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The Eleventh Annual Philly’s “The Briscoe Awards”


By: Ken Hissner

John DiSanto did his usual great event at the VBA Ring One this year instead of the Xfinity live in recent years thanks to the suggestion by Brittany “BAM” Rogers who is part of Peltz Boxing team.

The event had its usual mix of a crowd from the boxing world in attendance and eleven awards to match the years DiSanto has been doing this event.

It was a three hour of nostalgia and current boxing interests. The No. 15 IBF super welterweight Tyrone “Young Gun” Brunson, 26-6-2 (24), was the main man in the afternoon. He received the “Fighter of the Year (2017) Award scoring three big wins. Even though Boxing Director Greg Sirb hasn’t put out PA boxing rankings since the second quarter of 2015 on the PA website it hasn’t stopped promoters from having PA State title fights.

Brunson started the year off winning a split decision over Brandon Quarles, 18-3-1 (9), of Alexandria, VA, at the SugarHouse (no spaces) Casino in Philadelphia on March 11th.

On June 24th in what turned out to be the Briscoe “Fight of the Year” Brunson came off the canvas stopping former IBF Welterweight champion Kermit “Asesino” Cintron, 39-5-3 (30), of Reading, PA, in a war. Cintron had Brunson on the canvas twice in the fourth round but managed to get to the bell. In the fifth round Cintron came out to finish off Brunson but ended up on the canvas three times. Brunson with this victory won the vacant USA PA Super Welterweight Title.

On December 1st 2017 Brunson returned to the ring to pick up yet another belt in stopping Manny Woods, 16-6-1 (6), of St. Petersburg, FL, in the eighth round. All three opponents have not returned to the ring since their defeat.

Brunson picked up a third Briscoe Award for the “Performance of the Year” for his win over Cintron. Promoter of both Brunson and Cintron, Marshall Kauffman of Kings Promotion out of Reading, PA, has done well for Brunson and also in bringing Cintron back from inactivity.

Avery Sparrow, 9-1 (3), won both the “Breakout Fighter of the Year” and the “Prospect Fighter of the Year” posting four victories and gaining the No. 14 ranking in the WBO’s Super Featherweight division. He has put his career in good hands with IBHOF promoter J Russell Peltz of Peltz Boxing and it has really paid off.

Sparrow started 2017 with a win over fellow Philly fighter Anthony Burgin, 10-2 (2), on July 10th at the 2300 Arena in South Philly winning a split decision over eight rounds of boxing.

In Sparrow’s second fight of the year on June 27th he defeated Dominican southpaw Isaelin Florian, 6-0 (3), fighting out of Reading, PA, over six rounds at the Sands Bethlehem Event Center on Fox Sports 1. Both fighters found themselves on the canvas in the first round. Florian was dropped a second time in round two. Not to be denied he dropped Sparrow for a second time in round four.

This writer put out an article on Sparrow prior to the Briscoe Awards that went up on www.boxinginsider.com Monday entitled “Philly’s Avery Sparrow is a Return to Old Philly Boxing”. Peltz made a comment how Sparrow doesn’t ask “who or where he is fighting or for how much but follows the promoters lead” and it has paid off big time.

In Sparrow’s third fight of the year on September the 8th at the 2300 Arena he won a majority eight round decision over Joey Laviolette, 6-0 (3), of Nova Scotia, Canada. One judge gave Sparrow all eight rounds and another all but one round.

In Sparrow’s fourth fight of the year on November 30th at the MGM National Harbor in Oxon Hill, MD, he defeated world contender Jose “Wonder Boy” Lopez, 19-1-1 (14), of Carolina, Puerto Rico over ten rounds on ESPN2 to earn his world ranking.

Winning the “One to Watch Fighter of the Year” is none other than welterweight Jaron “Boots” Ennis, 18-0 (16), who before that won the “Amateur of the Year”, and before that the “Everett Brothers Award. Last year he won the “Rookie of the Year” Award.

Doing his promotion in attendance was Chris Middendorf of Victory Promotions who in just under two years has Ennis with eighteen fights. He is scheduled April 14th in Virginia for his next encounter. He is trained by his father “Bozy” Ennis who is this writer’s pick as the best trainer in Philly out of his gym “Bozy’s Dungeon” on Venango Street over the Harrowgate Gym off of Kensington Avenue.

Ennis went 9-0 with 8 knockouts in 2017 in such places as Norfolk, Virginia, Durham, North Carolina, Washington, DC, Hammond, Indiana, and Springfield, Virginia. His other four fights were all in South Philadelphia at the 2300 Arena. In the lone decision he won every round plus scoring a knockdown over James Winchester, 20-12, who hasn’t fought since their March 31st match.

The “Rookie of the Year” went to Dylan Price, 4-0 (4), a Super Flyweight former outstanding amateur for his posting of all four fights in 2017. In February he was in Wilson, NC, posting a first round stoppage. Then in April in Atlantic City he posted a third round stoppage. In June at the Sands Bethlehem Event Center he posted a first round knockout. He finished up the year in November at the Barclay Center in Brooklyn, NY, posting another first round stoppage on the undercard of WBC Heavyweight Champion Deontay “The Bronze Bomber” Wilder title defense.

Price is promoted by Mayweather Promotions with his father Dave Price and “Doc” Nowicki handling management and advisor.

The 2017 Amateur of the Year” went to Raymond Ford of the D-Boys Boxing team, of Sicklerville, New Jersey. The eighteen year old South Jersey boxer participated in three major tournaments and performed well all year long. In July, Ford defeated Californian Japheth-lee Llamido to win the Ringside Nationals – Mens Youth Open Division Championship at 123 pounds. He also won the Silver Medal at the USA Junior Olympics. In December, in Salt Lake City, Ford competed at the USA Boxing Nationals, Elite Division at 123 pounds. He is currently ranked No. 3 in the nation, in his weight class, and is a member of the USA International High Performance Team.

The 2017 “Knockout of the Year” award went to Marcel Rivers, 4-0 (3), out of the ABC Recreation Center at 26th & Masters in North Philly under the guidance of PAB HOF trainer Fred Jenkins, Sr. On September 8th at the 2300 Arena Rivers knocked out veteran boxer Osnel Charles, 11-17-1, of Atlantic City, New Jersey.

The “Everett Brothers Award” presented by Mike Everett went to Jerome Conquest, 9-3 (1), managed by James Gibbs who was by his side. The award is for to acknowledge the accomplishments, commitment and character of boxers working hard to make their way in the ring. The award is intended to encourage young fighters with the same dream the Everett’s once had – to become world champion.

The award also helps to remember and honor their brother, the late, great Tyrone Everett, one of Philly’s all-time best. The worst decision this writer ever witnessed and in person was Tyrone Everett losing to champion Alfredo Escalera in Philly. I had it 13-2 in rounds for Everett and he lost a split decision. The PA judge who voted for Escarlera never judged another fight. He was Lou Tress and he judged since 1931 some 291 bouts. The other judge Ismo Wiso Fernandez it was his first title match and did a total of 55.

In attendance Sunday were such boxing people as promoters J Russell Peltz, Chris Middendorf and Marshall Kauffman. Also, writers Jeff Jowett, Nigel Collins, Frank Bartolini, Richie Pagano, Marc Abrams (also publicist) and Matt Ward. Boxers like former IBF Junior Middleweight champion Buster Drayton, Kerry Judge, Manny Folly, Garrett Wilson, Simon Carr and Mike Everett along with all award recipients. Trainers “Bozy” Ennis, Greg Hackett. Boxing people like Michelle Rosado (with Peltz Boxing), “Doc” Nowicki, Dave Price, Dan Rossano, Fred Blumstein (Time Keeper), photographers Kenny Ludwig, Darryl Cobb, Jr., lawyer and sponsor Neil Gelb, Nicole Ross (President of Hands Across Philadelphia), referee’s Vic de Wysocki and Blair Talmadge. VBA officers President Charley Sgrillo and Secretary John Gallagher. VBA member’s Norman Torpey, Fred Druding and Joe Mathis. Steve Fleisher who is always on the boxing scene.

I know I have forgotten many in attendance. John DiSanto will have a story coming up on his event at www.phillyboxinghistory.com which is a great boxing site about Philadelphia boxing people.

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Philly’s Avery Sparrow is a Return to Old Philly Boxing


By: Ken Hissner

Philly’s Avery Sparrow puts all his trust in his promoter IBHOF promoter/matchmaker J Russell Peltz. He is currently No. 14 in the WBO ratings due to a victory over previous No. 5 Jose Lopez.

This is what Peltz had to say about his fighter when he was introduced first while fighting an opponent from Nogales, Mexico on the first pro show at Parx Casino in Bensalem, PA, on March 9th.

“When I mentioned this to Brittany Rogers who coordinated the smoothly run show, she remarked “since when did J Russell Peltz care about such things as who enters the ring first?” Never once did Sparrow mention it to me later that shows he has bought into the Peltz Boxing system for which we need a name. You’ve heard of the West Coast offense in football and the Triangle in basketball, but we need a name for the Peltz Boxing system. Something like, as Michelle Rosado coined last week: “If you want a tune-up, go to Midas!”

Avery Sparrow never said one word about being introduced first. He never moaned that he was making substantially less money for March 9th than he made for November 30th when he upset Jose Lopez, the No. 5 ranked WBO junior lightweight contender in the world, on ESPN. He never argued that Jesus Serrano, 17-4-2, was not exactly “a walk in the park type of opponent”. He never threatened to pull out when he was 8 pounds over the contract weight 48 hours before the weigh-in. He simply went out there and destroyed a credible opponent in less than 2 rounds to secure his rating with the WBO and hopefully open the eyes of the other ranking organizations.

I cannot sit here and tell you that Avery Marcus Sparrow will win the world title but I can tell you that after 49 years in this sometimes wonderful, sometimes rancid business of professional boxing, I am grateful that he believes in me as much as I believe in him. I’m not going to worry if, when the money comes in, that some moron on the street will fill his head with negative thoughts about me. That’s part of the business, but as I head to the top of the stretch of my career, I am enjoying the ride.

Sparrow is 10-1 (4) and turned 24 in January. He turned professional in July of 2014 winning his first 4 fight, 2 by stoppage, before losing for the only time in his career so far by DQ in the 6th and final round to Jerome Rodriguez, 6-3-3, in October of 2015. He came back in March of 2016 to score a first round knockout in Dubai Night Life in Charlotte, NC.

Sparrow didn’t fight again until March of 2017 when he was pitted against one time Philly prospect Anthony Burgin, 10-2, when he won an 8 round split decision. In June he was up in The Sands in Bethlehem, PA, defeating Isaelin Florian, 6-0, of the DR and Reading, PA. In September he was put in with another 6-0 boxer named Joey Laviolette from Nova Scotia, Canada who he defeated by majority decision in 8 rounds. Two months later he defeated Lopez, who was 19-1-1 (14), at the MGM National Harbor, in Oxon Hill, MD. This put him into the WBO Super Featherweight ratings.

In December of 2015 Peltz took Camden’s Jason Sosa who was 18-1-3, on a trip to a world championship. Sosa only had one 10 round bout prior to this. Sosa was pitted with Nicholas Walters the WBA World Super Featherweight champion who Sosa drew with in a non-title bout. In his next fight in June of 2016 Sosa defeated Javier Fortuna in Beijing, China, for the world title that Walters had given up.

Will Peltz lead Avery Sparrow to a world super featherweight title the same way? Only time will tell!

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Philly’s Avery Sparrow is a Return to Old Philly Boxing


By: Ken Hissner

Philly’s Avery Sparrow puts all his trust in his promoter IBHOF promoter/matchmaker J Russell Peltz. He is currently No. 14 in the WBO ratings due to a victory over previous No. 5 Jose Lopez.


Photo Credit: Kenny Ludwig

This is what Peltz had to say about his fighter when he was introduced first while fighting an opponent from Nogales, Mexico on the first pro show at Parx Casino in Bensalem, PA, on March 9th.

“When I mentioned this to Brittany Rogers who coordinated the smoothly run show, she remarked “since when did J Russell Peltz care about such things as who enters the ring first?” Never once did Sparrow mention it to me later that shows he has bought into the Peltz Boxing system for which we need a name. You’ve heard of the West Coast offense in football and the Triangle in basketball, but we need a name for the Peltz Boxing system. Something like, as Michelle Rosado coined last week: “If you want a tune-up, go to Midas!”

Avery Sparrow never said one word about being introduced first. He never moaned that he was making substantially less money for March 9th than he made for November 30th when he upset Jose Lopez, the No. 5 ranked WBO junior lightweight contender in the world, on ESPN. He never argued that Jesus Serrano, 17-4-2, was not exactly “a walk in the park type of opponent”. He never threatened to pull out when he was 8 pounds over the contract weight 48 hours before the weigh-in. He simply went out there and destroyed a credible opponent in less than 2 rounds to secure his rating with the WBO and hopefully open the eyes of the other ranking organizations.

I cannot sit here and tell you that Avery Marcu Sparrow will win the world title but I can tell you that after 49 years in this sometimes wonderful, sometimes rancid business of professional boxing, I am grateful that he believes in me as much as I believe in him. I’m not going to worry if, when the money comes in, that some moron on the street will fill his head with negative thoughts about me. That’s part of the business, but as I head to the top of the stretch of my career, I am enjoying the ride.

Sparrow is 10-1 (4) and turned 24 in January. He turned professional in July of 2014 winning his first 4 fight, 2 by stoppage, before losing for the only time in his career so far by DQ in the 6th and final round to Jerome Rodriguez, 6-3-3, in October of 2015. He came back in March of 2016 to score a first round knockout in Dubai Night Life in Charlotte, NC.
Sparrow didn’t fight again until March of 2017 when he was pitted against one time Philly prospect Anthony Burgin, 10-2, when he won an 8 round split decision. In June he was up in The Sands in Bethlehem, PA, defeating Isaelin Florian, 6-0, of the DR and Reading, PA. In September he was put in with another 6-0 boxer named Joey Laviolette from Nova Scotia, Canada who he defeated by majority decision in 8 rounds. Two months later he defeated Lopez, who was 19-1-1 (14), at the MGM National Harbor, in Oxon Hill, MD. This put him into the WBO Super Featherweight ratings.

In December of 2015 Peltz took Camden’s Jason Sosa who was 18-1-3, on a trip to a world championship. Sosa only had one 10 round bout prior to this. Sosa was pitted with Nicholas Walters the WBA World Super Featherweight champion who Sosa drew with in a non-title bout. In his next fight in June of 2016 Sosa defeated Javier Fortuna in Beijing, China, for the world title that Walters had given up.

Will Peltz lead Avery Sparrow to a world super featherweight title the same way? Only time will tell!

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Philly’s Jaron “Boots” Ennis is the “Can’t Miss Kid” at 147


By: Ken Hissner

This writer has proclaimed Philly’s Jaron “Boots” Ennis as the best looking prospect in Philly since 1984 Olympic Gold Medalist Meldrick Taylor. His next fight is scheduled for August 12th at the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C. which will be his first 8 rounder. Promotion is Nations Fight Night with Chris Middendorf doing the matchmaking. He also has promoted several of Ennis’ bouts under the name Victory Promotions. Ennis will face Mexican Ricardo Cano, 17-3-2. The show will benefit the Midtown Youth Academy and honoring Lamont & Anthony Peterson.

Ennis was the National Golden Gloves Champion in 2015. At the 2016 Olympic Trials he defeated Gary Antuanne Russell but in the box-offs lost to him twice.

“Boots beat Russell then lost to him with both fair decisions. Then in their third bout Boots got robbed,” said Bozy Ennis.
Ennis has a 13-0 (11) record in 15 months of activity with his last bout “a keep busy fight” at the Durham Armory in Durham, NC, defeating Robert Hill, 6-32-1 who couldn’t come out after three rounds.

His last bout in his hometown was June 2nd at the 2300 Arena in South Philly stopping Wilfredo Acuna, 16-20 (12), of Managua, NIC, at 2:53 of the first round in a scheduled 6.

Ennis in his previous 3 fights prior to his last fight has fought very experienced opponents in Elvin Perez, 28-16-4 KO1, James Winchester, 20-12, W6, Eduardo Flores, 25-26-3 WTKO4 and Acuna 16-20.

Ennis comes from a fighting family with brother Derek “Pooh” Ennis, 24-5-1 having won the USBA Super Welterweight title.

“He is going great and getting moved right. He is a boxer puncher,” said Pooh. “Boots” other brother Farah was 22-2 and won the NABF super middleweight title.

“Boots is definitely a champ in the making! I told his father “Bozy” that when he was still just a young kid. He has great foot work, hand speed and power along with a real disciplined work ethic. His dad is bringing him along the write way! One of the best talents in Philly along with Christian Carto (10-0 10 ko’s),” said Joey Eye (one of the top cut men in the business).

“Jaron Ennis is by far the most talented fighter in the welterweight division. He is a rare combination of speed, power, skills and boxing acumen. Again Cameron Dunkin has signed one of the best fighters in boxing. It is axiomatic that Ennis wins a world title by the end of 2019,” said George Hanson (writer and former amateur boxer).

“Boots” works out regularly with one of the top welterweights in the world in southpaw the “New” Ray Robinson, 23-2, who is also trained by “Bozy” Ennis in Bozy’s Dungeon in North Philly. “Boots is like my little brother. He surprises me with his work ethic because he is so young. He has a ton of talent and will be world champ,” said Robinson.

“It’s exciting watching Jaron Ennis fight, even at this early stage, because when you see him in action, you get the sense that he can truly be one of the great ones,” said John DiSanto (Philly Boxing History and Fight News).

“Boots” is one of the most relaxed boxers one would want to see. He fights both orthodox and southpaw and doesn’t miss a beat. It seems like he is very much “at home in the ring!” His trainer/father is one of the best if not the best trainer in Philly.

This writer was able to sit down and ask “Boots” and his father/trainer “Bozy” some questions.

KEN HISSNER: You had a very good amateur background. Was your decision to turn pro and easy one at the time you did?

BOOTS ENNIS: It was a very easy decision to make.

KEN HISSNER: You followed you’re two brothers “Pooh” and Farrah into the pro ranks. Have they had an influence on your fighting as a professional?

BOOTS ENNIS: They had a big influence in my boxing career and my life. They told me what to do and not what to do.

KEN HISSNER: Have you found it much different in training “Boots” compared to training his two brothers?

BOZY ENNIS: Not at all.

KEN HISSNER: Just a little over 15 months as a professional and it seems you are already having a problem keeping the original opponent named. Does it get frustrating when the opponent’s change when you are close to fight time?

BOOTS ENNIS: Sometimes but I’m always in the gym so it usually doesn’t bother me.

KEN HISSNER: “Boots” has fought 7 of his 13 fights in Philly plus 1 in Bristol which is nearby. Do you find it easier training at your gym right up until fight time rather than leaving earlier fighting in places he has like Utah, Virginia, New Mexico, and North Carolina?

BOZY ENNIS: Yes, it’s much easier and better.
KEN HISSNER: You have fought seven 6 round bouts and six 4 round bouts. Your next fight will be your first at 8 rounds. In spite of having 13 bouts only 2 have gone the distance. One 4 rounds and the other 6 rounds. One of your stoppages was in the 6th round. Are you eager to get up to an 8 round bout at this time?

BOOTS ENNIS: I can’t wait. It will give me more time to break my opponent down.

KEN HISSNER: Has the manager Cameron Dunkin been at many of your son’s fights being he is out of Nevada?

BOZY ENNIS: A couple of fights out west.

KEN HISSNER: Since you fight both orthodox and southpaw does sparring with southpaw “The New” Ray Robinson who you’re dad also trains help you boxing southpaw?

BOOTS ENNIS: Yes, Ray has been a big help being southpaw, but I fight my opponent the same either way.

KEN HISSNER: Who usually works the corner with you?

BOZY ENNIS: Shaun Lewis and Lawrence Smalls.

KEN HISSNER: I want to thank both of you for always being available. It’s always a pleasure coming down to “Bozy’s Dungeon.

BOOTS & BOZY ENNIS: No, thank you. You have always been there for us and a real straight shooter.

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Philly’s Damon “No Smilin” Allen, Jr.,Remains Unbeaten


Philly’s Damon “No Smilin” Allen, Jr.,Remains Unbeaten
By: Ken Hissner

The great grandson of legendary Philly trainer Mitch Allen is Philly’s “No Smilin” Damon Allen, 12-0-1 (5), remained unbeaten on June 30th at Fantasy Springs Casino, Indio, CA, winning a split decision over veteran Gamaliel “El Clatano” Diaz, 40-17-3 (19), of MEX.

Allen is trained by his father Damon “Big Dame” Allen, Sr. and out of his great grandfather’s Mitch Allen Gym at the Recreation Center at 57th& Haverford in West Philadelphia. ”My great grandfather taught me everything. I feel my style is old school,” said Allen.

When Allen was a senior at Communications Technology High, he won the boy’s 15-16 open division in the 125-pound class at the Ringside World Championships in Kansas City, Mo., for the second year in a row. He was then trained by his 81 year old (now 87?) great-grandfather Mitch Allen. He also won Gold in the 15-16 division at the Junior Golden Gloves Nationals.

“Bernard Hopkins, Matthew Saad Muhammad, “Sugar” Ray Leonard and David Reid were my favorite Philly boxers growing up,” said Allen. In 2006 he was at Northern Michigan University for two years along with Jesse Hart with both trained by Philly’s Al Mitchell and that was the last time he saw David Reid.

“In Camden, NJ, working with some bad kids it means a lot giving back. I know firsthand being my parents adopted my little cousin whose mother was on drugs and has been boxing since he was 8 and won the Silver Gloves at 9,” said Allen.

“My cousin lives in L.A. and is a limo driver who was talking to Mike Tyson about me and had him call me talking boxing. It really propelled me to win my next fight,” said Allen.

After a brilliant amateur career the 24 year old lightweight now with Golden Boy Promotions is in his sixth straight fight since fighting in his home city of Philadelphia in his fourth bout in California in his last six fights.

“I always found it so befitting that he was signed by Golden Boy Promotions, because he truly is the ‘Golden Boy’ of our city – Philadelphia. Damon “No Smilin” Allen or “Baby Dame” to those who are close to him – is a special fighter, and there’s really no way to describe him. I’ve known Dame for many years, trained alongside him, sparred countless rounds with him and learned so much from him. As a kid he was considered a phenom, but now as a man he has really taken his game to a whole another level, and a world title will soon be in his possession. Damon Allen is a great fighter, anyone who witnesses him fight can attest to that. However, his friends and family know that he’s a great person also, and I can attest to that,” said Naim Nelson (former PA lightweight champion).

Allen’s otherwise unblemished record was held to a draw in October of 2016 against veteran Luis Areceo, 28-15-4. In viewing this bout on www.youtube.com it was a close fight and I though 5-3 Allen. His career started back in April of 2013.

Allen turned professional in April of 2013 stopping Joseph Ahaamid at Harrah’s Philadelphia, in Chester, PA. He would follow up with a pair of decision wins at the Valley Forge Casino, in Valley Forge, PA. In September he defeated Tony Walker, 5-2-1, at Bally’s in Atlantic City.

In 2014 Allen won a pair of fights at the PA Metal Sheet Workers Hall in Philadelphia. Then a contract dispute caused him not to fight for fifteen months returning to the ring in 2015 with a pair of wins in Philadelphia and his debut in L.A.

In 2016 Allen defeated Daniel Perales, 9-4-1, in DC and Daniel Montoya, 10-3, in Hollywood. In October came his draw with Arceo in L.A. In 2017 he stopped Adam Mate, 24-10, at the Turning Stone Resort in Verona, NY.

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One Eye & a Bag of Tricks That Was Philly’s “Gypsy” Joe Harris


One Eye & a Bag of Tricks That Was Philly’s “Gypsy” Joe Harris
By: Ken Hissner

In the 60’s the baddest gym in Philadelphia was the 23rd PAL on Colombia Avenue. Such boxers as “Bad” Bennie Briscoe, “Cyclone” Hart, “Sugar” Hart, “Classy” Al Massey, Jimmy Young, “Boogaloo” Watts, “Smokin” Joe Frazier and the one-eyed “Gypsy” Joe Harris trained there.

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“I came to the 23rd PAL from the 39th PAL and was one of the few boxers. The others there liked to go to war. One day in order to see whowas the baddest guy in the gym insteps none other than “Bad” Bennie Briscoe and “Gypsy” Joe Harris into the ring. There was no referee or trainers involved. It was only for about a one when police officer Duke Dugent who ran the gym with an iron hand jumped in the ring pulling the two of them apart! Duke yelled at the two and said NEVER AGAIN! You’ve heard of Philly Gym Wars?

This was best of the best,” said Al Massey.

Briscoe was the AAU 147 champion and had a jab coming up from the floor like a sledge hammer always coming forward. Harris on the other hand was as slippery as you could get using angles (due to the eye) with arms wrapped around himself and weaving around hard to hit.

“He don’t make plans because he don’t know what he going to do until he do it,” said Willie Reddish (trainer). Born in Camden, NJ, word is Harris was “bag snatching” on Halloween and got hit in the right eye with a brick! He was a jokester so when he took eye exams he joked and got by them.

I was there the night Harris was fighting “Irish” Bobby Cassidy, a southpaw, who was holding Harris with his right hand on Harris’ left shoulder and he still couldn’t hit him! He had a bald head and could slip punch after punch.

Harris’ biggest win was over then welterweight champion Curtis Cokes in a non-title fight at Madison Square Garden in New York City. He would be asked afterwards “where’s the party?” He replied “ain’t no party here man, I’m from Philly!”

Today Cokes would have been stripped of his title for he was “nowhere to be found” when Harris showed up in Dallas for the rematch this time for the title! There was no ring in the hotel lobby and Cokes was “out fishing” per the local newspaper with picture in a row boat! Harris would move up to middleweight never to get close to a title fight again.

Harris turned professional in November of 1964 in Worcester, MASS, stopping Fred Walker in 3 rounds. In 1965 he went 9-0. In 1966 he defeated C.L. Lewis over 6 rounds in a bout filled with bad blood between the two of them. In May of 1966 he took on fellow Philly fighter Johnny Knight, 14-4-1 improving to 13-0 with the last 12 fights all in Philadelphia.

In October of 1966 Harris took on fellow Philadelphian Stanley “Kitten” Hayward, 22-2-1, stopping him in 6 rounds though coming off the floor in the third round. Next up was Cuban Jose Stable, 27-8-2, defeating Sidney “Sweet Pea” Adams and C.L. Lewis in NY. Then he defeated Cokes, Philly’s Charley Scott and Hayward in NY before coming to Philly to defeat Dick Turner, 19-0-1. In 1965 he lost in a title fight to Emile Griffith before returning to Philly losing to Percy Manning. He would lose to Harris in 1966.

Harris would go onto stop Knight in a rematch in 1967. Then he had the non-title win over Cokes weighing 151 improving to 18-0 at MSG before returning to Philly weighing 160 defeating Teddy Wright, 46-15-10.He would return to Dallas in the co-feature to Cokes defending against France’s Francois Pavilla. Harris posted a win but was at 158 ½ while 3 months later down to 152 in a war against Miguel Barreto, 15-1, winning a close one. Then coming off the canvas in the ninth to defeat Cassidy and win a rematch with Barreto. In February of 1968 he beat Dick DiVeronica, 38-8, just 6 months to his career ending fight against former world champion Emile Griffith, 55-9 in Philly.

Just before the Griffith fight Harris would marry a bar maid in Atlantic City and disappear showing up at the 23rd PAL Gym. “I only had a week to get him back in shape for Griffith,” said Duke Dugent (ran the gym). He was up to 160 losing to Griffith over 12 rounds. His offense was not there but his defense was. His 24 bout win streak was stopped. This fight set an indoor attendance record in Philly.

Getting back into the ring with Manny Gonsalves was to be his comeback fight when it was finally discovered at the examination he had no sight in an eye. The charade and career for Harris was over. It was blamed on a gym war with C.L. Lewis who thumbed him and Harris hit him in return in the “family jewels!” With a blood filled eye it brought the attention of the physician.

This writer made an attempt to get Harris to either Puerto Rico or Canada where he would possibly be able to fight. I was with him at the 23rd PAL with Dugent and we went to his family doctor to get the records to prove he had been blind fighting for some time but the doctor was not there. I never saw Harris again and he never fought again! Harris was one of the most “colorful” boxers out of Philadelphia in their history! He was only 22 and lived another 22 years before dying from a heart ailment at age 44! He is still talked about in Philly gyms this day.

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Lundy Wins and Ennis Stays unbeaten at 12-0 in Philly Friday!


Lundy Wins and Ennis Stays unbeaten at 12-0 in Philly Friday!
By: Ken Hissner

Peltz Boxing, BAM Boxing and RAGING BABE returned once again to the 2300 Arena in South Philly with veteran “Hammerin” Hank Lundy’s return to Philly for the first time since 2010. Top Philly prospect Jaron “Boots” Ennis increased his unbeaten win streak to 12.

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In the main event Lightweight “Hammerin” Hank Lundy, 28-6-1 (14), of Philly, scored a knockdown and stopped late substitute Dany Evangelista, 20-8-2 (16), of Mexico City, at 2:53 of the fifth round in a scheduled 8.

Lundy easily won the first two rounds ending the last part of the second round switching to southpaw. In the third round Lundy landed a solid left hook to the head of Evangelista stunning him.

Evangelista landed his best punch so far in the fight a right to the midsection of Lundy and repeated it at the bell. In the fourth round while in close Lundy landed a double left hook to the head of Evangelista.

In the fifth round Evangelista landed a solid lead right to the head of Lundy.

Lundy looked angry from that and came back with a flurry of punches dropping Evengelista and causing a cut over his left eye. He got up but didn’t respond when referee Gary Rosato asked him to raise his hands so he stopped it.

In co-feature super welterweight Native American Mark Daniels, Jr., of Crandon, WI, 3-1 (1), suffered his first loss when Isaiah Wise, 5-1 (3), of Philly, used a good body attack for all 6 rounds to take the decision.

In the opening round Daniels had his way halfway thru until Wise landed several good body shots with left hooks. In the second and third rounds Daniels switched back and forth southpaw to orthodox but it didn’t matter to Wise who continued going to the body.

In the fourth round Wise landed a solid lead right to the chin of Daniels that stunned him. Daniels came back causing a small cut over the right eye of Wise. In the fifth round Daniels got in his best punch of the fight a left hook to the chin of Wise who came right back with a combination to the body of Daniels. In the sixth and final round Wise continued with a body beating.

Judge’s Poturaj and Lundy had it 59-55 while Kinney had it 60-54 as did this writer. Referee was Rosato.

Top Philly welterweight prospect Jaron “Boots” Ennis, 12-0 (10), scored his twelfth straight win in fourteen months stopping Wilfredo “El Zurdo” Acuna, 16-21 (12), of Managua, NIC, with a pair of knockdowns at 1:23 in the first round.

In the opening round Ennis switched from orthodox to southpaw against the southpaw Acuna and dropped him with a right hook to the chin. Acuna got up and was dropped by a vicious right to the mid-section and counted out by referee Talmadge.

“I always come out orthodox but switched to southpaw and will be back June 17th in Baltimore (per Victory Promotions Chris Middendorf),” said Ennis. In his corner as usual was his father/trainer “Bozy” Ennis. Middendorf and manager Cameron Dunkin have done a fine job keeping Ennis who will turn 20 this month busy.

In the walk out bout cruiserweight Alvin “Iron Majik” Varmall, Jr., 11-0-1 (9), of Catskill, NY, with a pair of knockdowns destroyed Juan Reyna, 6-7-1 (2), of Brownsville, TX, at 2:02 of the first round.

In the opening round Varmall came storming out with solid body work chasing Reyna. An overhand right near the back of the head by Varmall dropped Reyna. A vicious body attack and down went Reyna forcing referee Blair Talmadge to wave it off.

Super lightweight Scott Kelleher, 5-1 (3), of Philly, back from a 13 month layoff was dropped 3 times losing to Dion “Showtime” Richardson, 2-1 (1), of Newark, NJ, at 2:19 of the first round.

In the opening round a right hand from Richardson almost put Kelleher through the ropes causing a knockdown by referee Rosato. Shortly later another right hand dropped Keller down. Before the end of the round Richardson had Kelleher all bloody and down for a third time as referee Rosato waved it off. It was reported Kelleher suffered a broken nose.

In a good featherweight scrap Crystian Peguero, 2-0 (1), of Philly, scored a hard fought decision over Saquan “Roto Rooter” Felton, 0-2 (0), of Rochester, NY, over 4 rounds.

In a close first round Peguero came out looking for another early knockout as he did in his debut but Felton was having none of it. In the second round things heated up with both boxers landing well and sometimes landing at the same time to the chin. In the third round a short right by Peguero to the chin of Felton had him holding on. In the fourth and last round both let it all hang out with the shorter Peguero scoring well but not well enough for a knockdown or knockout.
Judge Lundy had it 39-37 while Poturaj and Kinney along with this writer had it 40-36 for the winner.

In the opening bout super welterweight Ishmael Altman, 0-0-1 (0), of Arapahoe, NC, got the short end of the stick drawing with Tyree Crowder, 0-0-1 (0), of Philly, that ended in a disputed draw over 4 rounds.

In the first two rounds it was all Altman being taller and using his reach chasing Crowder. In the third round Altman continues using his jab with Crowder countering. In the fourth and final round Altman seemed to post a shutout. Referee was Rosato.

Judges Lundy, Poturaj and Frisca all had it 38-38. This writer 40-36.

In a rematch Marko Bailey, 5-0 (3), of Durham NC, won by majority decision over southpaw Vinnie Denierio, 1-2 (1), of Geneva, NY, over 4 good rounds of boxing.

In the first round it was Denierio controlling with a jab and an occasional straight left to the chin of Bailey who was chasing him. In the second round Bailey got a couple of right’s to the head in but Denierio outworked him. In the third round Bailey knowing he may be behind in the scoring aggressively went after Denierio. In the fourth and final round it was all Bailey halfway through the round when both exchanged uppercuts to the chin. Bailey seemed to earn a draw taking this round.

Judges Kinney and Poturaj had it 39-37 while Frisca and this writer 38-38. Referee was Rosato.

Welterweight Marcel Rivers, 2-0 (1), of Philly, scored a knockdown in winning a decision over Jamaal “Shoota” Gregory, 1-0 (1), of Charlotte, NC, over a spirited 4 rounds.

In the opening round both boxers mixed it up well. In the second round Rivers knocked the mouthpiece of Gregory out twice. Gregory did get the last punch in at the bell. In the third round an overhand right from Rivers to the chin of Gregory dropped him. Gregory got up and fought back to a stand still with Rivers.

In the fourth and final round the taller Gregory came back in the best round of the fight to take the round. Referee was Blair Talmadge.

All 3 judges and this writer had it 39-36 for the winner.

In attendance were former Philly world champions “Joltin” Jeff Chandler and Bernard “Be-Hop” Hopkins. It was a sell-out crowd!

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“Hammering” Hank Lundy & Jaron “Boots” Ennis in Philly Friday!


“Hammering” Hank Lundy & Jaron “Boots” Ennis in Philly Friday!
By: Ken Hissner

Lightweight “Hammering” Hank Lundy, 27-6-1 (13), returns to Philadelphia for the first time since 2009. Also on the card is Philly’s welterweight Jaron “Boots” Ennis, 11-0 (9), the best looking prospect in Philadelphia since 1984 Olympian Meldrick Taylor. Peltz Boxing, BAM Boxing and now Raging Babe continue to bring the fans competitive bouts.

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Peltz is an IBHOF promoter and matchmaker. Brittany Rogers is one of the youngest promoter-matchmakers in the country and though in her 20’s knows her boxing especially learning from Peltz who goes back to 1969 when he promoted his first show.

There was a press conference Wednesday night at the Xfinity Center in South Philadelphia. There are eleven bouts scheduled but by fight night Friday several will probably be cut out. Boxing Director Greg Sirb gets quite upset when there are more than seven bouts. Raging Babe speaks Spanish and was able to speak to the main event opponent of Lundy in Danny Evangelista, Jr., 20-7-2 (16), from Mexico City in a scheduled 8 round bout.

Lundy is quite outspoken and though failed in a title fight with unbeaten Terrance Crawford at 140 proclaims he will be the 135 champ. He has lost 3 of his last 5 fights and was backed by his promoter from CES Promotions out of Rhode Island telling all in attendance about Lundy fighting Crawford with an injury.

When boxers return to their home base Peltz said in so many words they are at the end of their career. Lundy is 33 and in his eleventh year of boxing. He has returned to his trainer “Cornbread” Ramey who is one of the most respected trainers in Philadelphia.

On the other hand Ennis is trained by his father “Bozy” Ennis who may be the best or one of the best trainers in the city and runs “Bozy’s Dungeon” in the Kensington section of Philadelphia. His son has won all 11 fights in but his fourteenth month since turning professional in April of 2016 under manager Cameron Dunkin. Dunkin chose Chris Middendorf’s Victory Promotions instead of Top Rank who are one and have been one of the best promotional groups in the country for years. Middendorf promoted a pair of shows in Philadelphia and hopefully won’t be returning after the mismatches he put on. Ennis has fought 6 of his 11 fights in Philadelphia and another in close by Bristol, PA. His bout is against Wilfredo “EllZurdo” Acuna, 16-20 (12), of Mauagua, NIC, scheduled for 6 rounds.

Also on hand were super welterweight Mark Daniels, Jr., 3-0 (1), a Native American from Crandon, WI, who as Peltz said was “not hesitant to come to Philadelphia to fight a Philadelphian in Isaiah Wise, 4-1 (3), who is a tough opponent and that’s the way Peltz does his matchmaking putting on competitive fights. This is for 6 rounds.

Well known trainer Don Turner now having a camp in Arapahoe, NC, is from the Philadelphia and brings in a pair of boxers to debut here knowing this area will develop out of town boxers as it did in “Marvelous” Marvin Hagler and Eddie Mustapha Muhammad. He has brought with him super welterweight Ishmael Altman who will face Philadelphia’s Tyree Crowder also in his debut. The other from NC is southpaw Heriberto Polanco who will fight Brooklyn’s Omar Kabary Salem, both in their debuts.

In a welterweight bout two out of state boxers face each other in a 6 round bout in Juan Reyna, 6-6-1 (2), of Brownsville, TX, against Alvin “Iron Majik” Varmall, Jr., 10-0-1 (8), of Catskill, NY. Philadelphia’s prospect Scott Kelleher, 5-0 (3), is returning to action after 13 months and will meet Dion Richardson, 1-1 (1), of Newark, NJ. Another prospect from Philadelphia is Crystian Peguero, 1-0 (1), who made his debut in March. He will meet Saquan Felton, 0-1, from Rochester, NY. Peltz said “I’m bringing a match between lightweight Marko Bailey, 4-0 (3), of Durham, NC, and Vinnie Denierio, 1-1 (10) of Geneva, NY, who I was told was a barnburner in their recent meeting.

Peltz doesn’t always care if the boxers are from the city if he knows they will give the fans something to cheer about.
Philadelphia’s super lightweight Nahir Albright, 1-1 (0), will meet debuting Sultan Zamir Uulu, of KYR now living in Philadelphia. Finally Philadelphia’s welterweight Marcel Rivers, 1-0 (1), meets Jamaal Gregory, 1-0 (1), of Charlotte, NC.

First bout is at 7:30PM and you know a Peltz show always starts on time. It is at the 2300 Arena at 2300 S. Swanson St. at the Front and Oregon area. Peltz said the event is already sold out.

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Jaron “Boots” Ennis Wins Eleventh Straight in Thirteen Months!


Jaron “Boots” Ennis Wins Eleventh Straight in Thirteen Months!
By: Ken Hissner

Philadelphia’s best prospect since Meldrick Taylor who was the 1984 Olympic Gold Medalist, Jaron “Boots” Ennis, 11-0 (9), won his 11th fight in 13 months of boxing. He comes from a fighting family with brothers Farah who was 22-2 and held the NABF super middleweight title and Derek “Pooh” Ennis, 24-5-1, who held the USBA super welterweight title.

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“Boots” father Derrick “Bozy” Ennis was 4-1 over six years. He decided to become a trainer for his own sons and other boxers like Anthony “The Messenger” Thompson, 24-3. He works with Angel Pizarro, Sr. for the younger of his two sons 17 year-old Branden “The Gift” Pizarro 5-0 in 7 months. The youngest Ennis is 19 and was a great amateur being the 2016 Olympic alternate splitting with Gary Russell’s brother before losing a controversial box off fight in their third bout to make the team.

“Boots” decided to turn professional in April of 2016 in of all places St. George, Utah. In May he made his Philadelphia debut. In June he was in Springfield, VA. That was three fights all ending in the first round! In July he was in Rio Rancho, New Mexico scoring a stoppage in the fourth and final round. In August he was in Bristol, PA, just outside of Philadelphia scoring a second round knockout. In September he was back in Philadelphia winning his first decision which was over four rounds. He would return in November in South Philadelphia in his first six round bout stopping Chris Alexander, 4-2 in the 4th round. In December another fight in Philadelphia stopping a stubborn Marcus Beckford, 3-4-3, who was determined to go the full 6 rounds but was stopped in the 6th and final round.

“Boots’ would open 2017 in January knocking out veteran Elvin Perez, 26-16-4 in 0:35 of the 1st round back in Philadelphia. In March he was up against one rough and dirty veteran in James Winchester, 20-12, who managed to go the full 6 rounds. Earlier in the bout a frustrated Winchester body slammed “Boots” and punched him in the face while he was on his back. The referee not only didn’t DQ him but never took away a point. Winchester would have been fortunate if he was DQ’d. “Boots” got up and put on a body attack that would make Mike “The Body Snatcher” McCallum proud. “Boots” also cut his opponent winning every round.

In “Boots” last fight on May 13th he would travel back to Virginia, Norfolk this time taking on another tough veteran in Eduardo Flores, 25-26-3. In checking the record of the opponents Flores was in with and their records it’s like a who’s who! He went the distance twice with David Zegarra when he was 10-0 and 24-0 over 10 rounds. He went the 10 round distance with former WBC champion Carlos Baldimor, 46-13-6. Then there was Ebenezer Lamptey, 14-0, over 12 rounds.

Kamat Islam 11-0, losing a 9 round decision. Franklin Mamani, 10-1-1, over 12 rounds. Diego Chaves, 18-0, being stopped in 9 rounds. Erick Bone, 9-0, in another 9 round decision. Australian Wale Omotoso, 23-1, in the 8th round.

Contender Brad Solomon, 23-0, over 8 rounds. Khiary Gray, 11-0, over 10 rounds. Sammy Valentin, 11-0, over 6 rounds. Skender Halil, 13-1 over 6 rounds. Former IBF welter champion Kermit Cintron, 35-5-2, over 6 rounds. Achour Esbo, 13-0, over 6 rounds. Anthony “Juice” Young, 12-2, 6 rounds. Junior Castillo, 8-0, stopped in 5th round.

Thomas “Cornflake” Lamanna, 21-2, 8 rounds. So “Boots” stops Flores, in 4 rounds which was quite an accomplishment!
Going the distance or more than four rounds Flores was to be one tough opponent. Speaking of Lamanna, he is promoting and fighting on his June 10th bout at the Claridge Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, and has “Boots” scheduled for 6 rounds. “In the first round he boxed Flores who tried roughing him up.

“Boots” in the second round put on a body attack. In the third Flores stepped on his foot and hit him. “Boots” went up to his highest weight of 149 to Flores 151. He fought at 143 in the amateurs and is 5’10”. In the fourth round he had Flores out on his feet before the fight was stopped. “Boots” only got hit three times,” said “Bozy”.

“Cameron Dunkin is one of the best managers around or the best. He knows how to maneuver his fighters around. A lot of people wanted to sign “Boots” but I dealt with Cameron when I had Anthony Thompson so it was an easy pick,” said “Bozy”.

“Boots” will fight half the fight or more as a southpaw before switching back to his natural orthodox. He goes side to side like the old timers. He looks so relaxed in the ring it’s like a sparring session in “Bozy’s Dungeon” in North Philadelphia over top of the Harrowgate Gym. This young man is a church going member and he doesn’t play around in or out of the ring! Its Philadelphia boxers like him who will put the City of Brotherly Love, or Brotherly shove like I like to call it back on the fistic map in the next couple of years! Remember the name Jaron “Boots” Ennis!

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Brooker and Conquest Win at the SugarHouse Casino Friday in Philadelphia!


Brooker and Conquest Win at the SugarHouse Casino Friday in Philadelphia!
By: Ken Hissner

Kings Promotions once again sold out the SugarHouse Casino Friday night for the second straight show. They will be back in a week at the 2300 Arena in South Philadelphia with Carlos Rosario taking on Joshua Davis in the main event.

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In the main event super middleweight Christopher “Ice” Brooker, 12-3 (5) out of Philadelphia, defeated southpaw Oscar Rojas, 14-8-1 (4), of Monterrey, MEX, in an action packed 8 round bout.

In the opening round Brooker was having problems against his second straight southpaw opponent while his trainer was encouraging him to come forward. In a close round Rojas landed more punches. In the second round Brooker drove Rojas into the ropes only to be hit by countering combinations. Brooker finally broke past the jab of Rojas driving him into the ropes with body punches. In the third round Rojas landed a solid lead left to the chin of Brooker who comes back with a left hook of his own knocking Rojas into the ropes which should have been called a knockdown by referee Esteves, Jr. In the fourth round Brooker goes into a crouch and gets caught with a flurry of uppercuts from Rojas. Brooker caught Rojas with a solid left hook to the head out of a clinch.

In the fifth round Brooker came forward with a double right to the head of Rojas. Brooker drove Rojas into the ropes but got countered with left uppercuts from Rojas in a round almost to hard to call. In the sixth round Brooker landed several left hooks driving Rojas back several steps. Brooker finally lands a lead right to the chin of Rojas. Brooker was much busier as Rojas slowed down. In the seventh round Brooker drove Rojas into the ropes with a flurry of punches. Both fighters knocked heads causing a lapse in the action. A right hook by Brooker to the head of Rojas almost scored a knockdown. In the eighth and final round a counter left hook by Brooker to the chin of Rojas got his attention. Rojas drove Brooker into his corner with a double left hook. At the bell Brooker landed a solid right to the chin of Rojas.

Judges Poturaj, Jasper and Rubenstein all had it 78-74 while this writer had it the same at 78-74.

Lightweight southpaw Jerome “The Conqueror” Conquest, 7-2 (1), of Philadelphia, pitched a shutout over game Daniel Perales, 10-10-1 (5), of Saltilo,
MEX, over 6 rounds.

In the co-feature opening round with Perales coming forward Conquest landed a good combination to the head of Perales. Conquest kept the jab in the face of Perales allowing him to get any offense going. In the second round Conquest counters Perales with combinations to the head. A solid right-hook from Conquest knocked the head of Perales back. The hand speed of Conquest is keeping Perales on the defense. A 3-punch combination by Conquest had Perales head spinning. In the third round Perales finally lands a lead right to the chin of southpaw Conquest. At the bell Conquest from the corner landed a solid left to the head of Perales.

In the fourth round Conquest landed a left uppercut knocking Perales off balance. Perales landed a solid left hook to the head of Conquest who countered with a left to the head. Conquest continued to beat Perales to the punch. In the fifth round Perales knowing he was behind starts throwing punches in bunches until a left to the head from Conquest stops him in his tracks. Perales started showing his frustration as Conquest is landing punches in bunches right up to the bell. In the sixth and final round Conquest is catching Perales coming forward in desperation but getting hit in the head. Peales lands a flurry of punches backing Conquest into the ropes bringing a smile to the face of Conquest. It was Conquest the rest of the round dealing out punches to the head of Perales.

Judges Poturaj and Gradowski 60-54 and Rubenstein 59-55 while this writer had it 60-54.

Super middleweight Blake Mansfield, 4-1-1 (2), of Burlington, NC, lost a hard fought majority decision to southpaw Henry Beckford, 5-6 (1), of
Coram, NY, over 6 rounds.

In the opening round the much taller Beckford used a solid jab keeping Mansfield at bay before coming in under the jab with some uppercuts to the chin of Beckford. A lead right to the chin by Mansfield rocked Beckford at the bell. In the second round Beckford’s jab is keeping Mansfield looking for an opening landing several uppercuts when he gets inside. Beckford’s been warned several times by referee Esteves, Jr., for leaning on top of Mansfield and using his forearm to the head. In the third round another warning to Beckford for holding behind the head and hitting by referee Esteves, Jr. Once again Beckford uses the foreman to the throat of Mansfield and gets away with it. A lead right by Mansfield to the chin of Beckford had him holding on. Mansfield had a welt under his right eye by the end of the round.

In the fourth round several uppercuts to the chin by Mansfield had Beckford holding on. Beckford landed an overhand left to the head of Mansfield then Beckford fell backwards barely staying on his feet. Mansfield turned southpaw landing several right hooks to the head of Beckford who looks like he is out of gas by continuing to grab Mansfield into a clinch. In the fifth round Mansfield lands an overhand right to the head of Beckford who had his right hand caught on a rope strap. Beckford was losing his trunks as referee Esteves again pulled them up. In the sixth and final round Mansfield continued to come forward knocking the trunks of a holding Beckford. Mansfield got inside working uppercuts with both hands to the mid-section of Beckford. Beckford continues to push Mansfield to the ropes while holding him completely out of gas. Mansfield gets in several rights at the bell almost knocking Beckford off his feet.

Judges Poturaj 57-57, Gradowski and Jasper had it 58-56 while this writer had it 57-57.

Cruiserweight southpaw Sam Orapeza, 2-0 (1), of Philadelphia, scored a pair of knockdowns in a wild brawl defeating Kyle McNutt, 1-3 (1), of Battle Creek, MI, who had Orapeza out on his feet at the final bell in a 4 round bout.

In the opening round McNutt came out using his jab as Orapeza was throwing leather to the body an ending it with a solid left to the head of McNutt. A lead straight left by Orapeza to the chin of McNutt and down he went taking the count of referee Bashir. A lead left by Orapeza to the head of McNutt drove him into the ropes. In the second round both fighters exchanged shots to the head. Orapeza was landing lead lefts to the head with McNutt covering up. McNutt came back with a good body attack. A lead left by Orapeza to the chin of McNutt rocked him. McNutt landed several uppercuts making Orapeza fall into him. Then McNutt ended the round with three left hooks to the head of Orapeza. In the third round McNutt used his jab well while Orapeza may be tiring. Orapeza came back driving McNutt into the ropes but McNutt countered Orapeza back blooding his nose. Orapeza with his many backers screaming for him started throwing punches in bunches. In the fourth and final round a lead right by McNutt landed well on the chin of Orapeza who came back landing an overhand left on the chin of McNutt dropping him to the canvas. Referee Bashir gave him the 8 count. Both fighters landed solid punches as McNutt had Orapeza out on his feet at the bell.

Judges Jasper 38-37, Gradowski 39-35 and Rubenstein 39-36 with this writer having it 39-36.

Super lightweight Jeffrey Torres, 3-0 (1), of Philadelphia, defeated southpaw Kashon Hutchinson, 2-3 (1), of Reading, PA, over 4 rounds.

In the opening round Hutchinson used a jab to keep Torres at bay. Hutchinson landed a left uppercut to the mid-section of Torres whose defense is wide open with hands to his side. In the second round Torres landed a left hook to the chin of Hutchinson knocking him back several steps. Torres pinned Hutchinson against the ropes getting half a dozen punches in before Hutchinson spun out. A solid left hook by Torres at the ten second mark was followed by another seconds later knocking the mouthpiece out of Hutchinson. In the third round both boxers were exchanging head shots forgetting the body blows. Hutchinson landed a 3-punch combination with no return from Torres. A counter left hook by Torres rocked Hutchinson. In the fourth and final round Hutchinson started using his jab as he did in the first round but Torres was countering with lead rights to the head. Torres can’t miss with those lead rights down the pike landing on Hutchinson’s head.

Judges Rubenstein and Poturaj 39-37 and Gradowski 40-36 with this writer 39-37.

Bantamweight Harold Lopez, 1-0-1 (1), of Allentown, PA, scoring a knockdown had to settle for a draw with Basyzber Baratov, 2-1-2 (0), of Philadelphia, over 4 rounds.

In the opening round a counter right to the head from Lopez rocked Baratov. Half a round later it was Baratov with a right to the head rocking Lopez. There was no feeling out in this round. In the second round Baratov rocked Lopez with a combination to the head. In this round there were more wild misses than punches landed. In the third round a Baratov lead right caught Lopez on the side of his head getting his attention. Lopez landed a straight right to the chin of Baratov driving him into the ropes. Baratov came back with a right to the head of Lopez. Then Lopez rocked Baratov into the ropes and shortly after dropped him with another right which was a questionable call by referee Bashir. In the fourth and final round both are swinging for the fences with as many misses as hits. It got very sloppy in there until Lopez rocked Baratov with a right to the chin.

Judges Gradowski 39-38 Lopez, Rubenstein and Jasper a 38-38 draw, and this writer 38-37 Lopez.

In the opening bout super featherweight Chaise Nelson, 5-1 (3), of Dayton, OH, came off the canvas to gain a narrow decision over southpaw Bryan Nevarez, 2-5-1 (1), of Carolina, PR,

Nelson took the first and was winning the second round when a straight left from Nevarez dropped him just before the bell. Referee Esteves, Jr. counted as the bell sounded and Nelson was up. In round three Nelson came back to take a close round. In the fourth and final round both boxers were trying for the knockout. Elson was landing some haymakers but Nevarez hung in there.

Judges Rubenstein, Jasper 38-37 Gradowski 39-37 this writer 38-37.

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Philly’s Fab Four Turned Professional in 2016 and Are 31-0-1!


Philly’s Fab Four Turned Professional in 2016 and Are 31-0-1!
By: Ken Hissner

The year was 2016 that five Philly boxers were to go to the Olympic in Brazil! The best looking prospect to come out of Philly since 1984 Olympic Gold Medalist Meldrick Taylor in this writer’s opinion is Jaron “Boots” Ennis, 10-0 (8), from the Germantown section of Philly at 19. He was 58-3 in the amateurs. His father Bozy Ennis is his trainer and possibly the best in the city. Cameron Dunkin is his manager and Victory Promotions his promoter. He could have signed with Top Rank but Dunkin chose Victory Promotions promoted by Chris Middendorf. Top Rank Promotions were not thrilled with Dunkin’s decision who he usually works with.

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Ennis defeated Gary Antuanne Russell in his first fight in the Olympic Trials and followed it with two more wins. Then in the box-off he lost back to back matches to Russell who was one of four men to go to the Olympics in Brazil. Bozy Ennis was not happy with the two losses but said “we beat him but they stole it. I’d give Russell the third time.”

Ennis made his professional debut in April in St. George Utah and stopped Cory Muldrew in 0:42 of the first round. He defeated Luis Ramos in 0:23 in Philly in May for his second win. In June he stopped Deshawn Debose in 0:20 of the first round in Springfield, VA, for his third win. Then in July for his third win he stopped Tavorus Teague at 1:38 of the fourth round in Rio Rancho, NM, for his fourth win.

In August in his fifth win he stopped Matt Murphy at 2:52 of the second round in Bristol, PA, for his fifth win. “Murphy had just stopped a 3-0 boxer in his previous fight,” said Ennis. He won his sixth fight when he defeated Eddie Diaz at 2300 Arena in Philly on September 15th. Diaz was from Compton, CA, one of the toughest areas in the country. Ennis is 5:10 and after competing at 141 in the amateurs he’s now a welterweight but just a couple of pounds over 141.”He’s doing pretty good defeating all the opponents he’s fought so far. Even I don’t always realize when he switches from orthodox to southpaw. After seeing him in the Diaz fight I am moving he up to 147 and no more 143 fights,” said Ennis.

“Boots” won his seventh fight on November 11th at the 2300 Arena where he stopped Chris Alexander, 4-3, in 4 rounds. Then he won his eighth fight on December 10th at the Sands Casino in Bethlehem, PA, stopping Marcus Becker, 3-4-3, in the sixth and final round. “I will be back in the ring January 28th at the 2300 Arena that my promoter Chris Middendorf of Victory Promotions is running. On January 28th “Boots’ knocked out Elvin Perez, 28-17-4, at 0:35 of the first round at the 2300 Arena. On March 31st at the 2300 Arena, Ennis won his tenth straight in a rough and tumble bout that saw him body slammed to the canvas and punched while on the mat. His opponent James “Shotgun” Winchester, 20-12, paid the price taking a vicious body attack and a cut over his right eye. He was looking to be DQ’d to prevent more of a beating but was able to stay on his feet for the entire six rounds losing 60-53 on all judge’s score cards.

“Boots” two brothers have been pro’s first. Farah “Quiet Storm”, 22-2 (12), won the NABF Super Middleweight while the oldest brother Derek “Pooh” Ennis, 24-5-1 (13), won the USBA Super welterweight and the PA Super welterweight titles. “Boots” has a combination of both brothers and then some of his own. He is orthodox but fights some of his bouts southpaw. He trains at “Bozy’s Dungeon” in North Philly run by his father over top of Harrowgate’s Boxing Club on E. Venago Street off Kensington Avenue.

In 2015 “Boots” won the National Youth title in January. In May he won the National Golden Gloves title. He took lost in the Olympic Trials in December and was asked to be an alternate but his father turned it down to turn professional. At the Olympic Trial Qualifiers in Philly he won all five bouts.

Joshua Jones, 4-0-1 (2), signed with Dunkin and Victory Promotions along with Ennis. He trains at Shuler’s Gym and is trained by Hamza Muhammad. Jones is 23 and a Super lightweight. He made his debut in April in Utah along with “Boots” stopping Jason Thompson at 2:33 of the third round.

In June of 2016 both Jones and Ennis were on the Springfield, VA, show where Jones stopped Christopher Kuhn at 1:52 of the first round. In July he fought to a majority draw with Ahmet Kayretli in Erie, PA, getting a 39-37 vote with the other two having it 38-38. “He could have done better but he certainly deserved the fight. The opponent came in at 139 and was 150 at fight time. Jones has a fight scheduled for November 11th in Philadelphia at 2300 Arena meeting Corey Edwards, 2-1.

“I believe Boots, Tight and Christian are great and I believe we will all do big things in boxing,” said Jones. He returned to the ring after four months on March 31st taking a decision over Dustin Arnold, 1-0, by scores of 40-36 twice and 39-37, at the 2300 Arena in South Philly.

Darmani “Tight” Rock, 8-0 (5), is a super heavyweight at 6:05 and averaging just under 250. He is trained by his father Wayne “Wiz”. They go between their own Rock Solid Boxing Gym at 2840 Chatman Street in Frankford section of North Philly. His promoter is Jay Z’s Roc Nation. In 2014 he won the Youth World Title in Bulgaria and in 2015 the US Nationals. He also won the 2015 National Golden Gloves. He made it as far as the Olympic Trials semi-finals.

In May Rock turned pro in D.C. stopping Carlos Black at 1:54 in round one in D.C. In June he stopped Bobby Favors who weighed 402 lbs. at 1:46 of round one in Quincy, MASS. In July he stopped Hassan Lee at 2:21 in round one in Pittsburgh. In August he won over Mike Kyle in Oakland 40-35 and a pair of 39-37’s. He is 20. In October he stopped John Orr in Winchester, VA. On November 19th in Las Vegas, NV, he defeated Brice Ritani Coe, 4-4-1, by decision, November 19th at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

Rock knocked out Solomon Maye, 3-7-2, January 20th at Bally’s Event Center in Atlantic City, NJ. “My dad has trained me since I started at 12 or 13. I feel that I will get better and better with each fight,” said Rock. On March 18th he won a 6 round decision over Jon Bolden, 8-10-1, at the Mountaineer Casino Ballroom, in New Cumberland, WV. At the 2300 Arena show he had his right hand bandaged which he said the injury went back to the Maye knockout.

The final one of the Fab Four is Bantamweight Christian Carto, 9-0 (9), of South Philly was an Olympic Trials Bronze medalist and went to the training camp in Colorado to help others after the trials. He is trained by Mickey Rosati, Jr. Mickey was a PA State GG champion. His gym is over his Business Rosati’s Auto Repair Shop at 1937 S. Chadwick St., in South Philly. “He is a rare breed who comes in the gym six days a week. I’ve trained him for the past 3 years. He’s a pleasure to train because he listens. He’s up to bantamweight,” said Rosati.

Carto was the 108 National Golden Gloves Champion in 2014 defeating Leroy “Lucious” Davila who was No. 1 in the nation and 4-0 now as a pro. “I was with him when he beat Davila who was the best in the country,” said Rosati. Carto finished third in the 2015 Golden Gloves. His father Frank is always there to support his son who is 20. His brother Frank, Jr. won the Novice at 141 in the Golden Gloves this year.

Carto turned pro at the Santander Arena in Reading, PA, stopping Rahkeem Parker who wouldn’t come out after three rounds. In his second bout he stopped Christopher Nelson at the Claridge Casino in Atlantic City in the third round just 20 days later after his debut. In August in his third bout he stopped Jonathan Hernandez at 1:02 of the second round at the SugarHouse Casino in Philly. In his fourth bout on October 28th Carto stopped Angel Carvajal, 2-4, in the second round.

In his fifth fight on November 12th he stopped Leonardo Reyes, 5-10, in the second round. Carto has a big following which showed in his last fight with all the Carto shirts. He boxes well with good balance and is finding some punching power in the professionals. He won his sixth straight at the SugarHouse Casino in Philly on December 16th. He knocked out Harold Reyes, 2-6-1, in the second round. During the referee’s instructions to start the bout Reye’s trainer said “now you are in with a man.” Carto’s trainer Mickey Rosati said “I can’t believe he said that. That’s just not right.” After the first round of which Carto won big he pointed to the trainer of Reye’s in the corner saying something. After knocking Reye’s out in the second round Carto again pointed to the trainer with some choice words. In his seventh fight he stopped Sergio Najera, 12-28-2, of Mexico, at 2:06 of the third round at the SugarHouse Casino. In his eighth fight he stopped Rudolph “the Cutting Edge” Hedge, 10-4-3, of Jamaica after four rounds and not coming out for fifth round at the Fillmore, in Philly.

Carto on April 29th at the Liacouras Center won his 9th straight by stoppage over Samuel Gutierrez, 14-18-5 at the end of 5 in a scheduled 6.

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There Was Only One Philly Blue Horizon & Ring Magazine Voted It #1 in the World!


There Was Only One Philly Blue Horizon & Ring Magazine Voted It #1 in the World!
By: Ken Hissner

The Blue Horizon is a historic 1,500-seat former boxing venue in Philadelphia. The Ring magazine voted it the number-one boxing venue in the world, and Sports Illustrated noted it as the last great boxing venue in the country.

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The Blue Horizon was originally constructed as three four-story Second Empire style houses in 1865. Originally built to house the nouveau riche, the properties were eventually sold to the Loyal Order of Moose. Architect Carl Berger oversaw the 1914 alterations to house the fraternal lodge, adding a ballroom, bar, and auditorium. Lodge #54, located at 1312-1316 North Broad Street had over 20,000 members by 1920, at that point the highest membership of any fraternal lodge in the world. By the late 1920s, membership had reached over 40,000 and plans were made for an extensive expansion of the building; however the Great Depression forced Lodge #54 to abandon their plans. The building also got its first taste of professional boxing during the Moose era, with two fight cards on March 1 and March 28 of 1938. The March 28th card featured heavyweight Willie Reddish, who later trained Sonny Liston and Joe Frazier.

Jimmy Toppi Sr. purchased the building in 1961 for $85,000, and renamed it after the song “Beyond the Blue Horizon” from the 1930 film Monte Carlo. After another series of renovations, regular boxing shows began in the Blue Horizon on November 3, 1961. The main event featured Hall of Famer George Benton against Chico Corsey, a late substitute. The early days of the building as a boxing venue saw regular weekly shows. Promoter Marty Kramer was given a grant from Madison Square Garden to put on these matches in order to develop young fighters. Kramer promoted over 30 main events before leaving the Blue Horizon in 1963.

Promoter Herman Taylor then hosted three nationally televised bouts at the venue in 1963 and 1964, featuring Jose Stable, Dick Turner, Harold Johnson, Henry Hank, Stanley Hayward, and Curtis Cokes. On May 26, 1966 “Gypsy” Joe Harris took a 10 round decision over Johnny Knight in a fight promoted by Lou Lucchese. There would be no more fights until September 30, 1969, when J. Russell Peltz had his first promotion of his Hall of Fame career. Peltz set a site attendance record of 1,606 in his first of many cards at the Blue Horizon. Peltz would leave the Blue in 1971 after 31 cards to promote at bigger venues like the Spectrum, but would return in 1974. Peltz would promote more fights at the Blue Horizon than anyone else in its history.

The Peltz era brought Philadelphia greats such as Matthew Saad Muhammad, Bernard Hopkins, Cyclone Hart, Tim Witherspoon, and Bennie Briscoe. Peltz left the Blue Horizon in 2001, came back to promote one card in 2004 and three card in 2009 for the last time.

In 1994, the site was purchased by Vernoca L. Michael, Carol P. Ray, and Carol M.A. Whitaker. In 1998, Vernoca Michael became licensed as the first female African American boxing promoter in the state of Pennsylvania. She has promoted bouts since featuring established fighters such as Eddie Chambers, Yusef Mack, and Lajuan Simon.

On December 2, 1997, the venue held its first world title fight when Peltz promoted Charles Brewer in a defense of his International Boxing Federation super middleweight crown. The Blue Horizon has also hosted international, regional, and state title fights.

In 2008, Ms. Michael was named one of Top 50 Women in Business in the State of Pennsylvania by Governor Ed Rendell.

Michael has worked to make the building a cultural center for the surrounding neighborhood by creating a learning center with connections to Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania and a Philadelphia Boxing Museum. The venue also hosts special events, meetings, receptions, weddings, and cabarets.

The Blue Horizon appears in the film Rocky V as some of the fight scenes with Tommy Morrison were filmed there. The building was also used to film the boxing scenes in the movie Annapolis.

The Blue Horizon was closed, reportedly due to tax problems, in June 2010. In January 2011, it was announced that $6 million had been granted to help West Philadelphia developer Mosaic Development Partners build an $18 million hotel-and-restaurant complex with a jazz bar and fitness center at the site of the Blue Horizon. In July 2013, Mosaic’s plans called for the venue to be demolished in order to make way for a parking garage.

The last show was June 04, 2010 with Farah Ennis winning in the main event.

“Rockin” Rodney Moore claims to have fought there 27 times. Box Rec shows he was 20-1-1 at the Blue.

As of May 2017 the venue along with the upgraded boxing ring remains untouched, abandoned and in remarkably good to pristine condition with virtually no signs of any interior damage or structural problems since its closing in 2010.

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Anthony “Bad Boy” Burgin loses split decision to Avery Sparrow in an All Philly War at 2300 Arena Friday!


Anthony “Bad Boy” Burgin loses split decision to Avery Sparrow in an All Philly War at 2300 Arena Friday!
By: Ken Hissner

Peltz Boxing, BAM Boxing, Joe Hand Promotions and Raging Babe returned to the 2300 Arena in South Philly with an all Philly main event. J Russell Peltz and BAM Rodgers served as matchmakers. This was the way Philly boxing should be!

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In the main event lightweight Anthony “Bad Boy” Burgin, 10-3 (2), of N. Philly, lost a split decision to returning after a year Avery Sparrow, 6-1 (3), of N. Philly, over 8 rounds. Burgin was dropped once.

In the opening round Sparrow showed his quickness outworking Burgin. In the second round Sparrow continued being the quicker of the two but Burgin landed a “bolo punch” right to the midsection of Sparrow. It was a close round. In the third round Burgin came alive. It was a good round for Burgin who had been very methodical up to this point.

In the fourth round Sparrow landed a 3-punch combination getting Burgin’s attention. Burgin continued being the aggressor for the most part. A hard left hook by Burgin to the chin got Sparrow’s attention with about a minute left in the round. It was another close round. In the fifth round Sparrow outmaneuvered Burgin scoring points. Sparrow continues with hands low dancing around using angles to score points. In the sixth round Burgin drove Sparrow into the ropes with a combination. A right uppercut by Sparrow dropped Burgin to the canvas. He was able to box his way out of the round. In the seventh round Sparrow kept stepping around landing the jab but Burgin was landing the harder punches with left hooks to the head of Sparrow. In the eighth and final round Sparrow looked spent but kept moving as Burgin landed powerful left hook’s to the body. Both fighters let it all hang out right up to the bell.

Judge Myra Grant 76-75 Burgin, Judge Steve Weisfeld 76-75 Sparrow and judge John Poturaj 77-74 Sparrow as did this writer. Gary Rosato was the referee.

Super welterweight Fred Jenkins, Jr., 10-4 (1), of N. Philly, suffered a mild upset losing to Panama’s Roque Zapata, 3-1-3, of Culpeper, VA, by decision over 6 rounds. That’s two in a row for Zapata over Philly fighters.

In the first round Jenkins worked well to the body but got tagged midway by a right from Zapata on the chin. Just prior to the bell a short right by Zapata to the chin of Jenkins dropped him to a knee. He was up immediately but took the count from referee Bashir. In the second round Jenkins outworked Zapata who had a sneaky right that came out several times on the chin of Jenkins stopping him in his tracks. In the third round Jenkins did a workman like job and knocked out the mouthpiece of Zapata with a left hook to the chin.

In the fourth round Zapata started getting busier than he had in the first two rounds. He rocked Jenkins with a hard left hook to the chin. Jenkins lands punches well but leaves himself open for a counter. In the fifth round Zapata was beating Jenkins to the punch. An overhand right from Zapata to the chin rocked Jenkins. A Zapata right to the chin of Jenkins just prior to the bell had him wobble back to his corner. In the sixth and final round Zapata was looking for the knockout landing several power punch rights to the head of Jenkins who seemed to be fighting on instinct after being hurt bad at the end of the previous round.

Judge Jasper 57-56, judge’s Poturaj and Weisfeld 59-54. This writer had it 58-56.

Heavyweight Cassius Chaney, 9-0 (5), of W. Philly, won a majority lack luster decision over Tommy Washington, Jr., 6-10-1 (2), of Lansing, MICH, over 6 rounds.

In the opening round Chaney used his height and reach to out box Washington until a minute left in the round when Chaney landed 3 power punch right hands to the chin of Washington. In the second round Chaney continued to box Washington until a minute left in the round when Washington had enough and let it all hang out swarming over Chaney. By the end of the round Chaney was back in control. In the third round Chaney continued using his jab in a slow round.

In the fourth round at the halfway point Washington backed Chaney into a corner and landed a flurry of punches. Once back into the middle of the ring Chaney regained control. In the fifth round Chaney seemed to be running out of gas as Washington became more and more aggressive. In the sixth and final round of a close round Chaney rocked Washington with a right hand to the chin knocking him back several feet but he tied Chaney up until the bell sounded.

Judge Gail Jasper 57-57, John Poturaj and Steve Weisfeld 59-55 for Chaney. This writer had it 58-56 for Chaney.

Super welterweight Isaiah Wise, 4-1 (3), of S. Philly, stopped Jeffrey “The Prototype” Wright, 4-6-1 (4), of Milwaukee, WI, at 0:32 of the 4th round of a scheduled 6.

In the opening round it was all Wise with double left hooks to the body and head. The only moment Wright had was at the midway point of the round landing a stunning right to the chin of Wise having him hold on until his head cleared. In the second round Wise had Wright going thru the ropes and kept punch him before referee Rosato finally pulled Wise off. Wise was dishing out plenty of punishment until a right hand from Wright landed on the chin of Wise and down he went taking a knee.

In the third round it was all Wise with wicked body shots until a left hook to the body dropped Wright who beat the count but was dangerous to the end of the round. In the fourth round a flurry of punches by Wise dropped Wright. He beat the count but was obviously finished. Referee Rosato wisely stopped the bout.

Lightweight Joseph “Blessed Hands” Adorno, 3-0 (3), of Allentown, PA, electrified the fans and stopped Marco Ocano, 1-1 (1), of Agua Prieta, MEX, at 0:45 of the first round. Referee Bashir counted him out.

Ocano came out aggressively running into several left hooks by Adorno. Adorno landed an overhand right to the chin of Ocano having him out on his feet when referee Bashir wisely stepped in and stopped it. Adorno’s many fans went ballistic with the quick stoppage.

Lightweight southpaw PR Victor Padilla, 3-0 (3), of Berlin, NJ, scored a pair of knockdowns stopping Carlos Castillo, 4-5 (3), of Tucson, AZ, at 0:48 of the first round to the delight of his many fans.

Castillo raced out but ran into a left hook from Padilla and down he went. Shortly after Castillo got up he attacked Padilla with both throwing bombs until a Padilla left hook dropped Castillo face first to the canvas. He beat the count and argued with referee Blair Talmadge that he wanted to go on but the fight was over. Padilla had many fans going wild with the quick stoppage.

Super middleweight Chris “Sandman” Thomas, 5-0 (2), of Beachwood, NJ, easily defeated Mike Rodriguez, 0-5 (0), of Springfield, MASS, over 4 lopsided rounds. Referee Bashir had to break up the fighters throughout due to the holding of Rodriguez.

In the opening round Thomas took it to the much taller Rodriguez who spent the entire round doing more holding than punching. In the second round referee Ron Bashir saw enough of the holding and took a point from Rodriguez. In the third round and fourth round the awkward Thomas continued to outwork Rodriguez who continued holding.

Judges Jasper 39-36, Poturaj and Grant 40-35 as did this writer.

Super bantamweight PR Crystian Pequero, 1-0 (1), of NE Philly, made a sensational debut stopping Alonzo Davis, 0-1 (0), of W. Philly, at 2:12 of the third with a vicious body attack for the count.

In the opening round both fighters came out going at it. In the final minute Pequero landed hard rights to the side of Davis on two occasions hurting him. In the second round Pequero continued with the body shots until near the end of the round also going to the head having Davis out on his feet at the bell after receiving four body shots from Pequero.

In the third round with his fans yelling “Pequero, Pequero” Pequero continued working the body of Davis. A right uppercut to the midsection sent Davis down taking the count on one knee from referee Talmidge. In the corner of Pequero was Javier Varella.

In the opening bout flyweight Basyzbek Bartov, 1-1-1 (0), of KYR, NE Philly, won a split decision over Tyrone “T-Bone” Arzeno, 0-0 (0), of N. Philly, in an all action bout.

In the opening round both boxers let it all hang out. It was back and forth with Arzeno possibly having a slight edge. In the second round it was all Baratov putting pressure on Arzeno having him hurt against the ropes just prior to the bell. In the third round it was more of the Baratov did what he does best and slug. Arzeno’s round.

Judge Poturaj 39-37 Arzeno, Judge Grant and Jasper 39-37 Baratov. This writer had it 38-38. Chuck Diesel in Baratov’s corner and Chino Rivas in Arzeno’s corner.

Flyweight Ernesto Almodovar, 1-0 (0), of NE Philly, scored a knockdown and won a decision over 34 year-old debuting southpaw Steven Lopez, 0-1 (0), NE Philly, who never stopped trying, over 4.

In the opening round the southpaw Lopez boxed well keeping Almodovar on the defense until a lead right hand by Almodovar landed on the chin of Lopez dropping him. In the second and third rounds Almodovar used the lead right to keep Lopez in check. In the fourth and final round Lopez Almodovar got the better of the mix though it was Lopez coming forward not able to block the right.

Judge’s Jasper and Poturaj had it 39-36 while judge Weisfeld and this writer had it 40-35.

Ring announcer was Steve Mittman while Mike Mittman and Marc Abrams did the commentating for GFL-TV. Next show is June 2nd.

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Two Philly Boxing Events This Weekend Friday & Saturday!


Two Philly Boxing Events This Weekend Friday & Saturday!
By: Ken Hissner

There have only been 3 events in Pennsylvania this year and 2 of them were in Philly and sub-par shows. This weekend the two top promoters bring shows in Peltz Boxing and Kings Promotions.

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On Friday at the 2300 Arena in South Philly J Russell Peltz brings in what he does best in Philly vs Philly on top! Underneath he will have 10 more fights which is quite unusual for Peltz.

In the main event lightweight Anthony “Bad Boy” Burgin, 10-2 (2), has spent the last 8 weeks in Puerto Rico under trainer Raul “Chino” Rivas. “The new things I learned and did there helped bring my talent to another level physically and mentally. The feeling of fighting the main event in Philly is unbelievable. I have been sparring with Michael Perez and a few other guys from PR,” said Burgin.

His trainer Raul “Chino” Rivas had this to say “Anthony looks amazing like he’s fighting for a world title.”

In the opposite corner that night will be another Philly fighter in Avery Sparrow, 5-1 (3). “Camp has been the best ever. I feel the best I have ever felt in my whole career. We worked hard and smart,” said Sparrow. His trainer Greg Jackson had this to say, “Everyone knows what it is. Everyone is coming to see Anthony Burgin get his head chopped off. This is an execution!”

The semi-final will pit super welterweight Fred Jenkins, Jr., 10-3 (1), against returning visitor Roque Zapata, 2-1-3 (0), who in his last fight defeated Philly’s Isaiah Wise. “I saw him fight Isaiah Wise and it was a good fight. One thing I noticed he threw a lot of punches and Wise was still fighting,” said Jenkins, Jr. His father train had this to say “Fred looks superb. Whatever Zapata brings to the table Fred is ready to match it,” said Jenkins, Sr.

“I am not worried about coming to his backyard or being the underdog. In my MMA days and in boxing I’ve been fighting in the other guy’s back yard a lot and I love it,” said Zapata. His trainer Eric Zamora had this to say “he’s very focused and hungry for this fight. He’s put in enough hard work to have his hand raised on March 10th!”

On the undercard will feature two of the best Puerto Ricans from the area in separate bouts in Victor Padilla, 2-0 (2), of Berlin, NJ, and Joseph “Blessed Hands” Adorno, 2-0 (2), from Allentown, PA. Isaiah Wise, 3-1 will be back. Also returning from out of CT will be heavyweight Cassius Chaney, 8-0. Philly’s Marcel Rivers, 1-0 and Chris “Sandman” Thomas, 4-0, from Blackwood, NJ.

Completing the 10 undercard fights will be debuting Puerto Rican Crystian Peguero, of Philly and Basyzbek Baratov, 1-1-1, of KYR, and now Philly, Ernesto Almodovar debuting from Philly.

First fight will be at 7:30. Besides Peltz, BAM and Joe Hand Promotions along with Park Casino and Coors Light will handle the promotion.

On Saturday night Kings Promotion will have one of Philly’s knockout artists on top in Tyrone Brunson, 23-6-2 (22), facing Brandon Quarles, 18-3-1 (9), of Alexandria, VA. Philly’s David Gonzales, 8-1-2 (2), Tyrone Crawley, Jr., 6-0 (0), with Daquan Johnson, 2-0 (2), of Cherry Hill, NJ, will be taking on Philly’s Vincent Floyd, 1-2 (0). Carlos Rosario, 6-1 (3), of Pennsauken, NJ, Upper Darby’s Brandon Robinson, 1-1 (1), and debuting Philly boxer Terry Crowder as well as Philly’s Sam Orapeza will feature 8 fights.

The event will be at the SugarHouse Casino in Philly.

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“The New” Ray Robinson Wins in Philly’s “Friday Night Boxing”!


“The New” Ray Robinson Wins in Philly’s “Friday Night Boxing”!
By: Ken Hissner

Hard Hitting Promotions continue filling up the seats at the SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia with co-promoters Manny Rivera and Will Ruiz leading the way!

In the Main Event the WBC No. 9 welterweight contender “The New” Ray Robinson, 22-2 (11), Philly, knocked out Edwin Palacios, 12-5-1 (8), NIC, at 2:39 of the second round posting his eleventh straight win.

In the opening round the southpaw Robinson used an effective jab. Palacios landed a straight right to the chin of Robinson getting a reaction from the crowd. Just prior to the bell an overhand left by Robinson drove Palacios into the corner and down. He was up as the bell sounded.

In the second round Robinson became very aggressive landing a good body punch with a left hook. A straight left dropped Palacios who was holding his nose taking the count on one knee as referee Gary Rosato counted him out.

“I didn’t know until the weigh-in that Palacio was so tall. After a feeling out round my trainer (“Bozy” Ennis) and I figured it out to go to the body and it worked,” said Robinson. This win puts Robinson one step closer to moving up in the rankings and a title fight.

Bantamweight Christian Carto, 7-0 (7), of Philly, stopped Sergio Najera, 12-29-2 (6), of MEX, at 2:06 of the third round.

In the first round on two separate occasions a Carto jab put Najera back several steps. Near the end of the round Najera had Carto in a corner and landed several punches to the head of Carto who came back as the bell sounded. In the second round a roundhouse right by Najera landed on the neck of Carto. A lead right hand by Carto drove Najera into the ropes. With about ten seconds left in the round Carto rocked Najera with a right to the chin.

In the third round Najera continued to throw wild punches as Carto countered him well while avoiding those wild swings. Carto opened up with punches in bunches having Najera backing up taking a beating time and again when referee Talmadge saw enough and stepped in and waved it off saving Najera from any unnecessary punishment. Najera came in nine pounds over the contracted weight but was able to take three pounds off with Carto giving away five pounds. “I knew he was heavier than me but knew I would eventually catch up to him,” said Carto. That’s seven straight knockouts in as many fights.

Lightweight prospect Branden “The Gift” Pizarro, 3-0 (2), of Philly, knocked out Abdiel Padilla, 1-1 (1), of PR, at 2:52 of the first round.

In a mismatch Pizarro chased Padilla who mostly covered up but for some reason would end up in a corner and Pizarro would pummel him. When Padilla ended up in the opposite corner it was all over as Pizarro landed a flurry of body punches dropping Padilla to the canvas and not making an effort to get up as referee Bashir counted him out.

Super featherweight Cuban Hairon “El Maja” Socarras, 15-0-2 (10), of Miami, FL, outpointed German “Pan Teonero” Meraz, 55-41-1 (32), of Sonora, MEX, over six dull rounds.

About a minute into the round a combination from Socarras to the head and down went Meraz. Referee Rosato gave him the eight count and Meraz got up and managed to get to the end of the round. In the second and third rounds Socarras simply landed more punches then Meraz with some good left hooks to the body.

In the fourth and fifth rounds the pace continued with Meraz seemingly looking to coast to the distance. In the sixth and final round Socarras did enough to win the round and just before the bell sounded he landed his best punch since the first round a left hook to the chin of Meraz.

All three Steve Weisfeld, Alan Rubenstein and Anthony Lundy scored it 60-53 for Socarras.

Super featherweight Joseph “Blessed Hands” Adorno, 2-0 (2), out of Allentown, PA, knocked out Jonathan Hernandez, 0-4, PR, at 0:18 of the first round.

Adorno threw one punch a right hand to the head of Hernandez and down he went. The referee Blair Talmadge waved it off without a count knowing Hernandez was out before he hit the canvas. The ring physician immediately came into the ring. After close to ten minutes Hernandez was able to get up on his own and leave the ring.

Lightweight Victor Padilla, 2-0 (2), of Berlin, NJ, knocked out Tony Wilson, 0-2 (0), VA, at 0:30 of the first round.

Padilla went out fast looking for the knockout and it came that fast landing a combination to the chin of Wilson. Referee Bashir counted Wilson out on a knee.

Super flyweight Harold Lopez, 1-0 (1), of Allentown, PA, made his debut a good one when he knocked out Argenis Armando, 0-1 (0), at 0:57 of the first round in a mismatch.

In the opening round hit Armando about four times and down he went refusing to get up until the referee Talmadge said “ten”!

The opponent for Kali Reis, who is a former world champion never showed up. Kita Watkins who challenged for the world title three times made the weigh-in Thursday night but didn’t show up for the fight.

The fans seemed to enjoy all the early knockouts and continue to fill the arena at the SugarHouse Casino. A ten count was given for veteran trainer George James, the manager of Christian Carto Jimmy Binns, Jr., and the father of top cut-man Joey Eye after a long illness.

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