-2-1 (0), of Philly, stopped Blaine “Styles” Donkor, 0-1 (0), Wash DC, at 1:35 of the second round.

In the opening round Floyd went right after Donkor having him on the ropes for both the first round. In the second round he had Donkor out on his feet against the ropes when referee Smoger wisely called a halt.

Light heavyweight Brandon “Brob” Robinson, 2-1 (1), of Upper Darby, PA, scored a knockdown in shutting out southpaw Lamont McLaughlin, 0-1 (0), of Philly, in a very exciting 4.

In the opening round both fighters to the delight of the fans went at each other. The round went back and forth with southpaw McLaughlin possibly holding an edge. In the second round a lead right by Robinson stopped McLaughlin in his tracks. A left hook by Robinson knocked McLaughlin back several steps into a corner. Both exchanged punches one after the other to the chin. The fans were on their feet for this two.

In the third round Robinson has McLaughlin against the ropes with both throwing punches. Robinson had McLaughlin in a corner with little in return. Considering both are in their debut the fans are treating this like it’s the main event. In the fourth and final round a combination from Robinson dropped McLaughlin who was up immediately as referee Dali gave him the 8-count. McLaughlin came forward and walked right into a left hook. McLaughlin came back and rocked Robinson with a lead left to the chin. The fans sure enjoyed this one.

All 3 judges had it 40-35 while this writer had it 39-36.

Cruiserweight southpaw Sam Orapeza, 1-0 (0), of Philly, landed a vicious left to the chin of Joe Parkinson, 0-1 (0), of Philly, knocking him out before he hit the canvas at 0:35 of the first round for about 5 minutes before the EMT revived Parkinson. Referee Smoger immediately called it a knockout.

In the opening bout of the night super middleweight Sharif “Bam Bam” Jones, 0-1-1 (0), Philly, was lucky to get a draw with southpaw Edward “The Hunter” Ortiz, 3-0-1-1, (0), San Antonio, TX, over 4 rounds.

Talk about a feeling out round this was it. In the second round Ortiz worked the body of Jones having him against the ropes. Jones landed a nice 3-punch combination just prior to the bell. In the third round a fight broke out. Ortiz kept Jones on the ropes mostly going to the body except on one occasion a lead left from the southpaw rocked Jones on the chin. In the fourth and final round Ortiz had Jones out on his feet. Jones kept trying to hold to get through the round. Referee Dail warned him on this.

Judge Frisca had it 39-37 Ortiz, Judges Carter and Rubenstein 38-38. This writer had it 40-36 for Ortiz. The fans were not happy with out of towner Ortiz not getting the decision.

Kings will be having a big event per ring announcer Alex Barbosa on March 17th in Reading with Travis “My Time” Kauffman taking on Amir “Hardcore” Mansour.

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Manos de Piedra: The Life of Roberto Duran


Manos de Piedra: The Life of Roberto Duran
By: Matthew N. Becher

​From the small country of Panama came one of the greatest boxers the world has ever known. Roberto Duran was born in El Chorrillo in 1951 and would grow up to be a four division world champion and boxing hall of famer. He would forever leave an impact on the sport and put his country on the map.

​Duran turned pro in February of 1968, at the age of 16. He would win that fight, and go on to win his next 31 fights, most of which took place in his native Panama. He fought at Lightweight and in that time would make a stop, at the age of 21, to fight Ken Buchanan for the WBA lightweight title at the most famous Arena in the world, Madison Square Garden. During this fight, Duran would formally introduce himself to the world, by winning his first of many titles and showing off his incredibly punching power. The same year Duran would lose his first title and fight to Esteban De Jesus, which he would avenge two years later in a rematch.

​For the next ten years Duran would stay atop the division, Unifying titles, until he decided to move up and challenge for the WBC welterweight belt, in 1980, against the undefeated American, Sugar Ray Leonard. This would be Duran’s most famous and impressive victory, as he beat Sugar Ray up from bell to bell. Duran showed the world that his brute force and fighting style was superior to the beloved Leonard’s speed and flashiness. He would become the best fighter in the world.

​5 months later, in the rematch, Duran would be part of another famous fight, the “no mas” fight. Duran quit in the middle of the eighth round, in a fight he was losing to Leonard, by telling the ref “no mas” (no more). Many stories have been told about why Duran stopped the fight. From stomach cramps to exhaustion to just being frustrated with the style and show that Leonard was displaying that particular evening. It would haunt Duran for the rest of his life.

​Duran would win and lose some more in the 1980s, winning a title in a third division by knocking out Davey Moore for the WBA super middleweight title. In his very next fight that year (1983) Duran would lose a hard fought decision against one of the greatest Middleweights of all time, Marvelous Marvin Hagler. His next fight after that would be another loss, back down in weight against Thomas Hearn’s.

​Even in defeat, Duran was still attempting to fight the greatest fighters of the era, regardless of weight class. He cemented himself as one of the “Four Kings” of boxing, a group of fighters consisting of himself, Leonard, Hearn’s & Hagler. They were the best of the best, strewn across weight classes, all meeting in the ring to prove who the best was. Duran was the lightest, which never even entered his mind. He took each one on, and established himself as one of the best ever.

​Duran would eventually become the middleweight champion of the world by defeating the extremely talented Iran Barkley in 1989. It was Ring Magazines “Fight of the Year” and it made Duran only the 3rd fighter to ever win titles in four weight classes.

​Roberto Duran would keep fighting into the 90s, taking on fighters like Vinny Pazienza, Hector “Macho” Camacho and William Joppy. His last fight took place in 2001 against the Hall of Famer Camacho. It would be Duran’s 119th fight. A career that spanned five decades. He fought his first fight in 1968 and his last in 2001….33 years.
​The man known as “Manos de Piedra” (Hands of Stone) would compile a records of 103 wins, 16 losses and 70 of his wins coming by way of knockout. He rose from extreme poverty in his native Panama to become the first man to ever beat Sugar Ray Leonard. His legacy will always be cemented as one of the greatest fighters ever. In 1999, the Associated Press rated him as the greatest lightweight and the seventh greatest fighter of the century. Ring Magazine would later name him also as the greatest lightweight ever and the 5th best fighter of the past 80 years. Duran would be inducted into the International boxing hall of fame exactly 5 years after his retirement in 2007.

Édgar Ramírez and Robert De Niro star in HANDS OF STONE

​On August 26th, a biographical film will be released about the life of the great Roberto Duran called, fittingly enough “Hands of Stone”, Edgar Ramirez will depict the great champion, as well as Robert DeNiro as Ray Arcel and Usher Raymond as Ray Leonard. It is a film that will need to fit a lot of information into a small time frame. Fifty years of fighting and historical boxing moments. One thing is for sure, they couldn’t have picked a better figure in the sport to make a movie about.

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