Tag Archives: Golovkin

Golovkin Could Move Up to Super Middleweight to Face Champ Callum Smith


By: Michael Kane

Could Gennady Golovkin (38-1-1, 34 KOs) be following Canelo Alvarez to the super middleweight division?

According to Matchroom Promotions supremo Eddie Hearn that is a possibility.

Canelo (50-1-2, 34 KOs) faces WBA Regular champ Rocky Fielding (27-1,15 KOs) in New York on Dec 15th, in a debut fight at the 168 lbs division. Hearn has said talks have started about GGG taking on WBA Super champion Callum Smith (25-0, 18 KOs), potentially at the home of Liverpool FC, Anfield, next year.

If Smith doesn’t face GGG then there is talk of him moving to light heavyweight for a shot against one of the champions from that division.

“I’ve spoken to Tom Loeffler [‘GGG’s promoter] about it before,” Hearn told Sky Sports, “not since the press conference last week though

“That’s my No 1 choice for Callum Smith.

“I think it’s a fight that fills Anfield. It’s a great profile fight, it’s a great fight, full stop.

“Also, for Golovkin it gives him a chance to move up, do what ‘Canelo’ is doing, fight for the ‘Super’ title, and also for the ‘Ring’ magazine title at 168lbs.”

GGG may fancy a move up to super middleweight having competed at middleweight for so long and could set up another blockbuster with Canelo in the process, this time at super middleweight.

“If he [Golovkin] is even close to the mark in terms of weight at middleweight, it might be a good option,” Hearn continued.

“But whether he wants to take that risk before a possible third Canelo fight, I don’t know.”

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In the Middle with this Division


By: Rich Mancuso

Canelo Alvarez holds the WBC Middleweight title and last week became the richest athlete in sports with Matchroom Boxing and DAZN. Saturday evening two championships in the division changed hands and now the middleweights are the talk of boxing.

Saturday evening at Madison Square Garden, Daniel Jacobs gets his opportunity on HBO with the iBF title middleweight title up for grabs. Jacobs (34-2, 29 KO’s) opposes Sergly Derevyanchenko, 12-0, the undefeated pro formerly of Feodosia Crimea, Ukraine who has more of an amateur background.

Welcome again to the middleweight division. Daniel Jacobs sits in the middle of this, a division that suddenly is compared to the elite fighters at 147. That weight class has dominated and is highly contested.

Similar to the complexion and change of televised boxing, so goes the middleweight title that has been highlighted with Canelo Alvarez and Gennady Golovkin. And according to Eddie Hearn, promoter of Matchroom Boxing, the middleweight division has the top fighters.

“The middleweight division is class,” Hearn said on a conference call Monday afternoon. Hearn now has rights to Canelo Alvarez and said the winner of Jacobs-Derevyanchenko could fight Alvarez in May.

So the process, and as difficult as it can be, is to unify the middleweight titles. And with the different promoters, titles, and networks unifying the titles can be difficult. However, Hearn has the capability to get that accomplished and every fighter in the division will be aiming at getting that opportunity to challenge Canelo Alvarez.

“I think its a great time to be a middleweight in the division,” Jacobs said on the conference call. “A great time for the middleweight championship.”

Though Daniel Jacobs “The Miracle Man” knows this is the proper time, he sits in the middle. Alvarez is also aiming for the super middleweight title at Madison Square Garden in December but still holds the number one spot.

Rob Brant dethroned Ryota Murata on the WBA side and former 154lb world champion Demetrius Andrade defeated Walter Kautondokwa and claimed the vacant WBO middleweight title on Saturday night. Yes, in a matter of a few hours the complexion of this division changed.

And this is all good for boxing. As always, there has to be unity and Daniel Jacobs with a victory at the Garden Saturday night would no longer be sitting in the middle.
Eddie Hearn could be the promoter that gets the unity accomplished. Again, he has been at the forefront of changing the complexion of the sport with DAZN and signing big name fighters.

“You are going to see a lot of these big unification fights,’ he said. “Another champion in Andrade. Think with now the championship spreading out, three champions, the winner Saturday night is in prime position to fight Canelo.”

Assuming Jacobs gets the win, anything is possible. The middleweights have become as good as the always talked about welterweights.

“Being in one of the hottest divisions I’m looking to take advantage,” Jacobs said “Time to get a middleweight belt and campaign for some of these bigger and better fights. I don’t believe in sharing belts. I want unification ”

He added: This is a good time. The fans are the one who will benefit the most.”Jacobs has the advantage Saturday night and is the favorite. His opponent is undefeated in 12 professional fights
but is also motivated for something bigger, a piece of this middleweight title.

“This is a respected belt,” he said. More so, this is how Daniel Jacobs gets out of the middle of this pile and once again becomes a dominant middleweight.

And all you have to do is listen to co-promoter Lou DiBella. His perspective of where this division will stand after the Jacobs fight does speak volumes. That elite division of welterweight champions and contenders is in good company.

“Boxing is a business,” said DiBella. “When you get past the heavyweights we’ll see big middleweight fight after big middleweight fight.”

Comment: [email protected] [email protected] Facebook.com/Rich Mancuso

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Gennady Golovkin at Stand-Still?


By: Kirk Jackson

Ever since suffering his first professional defeat, questions surround the former middleweight champion Gennady “Triple G” Golovkin 38-1-1 (34 KO’s) regarding his next move.

Triple G’s rival Saul “Canelo” Alvarez 50-1-2 (34 KO’s), recently made headlines after announcing his next opponent; seemingly leaving Golovkin with limited options as his main objective appeared to retrieve his titles back from Alvarez via a third bout.

At the recent World Boxing Council’s convention taking place in Kiev, Ukraine, Golovkin submitted his request for the sanctioning body to order a direct trilogy fight.

Unfortunately for Golovkin, the WBC has other plans. As an alternative, the WBC approved Alvarez’s request to make a voluntary defense and the WBC ordered Golovkin to face WBC interim-champion Jermall Charlo 27-0 (21 KO’s) in a final eliminator.

WBC President Mauricio Sulaimán explained their reasoning for the decision.

“Golovkin feels left out and I’m very sorry about that. I just read a message from him. You have to understand that boxing is a stage, if the fight is very good [then another is demanded], but they had a war and I do not think it’s something that should happen immediately,” Sulaimán told ESPN Deportes.

“There was a message from Tom Loeffler, from his promoter, the message is not negative, simply that they expected that we would have voted for a direct rematch.”

With Alvarez facing WBA (Regular) super middleweight champion Rocky Fielding 27-1 (15 KO’s) Dec. 15 at Madison Square Garden in New York, that leaves the next opportunity for Golovkin to face Alvarez at some point in 2019.

Here’s where it gets tricky.

Barring injury or any other circumstance, Alvarez more than likely will fight for the first time in 2019 during Cinco de Mayo weekend. Being as Alvarez was granted the voluntary WBC middleweight defense; he can choose to fight someone else other than Golovkin.

It’s speculative and highly possible, Alvarez may face former middleweight champion and fellow Golden Boy Promotions stable mate David Lemieux 38-4 (33 KO’s).

It’s not a fight most boxing purists want to see per say, but it’s a fight that can draw decent numbers as Canelo is one of the proverbial stars, if not the most popular in all of boxing.

Bottom line, Alvarez doesn’t need Golovkin.

Chances are history will favor Alvarez when the topic of these two fighters is discussed. Alvarez destroyed the narrative casted by Golovkin and his head trainer Abel Sanchez leading into their rematch this past September.

Remember, it was Team Golovkin suggesting Alvarez “Ran,” and did not fight “Mexican style,” during their first encounter last year.

And it was Alvarez, taking the fight to the bigger man, applying pressure, walking Golovkin down and making him take backward steps for majority of the fight.

For those believing Golovkin won both fights, it’s an opinion you’re entitled to.

However, history books reflect different outcomes; with the rivals dueling to a draw during the first encounter and Alvarez earning the majority decision in their second encounter.

Both fights were entertaining and highly competitive.

But legacy wise, Alvarez has Miguel Cotto, Floyd Mayweather, Shane Mosley, Erislandy Lara and Gennady Golovkin twice on his resume. Canelo’s resume can be picked apart and dissected just like with any other fighter, but as far as recognizable names go along with fellow champions, he’s set.

Financially speaking, Alvarez can thrive without Golovkin.

Something else to keep in mind, Alvarez can always vacate his belt and fight whoever he wants. Canelo is at the phase in his career where he does not need the distinction of a world title to headline a huge fight.

At this point, his fights are events, spectacles and a world title is not necessary; it’s more so the cherry on top so to speak.

Another question to ponder with the WBC’s recent ruling, does Golovkin really want to go through Jermall Charlo, just to get to Alvarez?

Even if Golovkin faces and defeats Charlo, facing Alvarez afterwards isn’t a guarantee. Just like Golovkin defeating Charlo is guaranteed.

Regarding his professional career, whenever Golovkin stepped in up class and faced elite opposition he struggled. Canelo, Daniel Jacobs and Kell Brook are the examples on his resume that is fairly thin of elite names.

Most observers recognize Charlo as an elite fighter and would like to see him tested further. At age 37, Triple G can ill-afford to put forth a poor performance; especially if it jeopardizes future potential earnings against Alvarez.

To add Golovkin probably does not want to feature as the Litmus test for Charlo at middleweight.

Although in recent interviews Golovkin mentioned spending more time with family and hinted at retirement upcoming, it’s uncertain if long stretches of inactivity while waiting for Alvarez is the path he wants to take.

The only other option making sense is awaiting the winner of WBA (Regular) Ryōta Murata 14-1 (11 KO’s) vs. Robert Brant 23-1 (16 KO’s) later this month. If Murata wins, Golovkin could fight him in Japan, generating a substantial payday and that’s probably the preference.

With the third bout with Alvarez in question, certainly a level of uncertainty, Golovkin may be at a stand-still with limited options and limited time.

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WBC Offers Update on Alvarez-Golovkin-Charlo Middleweight Muddle


By Jake Donovan

After spending most of the past year creating a mess, the World Boxing Council has done its best to clear up the middleweight muddle.

Somehow, they have only created more confusion in the process.

The WBC unanimously approved Golden Boy Promotions’ official request for middleweight champion Saul ‘Canelo’ Alvarez to make a voluntary defense in his next fight. The decision came Wednesday during the “Mandatories” session of the annual WBC Convention in Kiev, Ukraine.

Alvarez regained his title in a 12-round win over Gennady Golovkin in their high-profile rematch on September 15 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The event was rescheduled from its original May 5 date, which was scratched after Alvarez tested positive for Clenbuterol for which he received a six-month suspension.

The delay in staging the rematch to their highly controversial Sept. ’17 draw raised questions as to when Jermall Charlo would get his due title shot. The unbeaten middleweight from Houston became the mandatory challenger after claiming the sanctioning body’s interim title following his knockout win over Hugo Centeno this past April.

Much to his dismay, Charlo was told to sit and wait out the Alvarez-Golovkin rematch before learning his fate. It now seems he will have to take one more fight in order to remain eligible for a crack at the WBC belt.

A compromise offered by the WBC in approving an Alvarez voluntary defense—which will likely come versus former IBF beltholder David Lemieux, as both are promoted by Golden Boy Promotions—was to have Charlo and Golovkin meet in a final eliminator, with the winners to be ordered to a straight-away championship clash.

The latter proposal was the WBC’s counteroffer to a protest filed by Golovkin’s promoter, Tom Loeffler in hopes of securing an immediate return go versus Alvarez. The basis of the complaint stemmed from what their side deems as controversial scoring, as the majority of viewers saw the rematch as either a draw or a close win for Alvarez.

While Golovkin’s team has gained sympathy from the media over the manner in which his record-tying title reign ended, there remained little chance of it serving as sufficient grounds to field such a protest. Far greater controversy stemmed from their first fight, in which most viewers saw Golovkin as a clear winner only to have to settle for a controversial draw.

That said, the WBC did provisionally approve an immediate rematch on the supporting conditions of Alvarez not taking a voluntary fight and a Charlo-Golovkin clash failing to materialize.

Confused? You’re not alone.

What has yet to be clarified is the terms that would satisfy a Charlo-Golovkin clash not taking place—specifically which side would have to not accept in order for the WBC to grant Golovkin a clear path to a third fight.

For the moment, Charlo is keen on a bout with either Alvarez or Golovkin, and for good reason. Each represent by far the most lucrative options in and around the middleweight division. However, he’s also rumored to return to the ring in December, either on the preliminary portion of the December 1 Showtime Pay-Per-View headliner between Deontay Wilder and Tyson Fury or as part of the first show under the restructured Premier Boxing Champions (PBC) on Fox primetime boxing series.

Golovkin will likely not fight again in 2018, and even if so it won’t come on either of those two cards. Nor is it clear which network would house his next ring appearance. The former unified titlist—who made a divisional record-tying 20 title defenses of at least one alphabet title before being dethroned by Alvarez in September—has served as a staple of HBO’s boxing series since his stateside debut in 2012.

That will obviously not be the next case for his or Alvarez’ next fight, as HBO announced in late September its intentions to cease live boxing coverage in 2019 and likely well beyond.

The announcement leaves Golovkin and Alvarez as the sport’s most high-profile network free agents. Several outlets—including Showtime (and functionally Fox, as both are tied to PBC), ESPN and new streaming kid on the (U.S.) block DAZN—are already prepared to aggressively bid for their services.

Charlo is aligned with Showtime and Fox, as is the case with all boxers under the PBC umbrella.

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WBC Orders Golovkin to Face Charlo for Interim Title


By: Michael Kane

Any hopes that Gennady Golovkin had of an immediate rematch, to complete the trilogy, with Canelo Alvarez have been dashed.

The WBC announced today that GGG is to face Jermall Charlo (27-0 21 KO) with the winner to face Canelo.

Canelo will be allowed a voluntary defense this year.

Charlo, 28, the former IBF light middleweight champion has been waiting for his chance to take on one of the two big guns in the division and finally gets an opportunity.

Charlo won the interim title last time out when he defeated the then undefeated Hugo Centeno Jr in two rounds.

Golovkin who felt hard done by the results in the two matches with Canelo may decide this is the best route back for the trilogy opportunity, with Canelo expected to fight again later this year against an as yet unnamed opponent.

With the news that HBO has left the boxing business, GGG and other HBO tied up fighters can now make deals with different TV companies which could make deals easier to make, especially with Charlo signed to Showtime.

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Subverting Expectations Isn’t The Same As Winning


By: Sean Crose

Boxing judges can be a lot like film critics. After seeing pretty much the same thing over and over again, both sets of professionals can sometimes be unduly influenced by the unexpected. Not something particularly good, mind you, just something unexpected. Boxing judges, like film critics, appear to love it when someone subverts their expectations. Unfortunately, many fans aren’t as impressed with originality for the sake of originality as judges and film critics seem to be. Take last year’s Star Wars film, The Last Jedi. Critics went nuts for it because it was so unlike other Star Wars flicks. Many fans, on the other hand, were far from impressed.

Boxing itself recently went through a similar experience. Most fans believed Gennady Golovkin clearly bested Canelo Alvarez in their Vegas middleweight title rematch earlier this month. Yet the judges, like film critics, saw things differently. Canelo, once again, walked out of a big fight with the blessing of authorities and a nearly perfect record. Why? My opinion is that the judges may have been impressed that Canelo did something he wasn’t expected to do against Golovkin, and that’s be aggressive. No matter that many didn’t feel he did enough to earn the victory. The fact Canelo subverted judges’ expectations might have been good enough for them. Again, it’s just my opinion, but I think there’s more than this one example available for me to build my case upon.

Gennady Golovkin knocked a lot of people out before meeting Canelo for the first time in 2017. A lot of people. He didn’t knock Canelo out in that first match, however. Canelo played defense and kept from being the Kazakh’s punching bag – in a sense, subverting expectations. The Mexican star walked away from that fight with a draw – even though most feel he lost that battle, much as most people feel he lost the rematch. That’s telling. Yet the power of subverting expectations can go back even further than this decade.

Way back in 1987, when Ray Leonard came back with eye trouble from a long hiatus to take on middleweight king Marvelous Marvin Hagler (his full, legal name, by the way), many, if not most, felt Leonard was doomed. The thirty year old Leonard made a great showing of himself against Hagler, though. He was slick, energetic and impressive. Leonard won the bout on the cards that evening, even though many felt his performance, impressive though it was, wasn’t good enough for the decision. The fact that Leonard survived, however, that he had managed to hold his own, certainly subverted expectations. Hagler, likewise, didn’t live up to expectations by failing to completely demolish his popular counterpart, just like Golovkin didn’t live up to expectations by not completely dominating Canelo decades later.

A piece of advice for judges – leave the expectations at the door, and just judge the fight on its merits. Hell, try pretending you don’t know the men or the women competing in the ring if you have to, just try to go the extra yard to be fair. Exhausted fans will thank you for finally subverting their expectations.

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Canelo and Golovkin: What’s Next for Both


By: Oliver McManus

With the benefit of 72 hours to sleep on things, it’s time to address what’s next for Saul ‘Canelo’ Alvarez and Gennady ‘GGG’ Golovkin after their ferocious rematch at the T-Mobile Arena and, whilst some of these options are a little more realistic than others, we can be dreamers, so here are my top picks (trilogy aside!) –

Mexican fiesta?

This one seems a little adventurous to begin with but there are two fights that makes me stand up with interest, with regards to Canelo, and they both involve fellow Mexicans in what would make the perfect Cinco de Mayo bouts for 2019 – whilst it’s likely that Alvarez would look to fight in December first, these fights could brew nicely into the early months of next year.

First up is Jaime Munguia and given the size of the WBO 147lb champion, it’s equally likely that this bout could be taken at middle as it is welterweight and we’ve seen Munguia really start to stamp his authority over the course of 2018 with the youngster playing the role of underdog in his title challenge against Sadam Ali and, marginally, in his first defence against Liam Smith.

The sheer size and explosivity of Munguia means the fight with Canelo would guarantee action – akin to the last two with Golovkin – and of course there’s that added all-Mexican spice.

Looking into the super middleweight and you find another WBO champion in Gilberto Ramirez who has failed to really find any momentum over the last couple of years despite defending the title on four occasions and Zurdo has made no bones about his desire to land a big fight.

We know Canelo looks BIG when out of the ring – I’m not even going to go near the whole clenbuterol situation – and even at the catchweight of 164 for his bout with Julio Cesar Chavez he looked comfortable. I mean, admittedly, not a great performance but it wasn’t because of the extra weight.

More of a tactician than Munguia and, indeed, Golovkin, Ramirez would represent a different type of opponent for Alvarez with the opportunity to show a different set of skills than the, relatively, brawling nature over the last few months and Canelo, certainly, is an elite level boxer not just fighter. (If that makes sense).

Munguia and Ramirez, starting to sound like a fajita, but I want to see ANOTHER all Mexican encounter involving Canelo because you just cannot beat those atmospheres and the two champs either side of middleweight appear to be the frontrunners in that respective category.

Saunders vs Golovkin

A fight that has been mooted for a long, long time and it seems that now could be the most realistic timing for the super-fight to take place and on the assumption that the WBO champion can navigate his way past Demetrius Andrade on October 20th , this would provide the opportunity for GGG to bounce straight back into the world title scene.

For Saunders it provides him with the chance to carry on with the momentum he picked up in Canada last December with a, let’s not beat around the bush, masterclass performance against David Lemieux and, whilst his antics outside of the ring have been less than respectable, in the boxing world a victory over Golovkin would cement his credibility as one of the best.

An awkward southpaw who dictates the tempo of the bout from the centre of the ring, Saunders poses a distinctly different threat to that of Canelo but is equally capable of getting dirty on the inside and involved in a firefight as he is executing a technical, counter-punching gameplan.

Golovkin doesn’t need warm up bouts following his first ever career loss, he’s an elite fighter, certainly a Top 15 pound for pound and, with only a few fights left in him, it seems logical to target the fight with Saunders because it’s one we know he is mightily confident in winning and if he were to be able to reclaim the single belt that has alluded him his whole career then, surely, we could be looking at the best middleweight ever?

Saunders vs Golovkin make sense, it’s been in the works for a long time and it’s a bout that both men are confident of winning so let’s get it on!

Canelo vs Lemieux

We’ll keep this section short and snappy because I think we’re all aware that David Lemieux, especially after the pasting he got via Billy Joe Saunders, is in a different league, technically, to the world champions but following a devastating knockout over Spike O’Sullivan he finds himself back in the fold for a world title.

The one that can’t be argued with is the power of the Canadian who, when given a chance, is able to unfurl bombs in the direction of whichever Tom, Dick or Harry is standing in front of him. Having said that, he is equally susceptible to stinking out a stadium when he fails to turn up for a fight and that happens alarmingly often for him to be taken seriously as a contender.

It’s very hot and cold with David Lemieux but even when he’s on top of his game it’s nothing that would really send Canelo back to Mexico quivering in his boots looking for some more of that steak – the threat of Lemieux is easily nullified by Canelo taking the fight to the Canadian, boxing at a high tempo for the duration of the fight with a strong lead jab.

Canelo vs O’Sullivan was being lined up for December and, thusly, it makes sense that O’Sullivan’s conqueror is also in the frame.

The truth of the matter though, like it or not, is that this would only serve as a stay busy fight until a big clash in May.

Retirement for GGG?

What is left for Gennady Gennadyevich Golovkin to achieve in the sport of boxing? With seemingly little possibility of moving a weight class, the former unified middleweight champion has literally been there, done that and seen it all.

20 successful defences of his belt, five as unified champion, the 36 year old possess a record matched only by the great Bernard Hopkins and, looking through the eras, you’d be hard pressed to suggest he wouldn’t have found success across them all.

A World Amateur champion and Olympic silver medallist, to boot, Golovkin has a career, both amateur and professional, to be immensely proud of and in the eyes of many an onlooker he has got nothing left to prove.

On many scorecards he should have won that first fight with Canelo, the second was a stormer and there can be no loss of legitimacy for losing what was, let’s be honest, a fight that could have gon either way; you get the feeling that Golovkin and Canelo could go toe to toe 60 times and it would never get boring, 20 would be a win for Golovkin, 20 for Canelo and the other 20 a draw… it’s just that sort of a fight!

But for the love of the sport and the pride he gets from fighting, there is nothing left to achieve for Triple G so, if you ask me, hang those gloves up, kick back and just enjoy life Gennady!

Of course the fight we all want to see, well most of us anyway, is ANOTHER rematch between the two protagonists of the middleweight division and why shouldn’t we want that? 24 rounds of simply stunning action during which neither fighter could comprehensively claim to be the better man, throw in some controversy, a bit of bad blood, and we have got ourselves not just a fight but an EVENT.

The first two fights were must-see entertainment that captured the imagination of the boxing community and there’s very little reason to believe a third would be anything but the same – the only question’s that really need answering are where, when and how much is it going to cost us?

Preliminary talks are being held between the parties, allegedly, so hopefully we’ll be able to see the trilogy contest sooner rather than later because there’s some unfinished business to take care of and it’s a fight that I, certainly, will never get bored of.

Having said that, what if Golovkin wins the third fight? Does that mean we’ll have to have a fourth?!

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Canelo vs. GGG 2: Robbery in the Desert


By: Gary Todd

When the rematch was finally announced for Canelo v Golovkin; I originally thought, “Why would you go back to the scene of the crime?”. They could have staged this fight in Dallas or New Yor and it would have sold out, but it wasn’t to be. It’s clear Las Vegas is the fight capital ,the Mecca of boxing, and it puts up the huge money required. This glittering town in the desert always has and always will be considered the Mecca,because money talks.

There is no doubt in my mind that Gennady Golovkin was a victim of a crime last night in Vegas. It was armed robbery in the ring. The fight was billed as “Final Judgment”, but after 12 rounds of tremendous armed combat by these two champion boxers, there was no judgment, and that was final.

Canelo Alvarez fought a great fight. He had a lot to prove, and he did answer a few questions in the ring. He fought the best he could , and he came forward while pressing and he stuck to a game plan. That game plan was to target Golovkin’s body every time he got inside the pocket. He also showed how tough he really is while taking some heavy blows. He also stayed off the ropes and fought the fight of his life. In saying all that, it still wasn’t enough to beat Gennady Golovkin.

GGG was dominant with his jab, and at one point in the fight I said to myself, “He’s winning this fight with one arm. “

I gave eight rounds to Golovin in this fight. I thought the 2nd round was close and I gave it to Canelo. I thought round 5 was close so I gave it to Canelo. I also gave Canelo rounds 6 and 8 . Other than that, it was Golovkin’s fight. The jab, uppercuts, and clean power shots stole the show.

I have been been covering boxing for a long time, and through the years I have been ringside to witness some of the greatest fights and this was a great fight. I travel alone, and when I get there, all I focus on is the fight and the fighters. There is no agenda with me. I don’t just watch the fight, I study the fight. I don’t count the punches, but I have been around long enough to know how to score a round. The judges scored this fight wrong. They have been around a long time. Maybe too long. They should all be made to sit in a room and watch the fight again and see how they scored it the second time around. 114-114 ? 115-113 ? 115-113.?

The 12th round was the deciding round according to the scorecards and 2 of the 3 judges gave it to Canelo. If you watched that 3 minutes of boxing , 10 times over, you would score that round to Gennady Golovkin. With everything at stake, these judges who are put into a tremendous position of power, need to get it right.

Like in the movies, all the good heists have a take down team, that all have a part to play, and last night in Vegas, there was a robbery in the dessert.

Gary Todd is an international author with his books on Boxing’s World Champions, “Workouts from Boxing’s Greatest Champs Volumes 1 and 2”. He has been involved in all aspects of the sport of boxing for over 25 years.

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How Will We Remember Gennady Golovkin’s Career?


By: Kirk Jackson

Fresh off his first official defeat of his professional career, questions surround the former middleweight champion Gennady “Triple G” Golovkin 38-1-1 (34 KO’s).

Questions regarding his next move, which direction his career carries into the future, questions pertaining to the very fabric and foundation for his career. This past fight for instance, why he was pushed back by the smaller man?

Succumbing to defeat via the hands of Saul “Canelo” Alvarez 50-1-2 (34 KO’s) sets an astonishing precedent, but not for the fact Golovkin suffered defeat to an elite fighter. It’s the fashion of how defeat manifested.

The fact the smaller man originally beginning his career at junior welterweight (140lbs.), walked down and stalked the career long middleweight is a bold statement. Future Hall of Fame fighter and ESPN boxing analyst Andre Ward expands on this notion.

Leading up to the rematch, Golovkin and head trainer Abel Sanchez asked, begged, pleaded for Alvarez to stand and fight, to not utilize lateral movement in the rematch, to give the fans an action-packed show, thus providing Golovkin with greater opportunity to sink his powerful punches in hopes of bashing the Mexican star.

Team Golovkin trashed Alvarez leading up to the rematch. Some of their ire (rightfully so) drew from the failed drug tests from the banned substance clenbuterol and the other part of their frustration stemmed from the results and how the first fight transpired.

However, Golovkin and Sanchez got what they asked for, Canelo took the fight to Triple G, walking him down, pushing the bigger fight back, controlling the story of the fight, as Ward eloquently stated to Stephen A. Smith during their brief debate regarding the results of the rematch between Golovkin and Alvarez.

The wounds are still fresh, it’s natural for one to be a prisoner of the moment and to make declarations and assessments to what was just witnessed.

Ultimately as time passes, data continues to collect, the tea leaves assemble and we’ll be able to make a full assessment of the career of Gennady Golovkin.

His name will forever be linked with Alvarez and as it stands now, he is on the wrong side of history.

The tweet from podcaster and editor @LukieBoxing is a fair statement about Golovkin’s career.

Digesting that statement, where is Golovkin’s signature victory against the A-side opponent? Which win was his signature win if he has one? Who is it against? Was his signature win against Daniel Jacobs, another close, disputed fight? Or is it against David Lemieux? Or perhaps his signature win was against the undefeated Kell Brook, the natural welterweight moving up two weight classes.

Addressing the issue of unification of the world titles, Golovkin spent his entire professional career at middleweight and entering the rematch with Alvarez was a world champion since 2010.

You would think somewhere throughout that long reign, unification of the division would have transpired right?

Sanctioning bodies play a role, same with promoters, promotional companies and networks. These components play part and such is the dynamic of boxing from the business perspective.

Even still, if going off the words and merits of Golovkin’s trainer Abel Sanchez or promoter Tom Loefller, the past four years or so Golovkin has been the A-side – meaning headliner of boxing, thus other fighters should want to fight him due to his stature in boxing and earning potential.

But both Sanchez and Loefller were also quoted stating no one wants to fight Golovkin because they are afraid to get knocked out.

The statements contradict each other and its perplexing trying to determine the purpose and angle for how they addressed Golovkin’s lack of great opposition and failure to unify the division.

Even Golovkin doesn’t think fighters are necessarily afraid to fight him.

As far as the fear factor his handlers attempted to plant into the minds of the public, sometimes it went as far as exposing gym wars and sparring stories – even at the expense of others. Golovkin’s sparring with Sergey Kovalev is part of the legend.

In an interview with HustleBoss, Abel Sanchez said, “He [Kovalev] was one of the sparring partners that we had. He was with me for about a year and a half.”

“Really Kovalev was afraid of Golovkin when he was in the ring. I couldn’t spar him too much because he showed too much respect for Golovkin. He just fell apart in there with Golovkin.”

For years Triple G was perceived by media and fans alike as some mythological boogeyman due to false narrative initiating with Triple G’s trainer and promoter, to be echoed by networks like HBO, ESPN and repeated by other writers and reporters throughout the media.

But for some reason, Golovkin never unified the division. The last great middleweight Golovkin is compared to actually unified the division during his reign at middleweight. That person is Bernard Hopkins.

Jermain Taylor acquired all the world titles at middleweight by virtue of defeating Hopkins.

By comparison, current WBO welterweight champion Terence Crawford acquired all junior welterweight titles, unifying the division in two years’ time, while the current undisputed, unified cruiserweight champion Oleksandr Usyk, captured every world title in his division under less than five years’ time.

Boxing history shows, if a truly great champion cannot unify the division and this can be virtue by a variety of circumstances, that great champion moves up in weight class, seeking greater and often times more luxurious challenges.

Manny Pacquiao is a prime example. Sugar Ray Leonard, Roberto Duran, Floyd Mayweather, Miguel Cotto, Sergio Martinez, Vasyl Lomachenko, etc.

The indication is if Golovkin experienced difficulty securing bouts against other elite fighters in his weight class, or experienced securing bouts against the champions holding the other titles, the logical move is forcing that belt holder to vacate or to move up in weight and seek other challenges.

But that wasn’t the path for Golovkin.

There is nothing wrong with his path, he has every right to handle his career, finances, whatever he wants how he sees fit. But when comparing him to other great all-time fighters or even his contemporaries and great fighters for this era, he falls short.

And now, the same people suggesting Golovkin is an all-time great, legendary, unstoppable fighter are the same ones dismissing his greatness in light of his recent defeat. Remember, HBO analyst Jim Lampley openly stated Golovkin’s career is a failure if he fails to defeat Alvarez. Lampley was the conductor on the Triple G train.

“He’s trying to make a statement [Saturday] night to say that he’s the greatest middleweight of all time,” Lampley said about Golovkin leading up to the rematch.

“But if he loses the fight, his entire career was a failure,” Lampley continues. “If he loses this fight, he’s not just losing to Canelo. He’s losing to the six years he spent in Europe at the beginning of his professional career, chasing a title held by Felix Sturm, for which he was never going to get a chance to compete [to win].”

“He’s losing to a decision he made about how to construct his career, that basically put him in limbo for six years and ultimately brought him to the United States as something of an underground legend. What would Triple-G be if he had come straight from his loss in Athens at the end of the Olympics in 2004 to the United States? Could’ve been an entirely different story. Could’ve been a much, much bigger star. Could’ve had a larger imprint on the history of boxing.”

For history to reserve a fonder memory of Golovkin he needs drastic wins against higher level opponents but at 36-years-old, sand falls faster in the hourglass and with it opportunities shrink.

There was a lapse of talent in the middleweight division for most of the decade, only recently experiencing a resurgence of talent with the emergence of Daniel Jacobs, Billie Joe Saunders, Jermall Charlo, Saul Alvarez, Sergiy Derevyanchenko and Demetrius Andrade.

Can Golovkin beat Alvarez in a third fight? It’s possible, it’s not like he wasn’t competitive – it was a close fight. Same applies for Golovkin’s chances against Jacobs as he defeated in the past. How does Golovkin fare against the other fighters mentioned?

Will Golovkin challenge the other middleweights or will he emulate Hopkins, ascending to the higher weight divisions, facing new challenges as the previous middleweight king before him did?

Or is he on his way towards retirement, seeking another large payday or two, aiming for further financial security?

If the latter option is the answer, securing one or two more fights with Canelo is should be the objective for Triple G. Whether it comes to fruition is another story.

For Golovkin, the context of the comparisons will dictate how he’s remembered.

World class trainer and boxing analyst Teddy Atlas implies, was Golovkin overrated; a talented fighter with good skills but with glaring weaknesses never exposed in the ring because of favorable match-ups against weaker opposition and media hype.

Which begs the question, how will we remember Gennady Golovkin?

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Mental Warfare Tactics Backfired for Gennady Golovkin


By: Kirk Jackson

If newly dethroned champion Gennady “Triple G” Golovkin 38-1-1 (34 KO’s) is looking for excuses for the results of defeat against Mexican rival Saul “Canelo” Alvarez 50-1-2 (34 KO’s), he may want to look towards his corner’s direction.

Golovkin and his trainer, Abel Sanchez, castigated Alvarez for “Running” and not fighting “Mexican style” during their first encounter last year. There is cultural appropriation and many of the HBO analysts along with other members of mass media perpetuate that ignorance, but that’s another story.

Post the initial fight and leading up to the rematch, Sanchez and company dismissed Alvarez and his elusive fight style, questioning his boxing character.

“What happened to Canelo’s body shots? You can’t punch someone when they’re running, and Canelo was running so it’s hard for Golovkin to throw his punches when Canelo is running,” Sanchez said in one of the interviews leading up to the rematch.

“Canelo knocked out Liam Smith with a body punch. That’s supposedly his favorite punch. Why didn’t he throw it against Golovkin to the body? He didn’t, you cannot punch a target that’s running.”

It appears Sanchez’s words ignited a fire matching Canelo’s hair color, because Alvarez didn’t move much in this exhilarating rematch and regularly brought the fight to the powerful Golovkin. Alvarez arguably walked down the bigger fighter for 9, 10 rounds of their 12 round championship fight.

HBO commentator Roy Jones suggested the comments from the Golovkin camp implied they would knock-out Alvarez if he’s willing to stand and trade.

This cast a narrative of the fight before it happened and when Alvarez took the fight to Golovkin in the rematch, he changed the “Story” of the fight in his favor. “Story” was a common term echoed throughout the course of their fight by HBO commentators.

To Sanchez’s credit, he gave respect towards his adversary after the fight, although not directly in the ring during the customary post-fight interviews.

“We had a great fight, the one we expected the first time around,” Sanchez said. “I had it close going into the 12th round. We had good judges, who saw it from different angles. I can’t complain about the decision, but it’s close enough to warrant a third fight. Canelo fought a great fight. Congratulations.”

Not only did the mental warfare tactics from Golovkin’s camp backfire, they cost Golovkin the fight and highlighted weaknesses from Golovkin in spite of his performance. It’s his version of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

The good was the actual fight. Back and forth action, high-paced action, competitive, both combatants displaying iron chins and gigantic hearts, placing themselves within that realm of vulnerability that is the boxing ring on the grandest stage.

The bad were the tactical errors and blame that can be placed on Golovkin and Sanchez. Golovkin has over 300 amateur fights, is an Olympic Silver medalist, professional world champion for more than eight years and the bigger fighter. Why couldn’t he stop the smaller fighter who started at junior welterweight (140 lbs.) from walking him down?

Sanchez trained a few Hall of Fame fighters and many world champions, but was there some form of advice or tactical adjustment to push the smaller fighter back to gain control of the real estate in the ring and control of the “Story” in the fight?

During the fight, Sanchez realized the hole they were in because after round seven, viewers could hear Sanchez loudly whisper in Golovkin’s ear, “You’re losing the fight.” Most of the fight was Golovkin backing up, fighting off his back foot looking awkward, robotic and uncomfortable.

That’s not to suggest you can’t win a fight off your back foot because you can, it’s just an observation of how the tables have turned and points to what HBO commentator Roy Jones suggested about the story of the fight favoring Canelo.

The ugly is the defeat and how it was handled. It was a close competitive fight, one of those fights a draw or decision either way is not a bad result – similar to the fight most recently exhibited between Shawn Porter and Danny Garcia.

But with this defeat, Golovkin lacks a signature win against a high-quality opponent. Some may argue Daniel Jacobs, but some may also argue Jacobs won or that Golovkin barely squeezed that one out. Just like some may argue Golovkin won the rematch with Alvarez, or that he won both fights. It boils down to the judges and what’s officially ledged in the history book. That’s an L for Golovkin.

The ugly is also how Triple G handled defeat. Frustration after a close fight is part of the game, it’s understandable. However if Triple G is regarded as a professional, such a nice guy and represents the sport properly, then he is not above providing a post-fight interview after losing.

The lack of the post-fight ring interview may relate to his tenure with HBO ending as this was the last fight on their contract. Regardless if that’s true or not, it’s not a good look.

And where Golovkin goes from here is uncertain. Although he and his trainer more than likely would prefer a third fight with Alvarez opposed to facing anyone else.

“I think that in this business, in this boxing business, they have to look at all the possibilities for the future not only for Canelo, but also for Golovkin,” Sanchez told BoxingScene.com following a press conference Saturday night. “I think that, as a pair, they stand to do better than any fight that either one could ever have [against another opponent].”

Fighting Alvarez guarantees more money, there is the revenge factor and oddly enough from a boxing tactical sense, it makes it’s the best move for Golovkin as Sanchez suggested.

Until the decision manifests, Team Golovkin can rest and ponder about the decisions pre-fight and during that cost them the fight.

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Can’t Be Surprised When Canelo Wins a Close Fight


By: Sean Crose

The first fight was good. The second one was better. Gennday Golovkin and Canelo Alvarez traded explosive shots at the T Mobile Arena in Las Vegas Saturday night. Both men, at the end, looked completely exhausted. Both men had been cut. Neither fighter can sustain many more wars like this one. No matter. Vegas remained defiant in its love of Canelo Alvarez on Saturday night by rewarding him with a majority decision win. It unquestionably was controversial. No matter. Vegas stuck by it’s hero. HBO’s team also pretty much stuck by its hero. Many fans will feel they got the finger. Golovkin is now damaged goods. It is what it is.


Photo Credit: HBO Boxing Twitter Account

Make no mistake about it, Canelo did good. Very good. The problem, as some will see it, is that Canelo is a favored child who will always, no matter what, be beloved and favored by those in power. Perhaps Canelo truly deserved the decision. Many unquestionably felt he did. But one can’t help but feel it wouldn’t matter if everyone on the planet felt Golovkin won – the powers that be will support Canelo in perpetuity. And this, frankly, is a major problem for boxing. But it always has been. It’s a sport that plays the favorites. And it looks like it always will. Don’t like it? Watch UFC. That, it appears, is the over-riding mentality of those behind the sport.

The truth is, had Canelo never been seen as a fighter who is favored by those in power, tonight’s decision by the judges would have been widely accepted. It was nothing if not a close fight, after all. Indeed, it was a brutal, brutal twelve round affair between two men who dug as deep as they could and perhaps even deeper. Make no mistake, Canelo deserves a ton of credit here. But so does GGG, who most feel has been denied credit on at least one occasion. So, arguably, does Erislandy Lara, who many felt bested Canelo a few years back. So does Austin Trout, for that matter. For he, too lost a razor sharp battle to the red haired star.

This isn’t to say to Canelo should have lost any of those bouts. It’s simply to say that the guy pretty much bats a thousand. Even the one fight that he couldn’t have possibly won a decision in (his 2013 superbout with Floyd Mayweather), saw one judge try her best to make it happen. It ultimately comes to this: Had Saturday night’s decision gone to GGG, many would have felt Canelo had gotten robbed, and they arguably would have been well within their rights to feel that way. The bout was that close. It’s simply that boxing, particularly Vegas based boxing, seems to have a strange rule – if you don’t stop Canelo, don’t expect to win the fight.

And that’s too bad.

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HBO PPV Round by Round Results: Canelo Wins Instant Classic By Majority Decision


By: William Holmes

The undercard featured three dominating performances by Roman “Chocolatito”Gonzalez, David Lemieux, and Jaime Munguia where they all stopped their opponents.

The HBO Announce Team had to kill ninety minutes of airtime after the last undercard ended, as the walkout wasn’t scheduled to start until 11:00PM EST. A lengthy discussion about their prior fight and controversy with the scores and result ensued.

Golovkin, the champion, came out first to a somewhat muted reaction. Canelo Alvarez was met with a mixture of cheers and boos.

The national anthem was not sung.


Photo Credit: HBO Twitter Account

Gennady Golovkin (38-0-1) vs. Canelo Alvarez (49-1-2); WBA/WBC Middleweight Title

Round 1:

Golovkin and Canelo rush out to the center of the ring and Golovkin established control of the middle. Golovkin trades jabs with Canelo. Golovkin lands two jabs and Canelo lands a right hook to the body. Canelo lands another jab and Golovkin answers with on of his own. Golovkin slips a jab from Canelo. The crowd is chanting very loudly. Canelo misses with an up jab. Canelo snaps out a jab. Golovkin misses with two jabs. Canelo bangs a right hook off the guard of Golovkin. Canelo misses with a hook to the body. They both land a jab at the same time. Canelo lands a sharp jab. Golovkin lands a good jab. Canelo sneeks in a lead left hook. Golovkin lands a straight right hand. Canelo digs in a hook to the body. Golovkin lands two good jabs in the last ten seconds. Close round.

10-9 Canelo

Round 2:

Canelo lands a reaching jab upstairs. Canelo lands a double left hook. Golovkin snaps a jab in the face of Canelo. Good lead uppercut by Golovkin. Vicious lead left hook by Canelo lands on Golovkin’s chin. Canelo snaps another jab in the face of Golovkin. Canelo goes for the lead uppercut again. Canelo lands a good right uppercut to the body of Golovkin. Canelo lands another jab. Golovkin lands two lead left hooks. Golovkin has a cut by his right eye. Golovkin lands a good two punch combination and sharp jab. Good body blow by Canelo. Golovkin with a lead left hook, and another lead left hook. Golovkin sneeks in a straight right hand. Good round for Canelo.

10-9 Canelo, 20-18 Canelo.

Round 3:

Golovkin barely misses with a counter straight right. Golovkin snaps out twi jabs and Canelo answers with some jabs of his own. Golovkin lands a right uppercut to the body. Good jab by Canelo. Good left hook by Canelo and Golovkin lands an uppercut in response. Golovkin barely misses with a good straight right. Golovkin bobs out of the way of a straight right hand. Canelo barely misses with a straight right hand. Canelo pressing forward and Golovkin lands a straight right hand. Good straight right hand by Golovkin and Canelo barely misses with a left hook. Golovkin lands a right cross. Golovkin lands a jab and Canelo lands a jab in return. Golovkin barely misses with a right uppercut. Canelo lands a good combination to the body.

10-9 Canelo, 30-27 Canelo


Photo Credit: HBO Twitter Account

Round 4:

Golovkin opens up with a left hook to the body. Canelo lands a short jab and Golovkin answers with two uppercuts to the body. Canelo lands a short jab. Canelo is the quicker puncher. Golovkin lands a short jab and Canelo lands an uppercut in response. Golovkin lands a good short uppercut followed by a left hook. Golovkin lands two good jabs in a row. Golovkin lands a hard right uppercut. They’re going back and forth and taking good shots. Golovkin lands a good left hook to the body. Canelo looks fresher though Golovkin is having a good round. Golovkin lands a lead left hook followed by two jabs. Golovkin ducks a jab from Canelo. Good jab by Canelo. Golovkin with a good right cross to the body. Good exchange in the middle. Good double left hook to the body by Canelo. Golovkin lands a good jab near the end of the round.

10-9 Golovkin; 39-37 Caenlo

Round 5:

Golovkin lands a cross to the body and Canelo answers with a short uppercut. Golovkin three quick jabs. Good hard jab by Golovkin and Canelo misses with an uppercut. Good uppercut by Golovkin and Canelo lands a good body shot. Canelo with a jab to the body. Good right cross by Canelo. Golovkin with a good right cross. Golovkin with a lead left hook to the chin. Golovkin with a short hook to the temple. Golovkin is circling on the outside. Canelo barely misses with a wild hook. Golovkin lands two short jabs. Canelo lands a good jab from a distance. Canelo lands a good combination to the body of Golovkin. Canelo is swinging for the fences. Golovkin lands a good right cross to the body.

10-9 Canelo; 49-46 Canelo.

Round 6:

Canelo may have a cut near his eye. Golovkin lands a short up jab. Canelo lands a good left hook to the body and barely misses with a right cross. Canelo digs in a hook to the body of Golovkin. Canelo has a cut by his left eye. Good jab by Golovkin. Canelo snaps out two jabs. Golovkin lands a lead left hook. Good right cross to the temple by Golovkin. Golovkin lands a left hook and Canelo lands a vicious left hook. Golovkin lands a lead left hook followed by a right uppercut. They both land right crosses. Canelo with a good left hook to the body. Golovkin takes a good jab by Canelo. Golovkin looks like he is tiring. Canelo pressing forward. Golovkin lands a good short jab.

10-9 Canelo; 59-55 Canelo.

Round 7:

Canelo lands a short left hook and Golovkin lands a right cross. Canelo is pressing forward on Golovkin. Canelo lands two short uppercuts on Golovkin followed by a reaching left hook to the chin of Golovkin. Canelo digs in another right hook to Golovkin. Golovkin lands a good right hook and follows it with a left to the temple. Canelo throws and lands a hard left uppercut to the body. Golovkin lands a left hook to the temple and barely misses with a right cross. Canelo with a good, sharp right cross. They both land a good jab. Golovkin snaps out two good jabs. Canelo barley misses a whizzing straight right hand. Good lead left hook by Golovkin. Canelo lands a lead left hook upstairs. Golovkin lands a right cross and follows it with two jabs. They both land a jab at the same time. Golovkin lands a good three punch combination. Golovkin lands another jab as the round ends.

10-9 Golovkin; 68-65 Canelo

Round 8:

Golovkin throws out two quick jabs and lands a short lead left hook. Canelo lands two quick jabs and Golovkin lands a short uppercut. Good left hook to the body by Golovkin. Canelo lands a hard right uppercut followed by a good hook. Canelo lands two hard right hook to the head of Golovkin. Golovkin lands a left hook to the head and body. Golovkin is backing away from Canelo. Canelo lands a crisp right cross followed by a left to the body. Canelo lands a short uppercut to the body. Canelo is having a strong round. Golovkin lands a reaching right hook. Both guys look like they are tiring. Canelo lands a sharp right cross. Golovkin with a left hand to the chin. Both guys are showing they have strong chins. Canelo lands a left hook and Golovkin shakes his head no in response. Good short jab on Canelo by Golovkin. Canelo’s cut is getting worse and Golovkin lands a right cross as the round ends.

10-9 Canelo; 78-74 Canelo


Photo Credit: HBO Twitter Account
Round 9:

Canelo and Golovkin are exchanging immediately in the middle and both are landing. Golovkin though looks like he is getting the better of Canelo. Canelo with a hard-right hook ot the body. Golovkin lands a hard right to the chin of Canelo and Canelo lands one of his own. Canelo with a wicked uppercut. Canelo barely misses with two uppercuts. Golovkin lands a looping right hand. Canelo looks tired. Golovkin lands two short hooks. Golovkin with a short right uppercut followed by a right cross. Canelo digs in a hook to the body. Canelo with another digging hook to the body followed by a hard right to the chin of Golovkin. Golovkin lands a hard-left hook and both guys look exhausted. They both lands hooks. Golovkin looks a little fresher of the two.

10-9 Golovkin; 87-84 Canelo

Round 10:

Golovkin pressing forward now and flicks out three straight jabs. Canelo eats two short right uppercuts from Golovkin. Canelo lands a right uppercut right hook combination. Canelo gets the crowd on it’s feet with a combination. Golovkin lands a good right cross and Canelo lands a two punch combination. Golovkin with a hard stiff jab on Canelo. Good right hook by Golovkin. Golovkin lands a hard right cross and looks like he may have Canelo stunned. Canelo is firing back and lands a beautiful uppercut. Canelo digs in another hook to the body of Golovkin. Golovkin with a good left hook to the temple followed by a hard right cross. They both land a jab. Good right hook to the body of Canelo by Golovkin. Golovkin lands a left hook/jab combination. Golovkin lands a good right cross. Golovkin lands another good right cross. Great fight.

10-9 Golovkin; 96-94 Canelo.

Round 11:

Golovkin is coming forward on Canelo. Golovkin lands a right cross followed by a right uppercut. Golovkin snaps out two jabs and lands a right cross on Canelo. Golovkin is stalking Canelo. Canelo is circling away from Golovkin. Golovkin lands a good right cross followed by a left hook upstairs. Golovkin lands several good power shots on Canelo. Canelo lands three good shots on Golovkin and firing back. Canelo barely misses with a hard right cross. Golovkin lands a short right uppercut. Golovkin lands a little jab. Golovkin barely misses with a right cross. Canelo lands a good right hook. They tie up in the middle. Golovkin lands a good left hook that sends Canelo stumbling a little bit. Canelo with a good right uppercut to the body of Golovkin. Very close round.

10-9 Golovkin; 105-104 Canelo.

Round 12:

They tap gloves at the start of the round. Canelo lands a good right uppercut to the chin of Golovkin. Golovkin answers with a good combination of his own. Golovkin lands a hard right uppercut on Canelo. Canelo with a right cross on Golovkin. Canelo with a good three punch combination. Canelo slips on the mat. Canelo with a hard right uppercut to the body. They both look exhausted. Canelo lands a hard right cross . They are both landing and throwing an insane number of punches. Good short right uppercut by Golovkin. Canelo with a good left hook to the chin. Golovkin and Canelo exchanging, but Canelo looks to land the better shots. They both have thrown nothing but power shots. They both look exhausted. Canelo lands a short left hook on the cin of Golovkin. Golovkin lands a three punch combination on Canelo. Great fight.

10-9 Golovkin; 114-114 by Boxing Insider.

Many rounds were close and could have been scored either way.

The judges scored it 114-114, 115-113, and 115-113 for Canelo Alvarez by majority decision.

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Golovkin vs. Canelo Undercard Results: Clean Slate of Knockouts for Chocolatito, Lemieux, and Munguia


By: William Holmes

The T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada was the host site for tonight’s HBO Pay Per View Offering featuring a main event between Gennady Golovkin and Canelo Alvarez.

Three fights were show on the undercard, and the opening bout was between former champion Roman “Chocolatito” Gonzalez(46-2) and Moises Fuentes (25-5-1) in the super flyweight division.


Photo Credit: HBO Boxing Twitter Account

Fuentes looked like the taller and bigger fighter in the ring, but had to deal with Chocolatito’s jab and good head movement early on. Chocolatito was also able to land some decent left hooks to the body and outland Fuentes 22-6 in the opening round.

Chocolatito continued to rip hooks to the body and combinations in the second round and had Fuentes bleeding from his face as he walked to his corner.

Chocolatito continued to overwhelm Fuentes and had a solid up jab working in the fourth round. Fuentes was able to land a decent combination to the body in the fourth that momentarily slowed Chocolatito down, but he didn’t offer much more than that.

The end came in the fifth round when Chocolatito landed a short right hook to the chin of Fuentes with his back against the ropes, and he went crashing down and did not come close to getting up by the count of ten.

Roman Chocolatito Gonzalez wins by knockout at 1:44 of the fifth round.

The next bout of the night was between Gary “Spike” O’Sullivan (28-2) and David Lemieux (39-4) in the middleweight division.


Photo Credit:HBO Boxing Twitter Account

Lemieux outweighed O’Sullivan by about fifteen pounds by the time they stepped in the ring, and the difference in power showed early.

Lemieux was aggressive early and threw good hooks to the body and often tripled up on his jab. Lemieux applied heavy pressure and was landing strong shots, but did get momentarily stunned by an O’Sullivan jab.

Lemieux later responded with a resounding left hook that sent O’Sullivan spinning and crashing to the mat.

Lemieux wins by knockout at 2:44 of the first round.

The next bout of the night was between Jaime Munguia (30-0) and Brandon Cook (20-1) for the WBO Junior Middleweight Title.


Photo Credit: HBO Boxing Twitter Account

Munguia looked a weight class bigger than Cook and started off as the more aggressive fighter, landing combinations to the body and head early on. He was warned early for low blows, but continued to land heavy shots to the body and was pummeling him as the round came to an end.

Munguia took a right cross from Cook early in the second round, but retook control with a solid right uppercut followed by more blows to the body. He boxed more in control during the second round, but ended the round strong again with another barrage of punches.

Munguia opened up the third round with heavy digging hooks to the body, and knocked Cook down after a body head combination, including a punch that landed as Cook was falling to the mat.

Cook was able to get back up, but got obliterated with punches to the body that forced him to cover up. Cook was not fighting back and the referee jumped in to save him from further punishment.

Jaime Munguia wins by TKO at 1:03 of the third round.

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Canelo vs. Golovkin 2 Notebook: Official Weights, Betting Odds, Movie Theatre Info, and more…


Compiled By: William Holmes

The following is a special edition of the Boxing Insider Notebook; covering the comings and goings in the upcoming Canelo vs. Golovkin PPV Fight.


Photo Credit: Ed Mulholland/HBO

Official Weights for PPV Card
Canelo Alvarez (159.4 lbs) vs. Gennady Golovkin (159.6 lbs)
Jaime Munguia (154 lbs) vs. Brandon Cook (153.2 lbs)
David Lemieux (160 lbs) vs. Gary O’Sullivan (159.2 lbs)
Roman Gonzalez (114.8 lbs) vs. Moises Fuentes (116 lbs)
Vergil Ortiz Jr. (139.6 lbs) vs. Roberto Ortiz (139.8 lbs)
Alexis Rocha (148.4 lbs) vs. Carlos Ortiz (148 lbs)
Jaba Khositashvili (166.5 lbs) vs. Lawrence King (168.4 lbs)
Brian Ceballo (146.5 lbs) vs. David Thomas (146 lbs)

Abel Sanchez: Triple G Knocking Out Triple C Will Be a Public Service

T-Minus two days and counting until undefeated World Middleweight Champion and boxing’s superhero GENNADY “GGG” GOLOVKIN makes his 21st and division record-breaking title defense. It’s taken nearly one year but Golovkin will finally get the rematch he and the world have craved, against former two-division world champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez. And what a long strange trip it’s been to get here.

“Triple G vs. Triple C is finally here,” declared Abel Sanchez, Golovkin’s trainer. “Canelo Con Carne is finally going to face the music from the man he has avoided most, Gennady Golovkin. All those months of excuses, the aiding and abetting and the enabling by Canelo’s team, will finally come to an end on Saturday night. Gennady is boxing’s longest-reigning world champion (since 2010) but I don’t think he has really been appreciated until he stood up for the sport of boxing and boxing fans after Canelo flunked two random drug tests in February. Instead of being upfront and honest about it, Canelo and his team trotted out an old wheeze about the Mexican beef industry. Instead of apologizing to Gennady, Canelo and his team continued to dress themselves in clothes made of entitlement and arrogance. No, Saturday night’s rematch isn’t about revenge, it’s about respect. It’s about Gennady defending the heritage of a great sport and the honor of that sport’s great fans. It’s about fairness, where two athletes compete on an even playing field, adhering to the rules and shining a light when others try to circumvent their own regulations. Sunshine is a great disinfectant.”

“Gennady has trained hard for this fight. He has had a different edge in this training camp and has trained with a purpose,” continued Sanchez. “To win a fight you have to try to win the fight. You win a fight by doing damage to your opponent and making it a battle. Does Gennady want to knock out Canelo on Saturday night? You betcha and it will be a public service to the sport and the Mexican beef industry he has selfishly maligned.”

Heralded Prospect Brian Ceballo In Action This Saturday Night on the Canelo-GGG Card
Undefeated welterweight Brian Ceballo will be back in action on the biggest card of 2018 when he takes on David Thomas in a scheduled six-round bout at The T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

The bout will be part of the highly anticipated card that will be headlined by the Middleweight World Title rematch between Canelo Alvarez and Gannady Golovkin.

The Ceballo – Thomas bout is scheduled to be streamed live on Facebook.

The 24 year-old Ceballo of New York knows that this is a big opportunity when a lot of exposure to be showcased on this card.

“I’m very excited to be a part of a show of this this magnitude!,” said Ceballo. “I admire both of these fighters, and it’s a dream to be fighting on their undercard. I’m in the best shape of my life,” and the people who will be there will get to see the future of the welterweight of division.”

Ceballo’s co-manager, Tim VanNewhouse has high aspirations for Ceballo, and is looking forward to his fighter’s performance on the big stage.

“Brian’s has had a great start to his professional career. Adding him to the biggest show of the year is proof to that. Most prospects don’t get showcased on these platforms unless they are ready. I’m confident he’s going to impress, and continue to move up in the ranks.”

Ceballo is managed by Split-T Management and promoted by 360 Promotions.

Golovkin and Sanchez Working on Rereleasing a Classic

Fight Week is here. Finally. Undefeated WBC/WBA/IBO Middleweight World Champion Gennady “GGG” Golvkin will be looking to break a record everyone believed would remain untouched — the record he shares with the legendary Bernard Hopkins. On Saturday, Golovkin will attempt to make the 21st consecutive defense of the middleweight crown he has held since 2010, in a rematch against Lineal Middleweight World Champion Canelo Alvarez. How fitting that Golovkin will be going for the record-breaker against Alvarez inasmuch as the co-promoters of Alvarez, Hopkins and Oscar De La Hoya, will have front row seats to see it. Making it even more memorable, the Golovkin-Alvarez rematch will take place in the same city and on nearly the same date as the De La Hoya – Hopkins Middleweight World Championship fight which took place, on September 18, 2004.

“That was a defining fight for both Bernard and Oscar because of the way they fought and the way Bernard won. They both dared to be great,” said Abel Sanchez. “I reviewed the tape of that fight early in training camp and I saw how Bernard stopped Oscar dead in his tracks with a picture-perfect liver shot. I normally don’t like to give away our game plan but I don’t mind sharing this part of it, Gennady has trained and is prepared to do the same thing to Canelo. We have freshened it up and even gave it a name, The Ginger Snap. Personally, I think it would be poetic justice to break the record using the same type of punch that Bernard used on Oscar to unify the middleweight titles

“Saturday’s fight will define Gennady and Canelo. We are going to see if Canelo is coming to fight or coming to run, to survive, in hopes of receiving another gift from the judges,” continued Sanchez. “Gennady is ready to take the wind out of Canelo’s sails with that punch to the liver. Gennady doesn’t just fight Mexican Style, he fights like a Philadelphia fighter of old. Don’t be surprised if Gennady end things using a punch that is a throwback to those days — a classic liver shot — to puncture the Canelo myth once and for all. Bernard was the first fighter to stop Oscar and Gennady is looking to be the first one to stop Canelo

GGG Promises More Action in Rematch

While he wouldn’t comment whether or not the title fight versus Canelo Alvarez would go the distance in an exclusive interview with GetMoreSports.com, Gennady Golovkin said that there would be more emotion, drama and action.

Currently, BetDSI Sportsbook has Golovkin listed as a -160 favorite while Alvarez is a +130 underdog. The fight total is set at 11.5 rounds, with heavy juice (-235) on the over.

Golovkin trainer Abel Sanchez also gives his take on the fight, Donal Trump and more in a wide-ranging interview here.

Below are props for the WBA/IBF/WBC Middleweight Title Bout from BetDSI:

Fight Outcome

Alvarez to win by KO,TKO or DQ +700
Alvarez to win by Decision/Tech Decision +160
Golovkin to win by KO,TKO or DQ +200
Golovkin to win by Decision/Tech Decision +155
Draw or Technical Draw +1400

Round Betting

Alvarez to win in Round 1 +6500
Alvarez to win in Round 2 +4800
Alvarez to win in Round 3 +4800
Alvarez to win in Round 4 +3800
Alvarez to win in Round 5 +3800
Alvarez to win in Round 6 +3800
Alvarez to win in Round 7 +3800
Alvarez to win in Round 8 +3800
Alvarez to win in Round 9 +3800
Alvarez to win in Round 10 +4500
Alvarez to win in Round 11 +4500
Alvarez to win in Round 12 +6500
Alvarez to win by Decision/Tech Decision +160
Golovkin to win in Round 1 +3000
Golovkin to win in Round 2 +2500
Golovkin to win in Round 3 +2000
Golovkin to win in Round 4 +1800
Golovkin to win in Round 5 +1500
Golovkin to win in Round 6 +1500
Golovkin to win in Round 7 +1500
Golovkin to win in Round 8 +1600
Golovkin to win in Round 9 +1800
Golovkin to win in Round 10 +2000
Golovkin to win in Round 11 +2300
Golovkin to win in Round 12 +2500
Golovkin to win by Decision/Tech Decision +155
Draw or Technical Draw +1400

Canelo vs. GGG Coming to 450+ Movie Theatres

This Saturday, Sept. 15 — don’t miss the highly anticipated rematch of the yearLIVE on the big screen. The epic showdown between two of the most explosive, heavy-handed fighters in any division in the sport today, Canelo Alvarez andGennady Golovkin, will be broadcast LIVE from T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas to movie theaters nationwide – 8pm ET / 7pm CT / 6pm MT / 5pm PT. Tickets can be purchased online at www.fathomevents.com/events/canelo-vs-golovkin or at participating theater box offices.

Watch the event trailer here: https://youtu.be/Oax1yE1DlbY

In the co-main event, Jaime Munguia (30-0, 25 KOs) will make the second defense of his WBO Junior Middleweight World Title against contender Brandon “Bad Boy” Cook (20-1, 13 KOs) in a 12-round battle. Former IBF Middleweight World Champion David Lemieux (39-4, 33 KOs) and Gary “Spike” O’Sullivan (28-2, 20 KOs) of Cork, Ireland will go head-to-head in a 12-round middleweight battle. Former pound-for-pound king and former four-division world champion Roman “Chocolatito” Gonzalez (46-2, 38 KOs) will make his highly anticipated return against Moises “Moi” Fuentes (25-5-1, 14 KOs) in a 10-round super flyweight battle.

A complete list of theater locations, visit the Fathom Events website (theaters and participants are subject to change).

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Still No Face-Off For Canelo and GGG; Is the Face-Off More Important to the Fans than the Fighters?


By: Jeandra Lebeauf

On Friday afternoon, Canelo Alvarez and Gennady Golovkin meet for the final time ahead of Saturday night’s rematch to weigh-in and potentially face-off. Emphasis on “potentially” since that one element of the pre-fight build-up has been completely absent since the fight announcement.

How important is the face-off to the fighters themselves? Is it just an element for fans and hyping the fight? Or is it a legitimate part of the preparation ahead of fight night.

We asked a number of current fighters and trainers if the lack of face-offs in the promotion of Canelo vs. GGG rematch is helpful or detrimental to the promotion of the event and their overall mental preparation for the showdown. Here’s what they had to say.

Bernard Hopkins:

I always wanted to face-off with an opponent because I always had something to leave on his mind when he went back to his room. It was part of my strategy and also letting him know I’m in your head, I know I’m in your head and we gonna fight when we fight.

Ishe Smith:

It really doesn’t matter in my opinion. There’s a lot of bad blood there, I can’t blame GGG. He feels Canelo cheated.

Shakur Stevenson:

I really don’t know their reason for not doing but me personally, I don’t mind facing off at any given time honestly.

Chris Arreola:

It doesn’t matter, but in GGG eyes he’s waiting for when it’s a great time! He wants to see the fear in Canelo’s eyes. I consider GGG an “American psycho” or a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde split personality. He looks nice and wholesome, but he has a crazy killer inside him.

John Molina:

It really doesn’t matter because come Saturday, they’re going to fight.

Adrien Broner:

Why would I care? I don’t give a f**k about Golden Boy.

Shawn Porter:

Doesn’t matter. He’s been doing this far too long. Face-Off. Weigh-In. Press conference, none of that stuff is a big deal for a big-time athlete. Face-off is for the crowd.

Austin Trout:

I think it’s bad because if there is that much bad blood, then as far as fight pub goes there isn’t anything more golden! As a fighter, if I don’t like my opponent then I can’t wait to see him and make him uncomfortable.

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