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PBC on Fox Results: Alexander and Ortiz fight to a Draw.


by Eric Lunger

Tonight, on PBC on Fox, the talented but enigmatic Victor Ortiz (32-6-2, 25 KOs) took on former world champion Devon Alexander (27-4, 14 KOs) in a twelve-round welterweight clash. No belt was on the line, but both fighters knew what was at stake: the winner would have a meaningful claim in the deep welterweight division, while the loser very well might mark the end of his career.

In a close, professional first round, both men boxed from range, and Alexander just nipped the round, landing one clean shot. Ortiz was looking to land a lead hook in the second round, feinting his way in. Alexander’s hand speed was noticeable, however, and Ortiz suffered a cut on his forehead. It was another extremely close round. Alexander looked the better fighter in the third round, showing world-class accuracy and speed.

In the fourth, Alexander continued to land precise shots, with Ortiz’s left eye noticeably swelling. The pattern continued in the middle rounds, with Ortiz trying to feint his way in, but Alexander timing him with precise, short shots. Ortiz did get inside at the end of the fifth, but could not do any significant damage. In the seventh, Ortiz bulled his way in, and there was a lot of leather exchanged at close range. The eighth was an exciting round, two professionals exhibiting a high level of skill and courage. It might have been Ortiz’s best round, but Alexander seemed none daunted.

The ninth was full of action, but Alexander’s footwork allowed him to dictate the range (most of the time), and thus Ortiz could not make it an inside brawl. In the eleventh, Ortiz was looking to land some wide hooks, while Alexander remained sharp and accurate. In the final frame, Ortiz fought with urgency but he seemed unable to summon enough energy after a tough and exhausting effort. For a fighter who has taken a lot of criticism regarding his heart, Ortiz fought like a lion.

The scorecards came a stunner. Inexplicably, a majority draw with two cards 114-114, and one card 115-113 for Ortiz.

In the co-feature, undefeated prospect Caleb “Sweet Hands” Plant (16-0, 10 KOs) took on rugged and experienced Rogelio “Porky” Medina (38-8, 32 KOs) in a twelve-round world title eliminator at 168 pounds. Sold as America vs. Mexico, the storyline was more interesting as undefeated prospect against tested and tough veteran. Medina failed to make weight, however, and appeared in the ring with a brace on his left knee.

Plant showed a strong left jab in the first round, taking no risks. In the second, Plant dropped his left hand, and allowed Medina to come forward and dictate the action. Plant spent a significant portion of the round back-peddling, earning a Bronx cheer from the crowd. But in the third round, Plant appeared looser and more confident, bouncing on the balls of his feet and landing some clean counters. Medina had no answers and began to take real punishment.

Medina had some success in the fourth, but Plant landed more jabs and used his footwork to frustrate the Mexican veteran. In the middle rounds, Medina could not negate Plant’s advantage in reach and Plant’s jab. Plant was winning rounds jabbing and countering, but he never seemed like he wanted to get Medina out of there.

In the late rounds, Plant remained in control, always boxing, always safe. Medina showed a ton of heart and desire, but could not make inroads against Plant’s defensive footwork. Going twelve rounds for the first time in his career, Caleb Plant earned the decision 120-108, 119-109, 117-111, running his record to a perfect 17-0.

In earlier action, US Olympian Carlos Balderas (3-0, 3 KOs) showcased his elite-level skills, outpointing Jorge Rojas (4-2-1, 2 KOs) in a four-round lightweight bout. Prior to the televised bouts, Detroit’s Tony Harrison (25-2, 20 KOs) stopped George Sosa (15-12, 15 KOs) in the fifth round, for Harrison’s second win since losing to Jarrett “Swift” Hurd in February of 2017.

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PBC on Fox Preview: Devon Alexander vs. Victor Ortiz


By: Eric Lunger

Former welterweight world champions Victor Ortiz and Devon Alexander look to climb back into the top echelons of the division, as they face off on Saturday night in a twelve-round welterweight bout, live on Fox at 8:00 p.m. ET.


Photo Credit: Alen Mena/PBC

Ortiz (32-6-2, 25 KOs) held the WBC title in 2011, losing it to Floyd Mayweather on a bizarre knock out, after Ortiz had inexplicably head-butted Mayweather and was still attempting to apologize. Ortiz, 31, has been erratic since then, winning three and losing three over a five-year span, but he is coming off a fourth-round knockout of Saul Corral in July of last year. A southpaw with a fluid and entertaining style, Ortiz is a pressure fighter who can leave himself open to being countered.

“I’m ready to give all I have to get my crown back,” Ortiz said via PBC press release. “My priority is to make a strong comeback and put myself in position to have my straps once more. I’m facing a great fighter in Devon Alexander and someone I have known since we were kids. I don’t hate him, but I won’t be his friend on fight night.”

Alexander, also 31, won the IBF welterweight title in November 2012, but lost it a year later, in his second defense of the belt, to Shawn Porter. Alexander held the IBF and WBC super lightweight titles in 2010-2011. The St. Louis native is a southpaw as well, and he brings to the ring a well-rounded style with solid defense and potent offense. Alexander has a strong jab and a dangerous straight left, but he can also bang the body with the left hook.

After battling some on-and-off health issues over the last three years, Alexander is eager to get back on track. Coming off a UD victory over Walter Castillo in November, a big win Saturday night could jump start his career. “I’m excited to get back in there against a fighter like Victor Ortiz,” Alexander told PBC. “My speed, quickness, and smarts will win me this fight. Victor checks out sometimes when he can’t hit you, so my skills will be the difference.”

With fights against Amir Khan, Marcos Maidana, and Timothy Bradley on his resume, Alexander is no stranger to the big stage. Both he and Ortiz have a lot of hard-earned experience between them; both of them are very talented. The fight should come down to which fighter can impose his game plan on the other.

In the co-main event, undefeated prospect Caleb “Sweet Hands” Plant (16-0, 10 KOs) will take on tough veteran Rogelio Medina (38-8, 32 KOs) in a twelve-round world title eliminator at 168 pounds. At super welterweight, Detroit’s Tony Harrison (25-2, 20 KOs) will face off against Jorge Cota (27-2, 24 KOs) of Mexico in a ten rounder. Harrison, a real technician of the sport, was stopped by Jarrett Hurd in February of last year in an IBF title fight. In addition, 2016 US Olympian Carlos Balderas will appear in a lightweight special attraction.

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Victor Ortiz: On the Comeback Trail against Devon Alexander


By: Eric Lunger​

​Premier Boxing Champions have recently announced that Victor “Vicious” Ortiz, former WBC welterweight world champion, will continue his comeback in a twelve-round bout against Devon Alexander, set for February 17 in El Paso, Texas. Alexander (27-4, 14 KOs) is also a former world champion, having held the IBF belt in 2013 before losing it to Shawn Porter.

​Ortiz (32-6-2, 25 KOs) has always struck me as an enigmatic fighter: a man who both revels in and fears the violence unleashed by his boxing skills. Ortiz came to boxing from a rough childhood, a thing not unique in this sport by any means, but Ortiz’s journey was especially marked by hardship and adversity. Nonetheless, he found boxing, and Roberto Garcia found him, and Ortiz climbed to the heights of the sport, eventually taking on Marcos Maidana for the interim WBA junior welterweight title in June of 2009.

​In that wild and memorable bout, both fighters were on the canvas multiple times, but Ortiz, having suffered a cut in the fifth and knocked down in the sixth, lost by TKO when the ring-side physician would not allow him to continue. Some felt Ortiz had quit in the fight, and Ortiz took a lot of criticism in the media for the way the fight ended. But the fight, in my view, was really over at the end of the fifth, when Ortiz took two thunderous shots from Maidana and was, essentially, out on his stool.

​In 2011, Ortiz defended his WBC strap against Floyd Mayweather. After failing to land any effective shots on the elusive Mayweather, Ortiz bizarrely, but with savage intent, head-butted his opponent in the fourth round. Bewildered and baffled by what he had done, Ortiz kept trying to apologize and make amends. As he did so, he apparently did not see the referee’s gesture to continue boxing, and Mayweather unceremoniously knocked him out.

​Ortiz’s ambivalent approach to this brutal sport was on display again in the second Berto fight in April of 2016. Ortiz looked good early, and scored a punishing knock down in the second round. But if you watch the fight closely, Ortiz kept trying to touch gloves at the end of the rounds, as if to assure Berto that his animosity was not personal. It’s as though “Vicious” Victor wants to mollify his boxing with a touch of kindness.

​Ortiz presents an odd combination: a boxer with elite hand speed, coordination, and power, and yet he also possesses a temperament that seems to both embrace and abhor the violence inherent in the sport. Maybe boxing is a simple sport pursued by complicated people.

​I’ve always enjoyed watching Victor Ortiz. His style is entertaining and, at times, elegant in its fluidity and logic. A man who had to grow up while still a child, a man whom life has kicked around pretty hard, and a man who found stunning success and bitter failure in boxing, this man is returning to the ring on February 17th. I don’t buy notions of redemption in sport. Redemption is bigger than athletics, and we will never really understand what demons Victor Ortiz had to face down outside the ring. Walk a mile in another man’s shoes before you understand him – it’s a good rule to try to live by. Which Victor Ortiz will we see on February 17? The consummate southpaw with punching power in both hands, or the reluctant combatant? Or maybe both.

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Victor Ortiz Back with a Stoppage Over Saul Corral Sunday


By: Ken Hissner

At the Rabobank Theater in Bakersville, CA, PBC promotion over FS-1, it was the return of Victor “Vicious” Ortiz after 15 months of inactivity.


Photo Credit: Premier Boxing Champions

Former WBC World Welterweight champion southpaw Victor “Vicious” Ortiz, 32-6-2 (25), of Ventura, CA, stopped Saul Corral, 25-10 (16), of Sonora, MEX, at 1:26 of the fourth round.

In the opening round halfway through Ortiz caught Corral with a left cross to the head getting the attention of Corral. Ortiz ended the round with bad intentions rocking Corral at the bell. In the second round it was a war with both throwing bombs as Ortiz got in the harder punches. It was an all action packed round though Corral was warned twice for holding by referee Jack Reiss. In the third round Ortiz came out strong continuing to throw power punches backing up Corral. Referee Rees took away a point from Corral after four warnings. In the fourth round Ortiz went right after Corral landing a flurry of punches dropping Corral with a left hand. He got up and referee Reiss unwisely allowed it to continue with Ortiz jumping all over Corral before Referee Reiss finally stopped it.

In the co-feature Super welterweight No. 4 IBF contender Justin “The Chosen One” DeLoach, 17-2 (9), of Augusta, GA, was stopped by technical knockout at the end of the fifth round by Jamaican Nathaniel “No Problem” Gallimore, 19-1-1 (16), of Chicago, IL, in a scheduled 10.

In the opening round both boxers showed good skills with plenty of action while DeLoach was the more active of the two but got caught by a left hook on the chin and went down. Referee Zachary Young administered the 8 count. DeLoach was up as the bell sounded. In the second round DeLoach seemed to have a clear head landing a right to the head and a double left hook to the body of Gallimore. With a minute left in the round Gallimore landed a right and left to the chin of DeLoach dropping him for a second time. Just prior to the bell it was DeLoach who stunned Gallimore with a right hand to the chin backing him into the ropes. In the third round DeLoach came out firing with Gallimore motioning to keep firing as he countered DeLoach. In an obvious bad blood match-up both were talking and fighting with DeLoach controlling the round. This was caused by DeLoach talking about fighting the No. 1 contender though having to fight Gallimore first.

In the fourth round once again LaRoach came out bombing Gallimore who pounded his own chest coming forward taking punches showing little respect for LaRoach’s power. Gallimore landed a hard right uppercut to the chin of LaRoach and followed with a right causing blood from the nose of LaRoach. In the fifth round Gallimore landed a right to the head followed by a double left hook to the body of LaRoach. Gallimore landed a left uppercut followed by a right uppercut both to the chin of LaRoach. A right hand to the chin by Gallimore to the chin of LaRoach had the latter out on his feet. Going back to the corner with no stool there LaRoach went to sit down and almost fell through the ropes. The ring physician came in and called a halt to the contest.

Olympic lightweight Carlos Balderas, of Santa Maria, CA, 2-0 (2), knocked out Eder Fajardo, 3-4 (2), of ?,MEX, at 0:36 of the first round of a scheduled 6.

In the opening round Fajardo quickly turns to southpaw and back to orthodox. Balderas landed a pair of left hooks to the head followed by a left hook to the liver dropping Fajardo for the count by referee Marcos Rosales?

Featherweight Paul “Ziggy” Romero, 7-1-1 (1), Phoenix, AZ, lost by majority decision to Adam Lopez, 4-0 (3), of Glendale, CA, in 6.

In the opening round Romero moved with a countering jab while Lopez chased landing with a jab and an occasional right. In the second round Lopez chased and landed a double left hook to the body of Romero. A solid jab and a right hand by Lopez to the chin of Romero rocked him. Lopez managed to move out of trouble until the round ended. In the third round Romero became more active with his punches while it was Lopez using a double jab. Romero is countering with a good right hand to the head of Lopez. Romero turned southpaw the last 10 seconds as Romero was attempting to go to the head with little success.

In the fourth round Lopez went right after Romero with right hooks to the body from the southpaw stance. Lopez finally got Romero into a slugging match knowing he is the stronger puncher of the two. Romero was able to get his share of punches in but looked to tire. In the fifth round Lopez landed a double left hook to the side of Romero’s body. In the final minute of the round Lopez started carrying his hands low showing some fatigue but still landing the harder punches. In the sixth and final round a big right hand from Lopez on the chin of Romero stunned him. Romero countered well but didn’t have the power to keep Lopez off of him. It was an action final round. The referee was Marcos Rosales.

Judge’s scores were 57-57, 58-56 twice as did this writer.

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Showtime World Championship Boxing Preview: Lee Selby vs. Jonathan Victor Barros, Dejan Zlaticanin vs. Mikey Garcia, Leo Santa Cruz vs. Carl Frampton


Showtime World Championship Boxing Preview: Lee Selby vs. Jonathan Victor Barros, Dejan Zlaticanin vs. Mikey Garcia, Leo Santa Cruz vs. Carl Frampton
By: William Holmes

On Saturday night a rematch of the consensus fight of the year between Carl Frampton and Leo Santa Cruz will take place in Las Vegas for Frampton’s WBA Featherweight Title. This bout will take place at the MGM Grand and will be televised live on Showtime.

santa cruz

Last year’s match was a thrilling and close encounter between the two high volume punchers at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York and it could have been scored for either fighter. This is a rematch that most fans of boxing want to see.

Two other world title fights will be televised in support of the main event. Lee Selby will defend his IBF Featherweight Title against Jonathan Victor Barros on the opening bout of the Showtime Card. Mikey Garcia will compete against Dejan Zlaticanin for Zlaticanin’s WBC Lightweight Title in the co-main event of the night.

The following is a preview of all three televised bouts.

Lee Selby (23-1) vs. Jonathan Victor Barros (41-4-1); IBF Featherweight Title

The opening bout of the night will be for the IBF Featherweight Title, and it seems likely that the winner of this bout will go on to face the winner of the main event between Leo Santa Cruz and Carl Frampton.

Lee Selby, the current IBF Champion, isn’t known for his power and has only stopped 8 of his opponents. Barros has stopped twenty two of his opponents, but also has one TKO loss.

Selby will be giving up an half inch in height and about an inch in reach on Saturday. However, he will be three years younger than Barros and has roughly half the professional fights of Barros.

Neither boxer has been very active in the past two years. They both only fought once in 2016 and twice in 2015.

Barros has shown a pattern of losing when he takes a step up in competition. Boxers such as Mikey Garcia, Juan Carlos Salgado, Celestino Caballero, and Yuriorkis Gamboa have defeated him. Barros has defeated the likes of Satoshi Hosono, Celestino Caballero, Miguel Roman, and Irving Berry.

Selby’s lone loss was early on in his career, by points, to Sami Mouneimne. He has defeated the likes of Fernando Montiel, Evgeny Gradovich, Joel Bunker, and Ryan Walsh.

Selby is the favorite going into the match and for good reason. Barros is a good boxer, but nothing more than a gatekeeper for rising stars such as Selby. Expect Selby to win by decision.

Dejan Zlaticanin (22-0) vs. Mikey Garcia (35-0); WBC Lightweight Title

Mikey Garcia was once considered one of the best pound for pound boxers in the world. But his stock has diminished somewhat since he made the decision to leave Top Rank Promotions and sign with Al Haymon. He lost several years of activity due to his decision.

Dejan Zlaticanin is the current WBC Lightweight Champion and is the first person from Montenegro to win a world title in boxing.

Zlaticanin will be three years older than Mikey Garcia and he will also be giving up three inches in height and reach to Garcia. Garcia also has more power in his punches, as he has stopped twenty nine of his opponents while Zlaticanin has only stopped fifteen of his opponents.

Zlaticanin, a southpaw, won the world title by defeating Franklin Mamani in June of 2016 in Verona, New York at the Turning Stone Casino. He has also beaten the likes of Ivan Redkach, Ricky Burns, and Petr Petrov.

The biggest knock against Zlaticanin is that he only fought once in 2015 and in 2016.

Garcia has been even more inactive than Zlaticanin. He fought once in 2014 and once in 2016 and had no fights in 2015. He has defeated the likes of Elio Rojas, Juan Carlos Burgos, Roman Martinez, Orlando Salido, Jonathan Victor Barros, and Bernabe Concepcion.

Garcia also has the edge in amateur experience, as he was a medalist in several national amateur competitions in the United States.

Zlaticanin will likely suffer the first defeat of his career on Saturday. Garcia looked sensational in his last bout and shook off the ring rust quite quickly.

Carl Frampton (23-0) vs. Leo Santa Cruz (32-1-1); WBA Featherweight Title

Frampton won the WBA Super World Featherweight Title by defeating Leo Santa Cruz by majority decision at the Barclays Center in July of 2016. Frampton was an underdog in their last match, but the odds now favor Frampton.

Carl Frampton is one year older then Leo Santa Cruz and is two and a half inches smaller and wil be giving up seven inches in reach.

Both boxers have been fairly active the past two years. Frampton fought twice in 2015 and in 2016 while Santa Cruz fought three times in 2015 and twice in 2016.

Santa Cruz is known for being a volume puncher and has more stoppage victories than Frampton. Santa Cruz has stopped eighteen of his opponents while Frampton has only stopped fourteen of his opponents.

They both have good amateur backgrounds. Frampton was an Irish National Champion and a Silver Medalist in the EU Championships. Santa Cruz won the Silver Medal in the US National Amateur Championships.

Frampton has never tasted defeat and has beaten the likes of Leo Santa Cruz, Scott Quigg, Alejandro Gonzalez Jr., Chris Avalos, Kiko Martinez, and Jeremy Parodi.

Santa Cruz’s lone loss was to Carl Frampton. Santa Cruz has defeated the likes of Kiko Martinez, Abner Mares, Jesus Ruiz, Manuel Roman, Cristian Mijares, Cesar Seda, Victor Terrazas, and Eric Morel.

The one difference between this fight and their last fight that may work in Santa Cruz’s favor is the fact that this fight is taking place in Las Vegas, which has a much larger Mexican population than Brooklyn, New York. This may give Santa Cruz the “home field” advantage on Saturday night.

However, this bout is expected to be exciting and a close one, like their last bout. Just don’t be surprised if the Mexican fans in attendance make a big enough difference for Santa Cruz to pull out the victory on Saturday and possible force a third fight.

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Three Philly Area Latino’s With Bright Futures!


Three Philly Area Latino’s With Bright Futures!
By: Ken Hissner

At a recent Peltz Boxing and BAM Boxing Promotions show on December 2nd appeared a pair of outstanding Latino prospects at the 2300 Arena making their professional debuts. They actually stole the show in this writer’s opinion.

Joseph Adorno

From Allentown, PA, the 17 year-old super featherweight Joseph “Blessed Hands” Adorno, 1-0 (1), made his debut that night stopping Guy Newman, 0-1 (0), of Lynchburg, VA, at 1:47 of the first round. He is co-managed and co-trained by his father Anibal and well known west coast trainer Robert Garcia while being promoted by Top Rank. That is some resume in itself! Garcia said “My son, Robert, Jr., told me about this kid. Some of my friends from An Antonio had seen him fight in the Junior Olympics and they told my son, ‘You’ve got to check out this kid, Joseph Adorno.”

Top Rank’s Lee Samuels supplied the following as the promoter of Adorno: Most of the kids I manage and train are Mexican or Mexican-American, and Robert told me this kid is Puerto Rican. We’re not too familiar with their culture but I said, ‘Let’s check him out.’ Robert showed me some videos, and man, this kids got that Mexican style!

I told Robert, ‘You’ve got to start reaching out to him and see if they want to meet us.’ The kid and his dad were very happy that we reached out to them. I was in San Antonio a few months ago and I met them there. I flew them in and met his mom and dad, and it started there. I’m Joseph’s co-manager and co-trainer with his dad.

“We brought him to my gym in Riverside and he sparred. He did really good. The Top Rank matchmakers, Bruce Trampler and Brad Goodman, saw Joseph spar and said that he looks like a young Miguel Cotto – you know, coming forward, side-to-side, with a beautiful left hook to the body. Man, that’s a good compliment!

“He’s got a bright future – he’s dedicated. His father is with him 24/7, and they’re humble, down-to-earth. The plan is for him to finish high school first. He’ll graduate next June. Once he graduates, we’ll do our training camps at my gym in Riverside, California.”

Joseph said, “I got to know Robert Garcia through Instagram. It was this last summer, around June, July. I post a lot of videos and stuff, like every day that I train. I guess Robert’s son seen it and was like, ‘Yo dad, look at this!’ They got on Instagram and started talking to me and we met up.”

“I went to Robert’s gym and sparred. I was there for a week. At home, I train at the Allentown International Gym. I can do it all in the ring, but my main plan is to stay calm, use my jab and a lot of hard combinations. If I have to box, I box. If I have to go get the fight, I go get the fight,” said Adorno.

“Robert Garcia is going to be in my corner with my dad. It’s going to be a great experience – something we’ve never had in the corner. They used to call me ‘Kid Sensation’ until I was 15. But now my name is ‘Blessed Hands.’”

On his amateur, personal background Joseph said, “I was born in Union City, NJ, but at age one I was raised in Puerto Rico moving to Allentown at 10. I have four brothers and one sister. I’m the oldest, then it’s my little brother Jeremy – he’s 15, he boxes. Then my other little brother is 10, he boxes, too. His name is Jayion.”

Adorno had 200 amateur fights – 178 wins and 22 losses with 65 knockouts. His experience started back in 2012 at the Ringside World’s in Kansas City, MO, a 110 pounder in the 13-14 year-old division and was the Gold Medalist. In the same tournament in 2014 he was the Silver Medalist. In the 2015 USA Junior National’s in Reno at 125 pounds he was a Bronze Medalist. Also that year he won the Eastern PA Silver Gloves at 132 pounds. Also the Junior Olympic and Prep Nationals in Charleston, W.V. at 125 pounds he won the Gold medal. In 2016 he won the PA Golden gloves in Harrisburg, PA. At the Nationals in Salt Lake City, UT, he was a Bronze Medalist.

Adorno is scheduled to fight February 3rd in San Juan, PR, and March 10th at the 2300 Arena in South Philly for promoter’s Peltz Boxing and BAM Boxing.

One of the other boxers who debuted at the same night was Victor Padilla, 1-0 (1), from Puerto Rico, now living in Berlin, NJ, and is 18 and a lightweight. He stopped Kimmy St. Pierre, 1-2, from Quebec, CAN, at 0:59 of the second round. He is trained by Raul “Chino” Rivas who also trains WBA super featherweight champion Jason Sosa.Rivas is very high on Padilla. He is scheduled to fight March 10th at
2300 Arena in South Philly for promoter’s Peltz Boxing and BAM Boxing.

Out of Philadelphiais 17 year-old Branden Pizarro, 2-0 (1),a lightweight who is trained by his father Angel at Frank Kuback’s Front Street Gym in North Philadelphia.

Branden said “my dad, got me into the sport of boxing. My older brother Angel fought and I had some cousins who also boxed, so I quickly became interested in boxing.” It was not all good for Branden, as he started his amateur career at 0-5, but he stuck with it and his talents soared. The speed and power was there for him and he began to run rampant through the ranks of national and international competitions. He eventually earned the number one rating at 141 pounds in the youth men’s division. The championships and awards came quickly. He won the Ringside tournament four straight years. In 2015 he was Junior Olympic Silver Medalist and Silver Medalist at US Junior Nationalists. The talented Philadelphian recently captured the Gold Medal at the Junior Olympics in July. He was slated to compete with Team USA at the world tournament in Russia, but decided the time to turn professional and felt that Hard Hitting Promotions was just the perfect fit. He finished his amateur career at 65-.

Branden turned professional on October 28th at the SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia knocking out Ezeqiuel Occasion in 0:39 of the first round. In his second bout on December 16th at the same facility he won a shutout four round decision over Jesus Lule, 9-19-1, who has been in with very tough competition. The skies the limit for Branden, who has all the talent and dedication to reach the highest levels of the sport.Hard Hitting Promotions with Manny Rivera and Will Ruiz have promoted Branden’s fights.He is scheduled on February 3rd to return to the SugarHouse Casino in Philly.

The third Latino is Puerto Rico’s 18 year-old southpaw Victor “The Bull” Padilla, 1-0 (1), out of Berlin, NJ, at lightweight. He made his debut on the same card as Adorno in December. He scored a knockout at 0:59 of the second round. He is scheduled to fight in Philly at the SugarHouse Casino,on February 3rd and at the 2300 Arena in Philly March 10th. He trains out of Dream Team Boxing Academy in Runnemede,NJ, under the guidance of manager/trainer Raul “Chino” Rivaswho owns the gym and who is very high on Padilla. “I also train (WBA Super featherweight champion) Jason “El Canito” Sosa and (WBC No. 3 contender) Tevin “American Idol” Farmer.Them and Victor are teammates, and we’re all like family,” said Rivas.

“I’ve been training Victor since he was 15. He’s been living with me in Berlin, NJ, since he turned 18 in November. He was living with his mother in Camden before that, but she didn’t want him to stay there,” said Rivas. Padilla was born in Vieques, PR, and was adopted when he was one year-old. He and his mother moved to Camden when he was 14. “My adoptive dad used to box amateur, but he never turned pro. All of my brothers boxed, too, but I was the only one that stuck with it,” said Padilla.

In 2016 Padilla was the Gold Medalist in the Bert Sugar Title Belt National Championships, in Columbus, GA, at 141. From there he went to Kissimmee, FL, and was Gold Medalist, won “Outstanding Boxer Award”. “They’re new and are sanctioned by USA Boxing. There were over 400 kids there – they’re bigger than the Golden Gloves Nationals,” said Rivas. Padilla fought amateur in PR before coming to the US. “I had close to 100 amateur fights, with five losses. I boxed every weekend, but since I was so young I didn’t do big tournaments until later,” said Padilla.

While Rivas was out of the country with Sosa Padilla fought in the 2016 U.S. Youth National Championships, in Reno, NV, at 132, on January 15th, 2016. In his first bout he defeated Pedro Cruz by 3-0. In his second bout he lost by walkover because he didn’t make weight to Adan Ochoa. In the 2015 National Golden Gloves Championships, in Las Vegas, NV, May 12th he lost to Malik Montgomery at 132. “I’m naturally righthanded, but when I started boxing it was just more comfortable to fight left handed. It was a lot easier,” said Padilla.

These are three highly talented Latino boxers who have a big fan base appearing at their fights. They are a promoters dream with so many Puerto Ricans filling up the arenas in Philly.

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PBC on Fox Results: Williams Jr. and Berto Win by Bigtime Knockouts


PBC on Fox Results: Williams Jr. and Berto Win by Bigtime Knockouts
By: Matthew N. Becher

Premier Boxing Champions went live on Fox prime time to present a highly anticipated rematch to the 2011 fight of the year between Victor Ortiz and Andre Berto. Both fighters have had their ups and downs since then, but have each respectively had their shots at the pound for pound king Floyd Mayweather Jr. and look to rebound and make a statement in the welterweight division.

Suzanne Teresa / Premier Boxing Champions

In the under-card, light heavyweights Edwin Rodriguez and Thomas Williams Jr. fought in a brutal affair that showed Williams Jr. land a brutal left hand that earned him a shot later this year for the WBC Light Heavyweight title.

Edwin Rodriguez (28-1 19KO) v. Thomas Williams Jr. (19-1 13KO): Light Heavyweight

Williams Jr. said it was his destiny to be one of the greats to come out of the Washington D.C. area, and he took the next step in earning a title shot with a win over Edwin Rodriguez. Both fighters came out throwing huge punches in the first round, Williams landing two big shots that wobbled Edwin Rodriguez. The second round was more of the same, with both men exchanging big shots, and assuring that the fight would not go the distance. Williams landed a crushing left hand at the end of the second round that crumbled Rodriguez and put an end to the WBC eliminator. Get ready to see Williams Jr. take on Adonis Stevenson for the title later this year.

Williams Jr. TKO2 2:59

Andre Berto (30-4 23KO) v. Victor Ortiz (31-5-2 24KO): Welterweight

The rematch was exciting, maybe not as exciting as the first, but pretty good. After an accidental head butt in the first round which left Ortiz with a gash on top of his head that continued to bleed throughout the fight, both fighters began to exchange.

Ortiz was the aggressor in the early rounds, landing a consistent short left hook, which knocked down Berto at the end of the second round and continued to bother Berto in the third round.

After some words from his trainer Virgil Hunter between rounds, Berto landed a thunderous right uppercut in the first thirty seconds of the fourth round that put Ortiz on the canvas. Berto immediately attacked, dropping Ortiz for a second time, and ending the fight, finally getting his long time revenge on Victor Ortiz.

Berto KO4 1:14

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Shane Mosley’s Raging Tweets May Reveal War with Himself


Shane Mosley’s Raging Tweets May Reveal War with Himself
By Ivan G. Goldman

Shane Mosley, recently waging a twitter war against unnamed people and forces, claims he was “set up” back when he was using performance-enhancing drugs.

Pacquiao_Mosley weighin 110506_004a

Precisely what he means by these words it’s difficult to determine. Is he recanting previous testimony? He admitted under oath in 2003 and elsewhere that years ago he took PEDs but also said at the time he was unaware they were illegal. As part of his testimony, he said he injected EPO with a syringe on both sides of his navel. EPO is an infamous banned substance that enhances endurance.

Victor Conte, who eventually did time for operating BALCO, a steroid stand in the San Francisco Bay area, estimated that Mosley endured about 20 of these double injections. Mosley also has said that Conte warned him of possible harmful effects. Mosley’s testimony, used in criminal procedures involving BALCO, wasn’t made public until 2008.

During the recent twitter rampage Mosley, 49-9-1, 41 KOs, who once sat atop the sport as the Number One fighter pound-for pound, also says he was offered bribes more than once to throw fights. Some of the characters who made the offers were clearly dangerous, perhaps even murderers, he says. You can follow his series of tweets at @ShaneMosley_ on twitter.

Mosley, who turns 45 in September, has retired at least once, but he’s scheduled to fight May 28 in Glendale, Arizona for David Avanesyan’s interim world WBA welterweight title. The winner could eventually face champion Keith Thurman or Shawn Porter if he bests Thurman in their June 25 match on Showtime.

Mosley’s promotional company financed his PPV fight against Ricardo Mayorga last August. Mosley scored a kayo, but the Los Angeles event may have lost money.

It appears Mosley got his clock cleaned in 2011 divorce proceedings. His wife Jin was also his manager and intimately acquainted with the whereabouts of assets. Famously, she even took his championship belts, though it was a temporary arrangement until the children reached adulthood.

Before their marriage struck the rocks, the Mosleys had shared a mansion about fifty miles east of Los Angeles. Mosley traveled hundreds of miles north to obtain the substances from BALCO, which was later involved in a multitude of scandals in several sports.

Mosley’s tweets about shady, sinister characters seeking to fix fights is nothing less than fascinating. You have to wonder whether some prosecutor somewhere will look into the allegations. On the other hand, in one tweet Mosley says, “Disclaimer* the stories on my timeline are for entertainment only and should not be construed as facts…. my attorneys said.” Once someone declares something like that it doesn’t enhance the person’s credibility.

So what does it all mean? I’m not sure Mosley knows himself. I imagine he looks back at a career he once hoped would be stainless and magnificent and has regrets. After his BALCO testimony became public some folks thought his decision victory over Oscar De La Hoya in their second fight should be stricken from the record. Mosley admitted taking the substances before the bout.

But prizefighting is a forgiving sport. It’s a safe bet Mosley will be voted into the Hall of Fame after he retires for good. And he’ll no doubt continue hashing it all over in his mind — what he did right and what he did wrong. Don’t we all?

Ivan G. Goldman’s 5th novel The Debtor Class is a ‘gripping …triumphant read,’ says Publishers Weekly. A future cult classic with ‘howlingly funny dialogue,’ says Booklist. Available from Permanent Press wherever fine books are sold. Goldman is a New York Times best-selling author.

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