Super Heavyweight to Cruiser Never Hurt Mike Wilson’s Ability!


Super Heavyweight to Cruiser Never Hurt Mike Wilson’s Ability!
By: Ken Hissner

I used to see Mike Wilson and Mike Hunter’s names in the amateur results all the time. Both are unbeaten in the professional ranks at 15-0. Wilson turned professional in 2009 at the age of 26 which Hunter is now. At 33 Wilson has reduced his weight down to cruiserweight and is ready for a “new start” under well-known manager andadvisor Bob Spagnola out of Houston, TX. He worked with former WBA super welterweight champion Austin “No Doubt” Trout, former IBF bantamweight champion Orlando Canizales, former IBF featherweight champion Calvin Groves and former IBF middleweight champion Frank Tate. “Mike is a hard worker who got in better shape as a professional getting down to cruiserweight,” said Spagnola.

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Wilson draws 3,000 fans in his fights in his home state of ORE. At 6:03 as a cruiserweight it hasn’t diminished his ability. He is 15-0 with 7 knockouts and will be turning 34 this February. He was the 2004/2005 US Super heavyweight champion to give you an idea how much weight he has reduced down to. He had quite a good amateur career against top opponents though 36-20. He has been trained from day one by Jimmy Pedrojetti. He even has his own gym in his house where others boxers come to train.

Wilson defeated Nate James three times, split with 2004 Olympian Jason Estrada, won 2 out of 3 against
Nicolai Firtha including the 2004 Olympic trials. The win put him in against Estrada where he lost in the finals and in the box-off. Healso defeated now professional boxers Eugene Hill, 32-1, Travis Kauffman 30-1, Lenroy Thomas 20-4 and Donovan Dennis 12-3.

In contacting Jason Estrada’s father who also promoted he had this to say: “Wow, is he still fighting? Tough kid. Think he was probably able to get most of his amateur success because of his big heart. Skill wise probably B- but perseverance A+. I know he did win the US Championship’s and that’s no joke. And he made it to the finals of the Olympic trialswhich is also hugh accomplishment. Great kid,” said Dr. Roland Estrada.

Wilson’s loss in 2007 to Mike Hunter 25-24 was a turning point in Wilson turning professional. He also lost decisions to Victor Bisbalwho represented PR in the Olympics now 22-3 and Mike Marrone 21-6. As you can see he fought the best US heavyweights. “I took Marrone for granted and it cost me. He hurt me with body shots in the first round and I was glad it was only 3 rounds. When we met in our second fight I beat him so bad he held on until the referee finally had to DQ him,” said Wilson. It is so refreshing to hear a boxer speak with such honesty as Wilson.

“Mike had a great amateur career and we wish him the best in his professional career. I think he made the right decision to fight at cruiserweight. Mike has a good jab and has the amateur experience that should help him go far,” said Marshall Kauffman. This is from the father and trainer of his son Travis who was world ranked until an injury set him back. Marshall promotes under the Kings Promotions banner out of Reading, PA.

Wilson turned professional in August of 2009 winning three of his first four fights in Tunica, MS, and one in Memphis, TN. “I got in touch with Bob Spagnola whom I knew and wanted some help and he sent me to Australia to spar with David Green who was preparing for B.J. Flores. Green asked if I wanted to be on the undercard and I agreed. I was match with the Australia and New Zealand Golden Glove champion Jae Bryce and won a decision,” said Wilson.

Next for Wilson was a win over 32 fight veteran Joseph Rabotte in RI, promoted by CES. Then in his debut in his home state of ORE in August of 2012 at the Seven Feathers Hotel & Casino Resort, in Canyonville, ORE, he started became the local favorite. Next came a stoppage in Montana and three more fights in Oregon. He defeated Rayford Johnson, 7-8, Mike Alderete 7-6-2, and Derek Williams 4-0 in April of 2015 after being inactive for 18 months. In his last fight in 2015 in July he knocked out Juan Reyna, 5-4-1, in 2 rounds, at the Fairgrounds in his hometown of Medford, ORE.

Wilson improved to 15-0 with 3 wins in 2016. In January he stopped Adam Collins, 13-11. In May he won a 6 round decision over Mike Bissett, 10-8. In his last fight he defeated ArandoAncona in September over 8 rounds. His next scheduled bout is January 13th at the Jackson County Expo Central Point, in ORE, against heavyweight Aaron Chavers, 7-1-1, who is to come in at 199 in a scheduled 8 round main event.
The state of ORE is most remembered for the Moyer brothers, Denny and Phil. Wilson decided to have his wife serve as promoter naming the promotion “White Delight Promotions”. That was the nickname he had gotten in the amateurs. It reminded me of 1976 Olympian Chuck Walker who got the nickname of “White Chocolate” from the otherwise all black teammates. “Back in the amateurs if you were white and you could fight you were respected and that’s where the name White Delight came from the black fighters,” said Wilson. This is how it is in most environments in boxing when you earn the respect of being a minority in boxing.

“We have such good fans. We do ringside tables and I know all the blue collar folks, electricians, plumbers and we have girls serving drinks and advertising for the business people. We did 44 tables the first show we promoted. We charged 1k a table for the first row, 750 for the second row and 500 for the third row which usually were not the advertisers,” said Wilson.

Without the casino’s or PPV’s in ORE the Wilson’s have made a success doing the promotions the “old fashion way!”

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