Tag Archives: boxing training

Boxing Training Myths


By Bryanna Fissori 

There are a number of boxing training myths about the proper way to improve and stay in shape. Some of this is from watching too many old-school boxing movies and some is just from a general lack of knowledge. Here are some things you should know:

Six Packs are not built on 1000 crunches a day

Having a strong core is crucial for boxers and also aesthetically pleasing. The concept of completing 1000 crunches a day is helpful, but not the best way to achieve visual results. The appearance of abs heavily dependent upon body fat percentage. The lower the body fat, the more evident the abs. This is why even people who are undernourished may have evidence of abs without the gym time. This does not mean that abdominal exercises are not important for core strength. They are very much so, but this also involves targeting different areas of the core to promote stability rather than focusing on the short movement of crunches. Essentially, six packs are made in the kitchen. 

Shadowboxing with dumbbells

It sounds like a good idea. Adding weight to your punches should make them faster and make you stronger. Unfortunately, this is a boxing training myth. The torque and strain that the extra weight places on the shoulders and lumbar spine have been known to result in injury. There are a number of other strength and speed building exercises that have been shown to produce results with significantly less risk. Boxing can already be painful enough. Don’t make it worse by unnecessarily wearing down your joints and tendons. 

Long Slow Distance is the best roadwork

Roadwork is the cardio based effort that is put in to complement training in a specific sport. Many people are under the assumption that the more miles you run, the better your conditioning will be. Though endurance training is helpful, it is not the end all be all. Energy systems used for boxing are primarily anaerobic, comprised of short bursts 70 to 80 percent of the time. This means that high intensity training is crucial for affective roadwork.

Weight Training will make you slower

Some athletes are naturally gifted with muscular genetics. Fighters like Mike Tyson may not need to hit the weight room because their power and physique does not require that specific training, but for the vast majority of athletes, weight training provides a significant advantage. If two fighters have the same skill level and one is stronger, the stronger has a higher chance of victory. Weight lifting will not hinder speed unless the fighter does not train speed and flexibility.  

Hitting hard all the time makes your punches more powerful

Building power from just hitting stuff hard is a boxing training myth. Technique is key for improving punching power. That is all there is to it. You can stand in front of a heavy bag and throw everything you have at it, but unless you are using proper technique, your power will not increase. 

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Use a Pre-Workout to Help Kill it in Boxing Class


By Bryanna Fissori 

A pre-workout is some form of a consumable substance that is formatted to boost your performance during your workout, or at least get you motivated. 

There are a plethora to choose from, all complete with unique colors and flavors.  There are natural foods that will help boost energy and performance, but the term “pre-workout” typically relates to powder that you mix into water and drink 15 to 30 minutes before a workout session. 

What is in Pre Workout Powder?

Caffeine

The big boost of energy that comes from a pre-workout is highly instigated by caffeine. The compounds in caffeine work by blocking the neurotransmitters for adenosine, which serves the purpose of making the body tired. Caffeine has also been found to have some effect on promoting weight loss. The amount in pre-workout differs for each brand but typically ranges between 150 and 350mg per dose. Because of this, it is a good idea to adjust your scoop of pre-workout to your desired level of caffeination. 

Beta-Alanine

This is the substance responsible for the “tingly feeling” you may get shortly after taking a pre-workout supplement. The good news is that the tingles are relatively short-lived. Beta-Alanine is a naturally occurring amino acid that helps to delay the onset of muscle fatigue, meaning you can train at a higher intensity longer without your muscles getting tired. 

Niacin

Having enough niacin (Vitamin B3) in your system is important for general good health. Niacin helps the dilation of blood vessels for an extra “pump” during hard workouts. It also promotes energy, potential weight loss and is proved to be beneficial for skin health, prevention of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Niacin may also be the culprit for the warm feeling on your face after taking a pre-workout. 

Creatine

A staple for most bodybuilders, creatine is known to hydrate muscles, increasing size and strength. There are also studies showing improved performance with shorter workouts, but less variance for endurance athletes. Creatine may also assist in muscle recovery after a hard workout session. 

BCAA

Branch Chain Amino Acids (BCAA’s) are the building blocks for protein synthesis. They also assist in reducing the rate of protein breakdown. Increased protein synthesis and reduced breakdown means more muscles and less body fat. That sounds pretty awesome. Another positive thing about BCAA’s is that they are also available in a non-stimulant form and can be added to your drinking water any time during the day. 

These are the most common ingredients that make up powdered pre-workout, but each brand boasts their own unique formula. 

Other key ingredients may include L-Arginine, Citrulline, Agmatine Sulfate, Theanine, Glycerol and Taurine to name a few. 

Deciding and Dosing a Pre Workout 

The important thing about deciding on a pre-workout is determining what your body is going to react to the best. Sometimes too much of one ingredient can cause undesirable effects. For example, if you are sensitive to beta-alanine, you will find that having a full serving of a pre-workout that is high in the substance will result in an uncomfortable level of tingling throughout the body. Too much caffeine may cause jitters. 

We recommend you start your pre-workout supplementation by using only half the recommended dose for the first workout or two, in order to evaluate how your body responds. 

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